Forums: Animation: Top 5 influential animated shows

 
  • Avatar of Mother3_GBA

    Mother3_GBA

    [21]Sep 19, 2007
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    King_CGF wrote:
    5.Looney Toons- Any cartoon using physical humore (Besides T&J) are modeling themselves after Looney toons.


    Well, I wouldn't say any cartoon that uses physical humor is modeled after Looney Tunes, but I would say any cartoon that has a sufficient amount of slapstick/cartoony violence humor, on a regular basis, would be modeled after Looney Toons.
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  • Avatar of Angus_Mac

    Angus_Mac

    [22]Sep 19, 2007
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    New school Animation that raises or lowers a standard at my home.

    1. Spike and Mike's (Sick and Twisted / Classic) Animation Festivals – With cartoon shorts that were both on the cutting edge of greatness, and at the same time, shorts that were on the edge of offending everyone, this series was a launching pad for new artists putting out stuff like Creature Comforts (Aardman), Frog Baseball (Beavis and Butthead), and The Spirit of Christmas (South Park). Not to mention Bambi Meets Godzilla.

    2. Who Framed Roger Rabbit? – The beginning of making popular again animation mixed with real people. Granted there were plenty of shows and movies before then doing that, but this one made it seamless, plus it had all the cross-generational/cross-product cartoons all hanging out together. Cartoon Network's gimmick of mixing characters owes its originality to this movie.

    3. Beauty and the Beast – If Snow White was the old school classic, this is the new school one. How did musicals and Disney animation so popular? It started with The Little Mermaid, and progressed through all sorts of titles. Now you've got Disney Princesses, and there's no going back. Also introduced everyone to a little company called Pixar, whose biggest shorts back then were just about a moving lamplight.

    4. The Simpsons – Bringing adult-oriented cartoons back to prime-time, and being culturally relevant, is what keeps this series on the air even after numerous opportunities that would have marked its demise. Full of lots of pop culture references and culture-defining moments, and little details that reward freeze-framers. Also backed up by a longtime alternative comics contributor with some originally creative 3x3 paneling.

    5. Full Metal Alchemist – we're measuring any new anime that comes into the household against this one. As I've mentioned before, this is perhaps the only anime I'll recommend to my non-anime friends whose last exposure to anime was Robotech or Akira.
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  • Avatar of talonmalon333

    talonmalon333

    [23]Sep 19, 2007
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    Angus_Mac wrote:
    Beauty and the Beast – If Snow White was the old school classic, this is the new school one. How did musicals and Disney animation so popular? It started with The Little Mermaid, and progressed through all sorts of titles. Now you've got Disney Princesses, and there's no going back. Also introduced everyone to a little company called Pixar, whose biggest shorts back then were just about a moving lamplight.

    That's my number one favorite Broadway musical ! I also love the movie.

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  • Avatar of DBZAOTA482

    DBZAOTA482

    [24]Jul 9, 2010
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    1.The Simpsons(I'm never wasreally a fan but it was a magor influence tonumerouswell-known sitcoms,most notably Family Guy)


    2.DragonBall(This anime set a record on how agreat anime should be,& it enormously increased aninterest in the artform(not only kids)across the globe)


    3.Transformers(Not a fan but it maderobo action the big thing)


    4.Cowboy Bebop(Again,not a fan butitmade anime appealing to the mature western audience)


    5.Gundam(Fan : No butit made mecha anime interesting)

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  • Avatar of DaVulture

    DaVulture

    [25]Jul 10, 2010
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    1.The Simpson's- Its probably the 2nd longest running animated program in the world other then Doraemon in Japan, but this show broke the mold of everything you expected a typical family to be, and turned the whole genre of cartoons from children to adult. You can't honestly tell me one person born in the 80's or 90's who weren't somehow influenced by the Simpson's, I mean the quality now is garbage but for the time it was pretty out there. It practically influenced everything from Malcolm in the Middle, South Park, Futurama and Family Guy not to mention the handful of dysfunctional TV shows on today.


