Aesop & Son

(ended 1962)
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  • Episode Guide
  • S 1 : Ep 38

    The Fox and the Three Weasels

    Aired 8/1/62

  • S 1 : Ep 37

    The French Poodle and the Alley Cat

    Aired 7/31/62

  • S 1 : Ep 36

    The Hare and the Tortoise II

    Aired 7/30/62

  • S 1 : Ep 35

    The Fox and the Rabbit

    Aired 7/29/62

  • S 1 : Ep 34

    The Country Frog and the City Frog

    Aired 7/28/62

  • Cast & Crew
  • Daws Butler

    Additional Voices

  • Charlie Ruggles

    Aesop's Son

  • George Atkins

  • Gerard Baldwin

  • Pete Burness

  • show Description
  • This show was actually a short included as part of Bullwinkle and Friends. In each episode, Aesop tells his son, Aesop Jr., a fable, filled with morals, but also humour.

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    User Score: 638

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  • Trivia & Quotes
  • Quotes (4)

    • Hare: Late again, huh? Tortoise: Lights... were against me.

    • Romeo: My friend here (Julius), is sick. Julius: I've got a frog in my mouth. Romeo: No you don't. (to the Beaver) He's got the pox. Beaver: Chicken pox? Romeo: No, frog pox.

    • Johann: Hey, keep your eyes open for an Indian-head nickel, I'm saving them.
      Ludwig: OK, you keep your eyes open for a nickle-headed Indian, I'm saving them.

    • Ugly hen: Would you take me as your wife? Rooster: I wouldn't take you for a walk!

    Notes (7)

    • This is one of the few episodes which don't have a moral (or at least it is never revealed).

    • The moral of this episode is "Honesty is the best policy".

    • The moral of this episode is "He who laughs last, laughs best".

    • The moral of this episode is "Two heads are better than one".

    • The moral of this episode is "Practice makes perfect".

    • This is one of the few episodes where Junior tells the fable instead of Aesop.

    • The moral of this episode is "The plainest box often holds the best gift".

    Show More Notes

    Trivia (29)

    • Aesop wears a red toga in this episode, as opposed to his usual white one.

    • The moral of this story was, "Slow and steady wins the race". Aesop Junior's modified moral was, "Haste makes waist".

    • Despite the fact that Aesop says the moral of the story is "Slow and steady wins the race", on his scroll it is written as "Slow and easy wins the race".

    • The hare was sentenced to prison for 30 days at first, for not having a dog license. Then, an additional 30 years, for still not having a dog license, and finally for another 30 years - 1 year for trying to escape prison, and the other 29 for impersonating the Easter Bunny.

    • The moral of this story was, "Quality is more important than quantity". Aesop Junior's modified moral was, "Good things come in smell packages".

    • Aesop wears a red toga in this episode, as opposed to his usual white one.

    • The moral of this story was, "Practice makes perfect". Aesop Junior's modified moral was, "A bird in the band is worth 2 in the bush".

    • The two hares in this story were named Johann and Ludwig.

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    Allusions (7)

    • Romulus and Remus

      Aesop Junior was training to win a race against Romulus and Remus, who according to Roman mythology were twin brothers who were raised by a wolf and later became the founders of the City of Rome.

    • Croesus

      At the start of the episode, it's revealed that Aesop Junior got into a fight with Croesus' son, Butch Croesus. Croesus was the king of Lydia from 560 to 547 BC until his defeat by the Persians. His son, however, was named Atys.

    • The two hares in the story were named Johann and Ludwig. Their names are most likely allusions to famous musicians or composers throughout history. Either Johann Strauss, or Johann Sebastian Bach, and Ludwig Van Beethoven.

    • Croesus

      At the start of the episode, it's revealed that Aesop Junior's girlfriend broke up with him and got together with Butch Croesus. Croesus was the king of Lydia from 560 to 547 BC until his defeat by the Persians. His son, however, was named Atys.

    • Something was rotten in Denmark

      A quote from William Shakespeare's play Hamlet, though the actual quote is "Something is rotten in the state of Denmark".

    • King Kong

      The fox calls the organ grinder's monkey King Kong, referring to the famous fictional character, King Kong, a colossal gorilla that has appeared in several movies and other media projects since 1933.

    • Plato

      At the start of the episode, Aesop finds his son eating watermelons from Plato's watermelon patch. Plato was an influential philosopher and mathematician in Ancient Greece.

    Show More Allusions
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