    2. Looney Toons- Bugs, Daffy and the other characters they've been incarnated in so many forms from the Michael Jordan movie "Space Jam" to the movie "Looney Toons" back in action. The show was so revolutionary because of the intricate characters, scenarios and the humor. I mean give credit to the people like Tex Avery and Chuck Jones for creating a really revolutionary program, and Mel Blanc for using his amazing voice to bring life to many of these characters.


    3. Tom and Jerry- Hanna Barbera really produced a gem with this one, a series that rarely involved the two main characters speaking but tons of mischief and mayhem. I loved this show because it was all slapstick oriented and the Three Stooges re-formated without sound. It's so simple yet, so brilliant (Their even was a Tom and Jerry kids prequel and a few movies) and is definitely one of the most influential cartoons of all time.


    4. Scooby Doo- Scooby Doo was a program that symbolized the 60's well, a talking dog and a bunch of crazy kids. I don't think the original program lasted long, and the mysteries were always kind of a bit ridiculous. Yet the show worked because of compelling characters, a hungry dog and a bunch of wacky characters. It was influential enough to spin various sequels, a prequel and a few movies.


    5. Flintstones- It was probably one of the first animated programs to air in prime-time, and though it kind of was a reinterpretation of The Honeymooners it was just so unique at the time that an animated program could air on prime-time and appeal to a mass audience, it was a Top 30 hit in it's First three seasons how many animated programs can say that. Not to mention all the merchandise and movies it has spawned.


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  • Avatar of TotalWattage

    TotalWattage

    [26]Jul 10, 2010
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    A note on the Flintstones, Which might raise it's position on your lists. The Flintstones was the first show on TV (animated or live) to suggest that married adults shared the same bed. In the earlier episodes, there were two beds in Fred and Wilma's room. I believe it took The Brady Bunch a few years to follow suit Just a little food for thought.

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  • Avatar of Copper40

    Copper40

    [27]Jul 10, 2010
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    Looney Tunes
    Pokemon
    Simpsons
    Flintstones
    School House Rock
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  • Avatar of DaVulture

    DaVulture

    [28]Jul 10, 2010
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    TotalWattage wrote:

    A note on the Flintstones, Which might raise it's position on your lists. The Flintstones was the first show on TV (animated or live) to suggest that married adults shared the same bed. In the earlier episodes, there were two beds in Fred and Wilma's room. I believe it took The Brady Bunch a few years to follow suit Just a little food for thought.



    Never knew that. I find that pretty interesting.
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  • Avatar of ZaleIsBackAgain

    ZaleIsBackAgain

    [29]Jul 11, 2010
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    Shows like Popeye, The Flinstones, Scooby Doo, Looney Tunes, Tom and Jerry, and other oldies are a given; the most influential ones will always be the first couple of shows that have premiered since there's an entire gold mine of ideas that have yet to be explored. Despite that, I'll leave them off my list just because they're too obvious and they're FAR beyond my time to have known first hand how influential they were.

    5. Spongebob Squarepants - Loved by children and adults alike, cartoons are mainly marketed for children, but Spongebob Squarepant draws children through its appeal, and older adults with its creative writing and parody to older cartoons.

    4. Dragonball Z - Pokemone was more known, but Dragonball Z was more popular. Greatly influenced two of the most popular mangas in Japan right now, One Piece and Naruto, and there are plenty of other shounens that Dragonball Z inspired that we probably won't get a chance to experience.

    3. Dexter's Laboratory - Don't think people remember how influential this show was. It seems like the entire team that worked on Dexter's Laboratory went on to make half of the popular cartoons today. Watch any Cartoon Network show and you'll see the humour can be traced back to Dexter's Laboratory.

    2. Gundam and all of its recreations - One of the biggest stereotypes of Japan is the obsession with giant robots. I believe there were giant robot shows earlier than Gundam, but Gundam is by far the most recognized mecha license on the planet. Actually, it could be Transformers, especially thanks to the recent movies.

    1. The Simpsons - I could be greatly mistaken, but I can't think of an older show that used the concept of cross roles to such a degree. A middle family aged man with the intelligence of an elementary school student, a daughter that seems to be smarter than half the town, etc. It defied the trend and now shows are trying to up the standard, but The Simpsons will always be known as the cartoon to have set the bar.
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