Beakman's World

(ended 1998)
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  • Episode Guide
  • S 4 : Ep 26

    Fingerprints, Beakmania and Flatulence

    Aired 3/17/95

  • S 4 : Ep 25

    Horses, Beakmania and Refrigerators

    Aired 3/10/95

  • S 4 : Ep 24

    Protozoology, Beakmania and Movie Stunts

    Aired 3/3/95

  • S 4 : Ep 23

    Action-Reaction, Beakmania and Talking Birds

    Aired 2/24/95

  • S 4 : Ep 22

    Human Growth, Beakmania and Solutions and Suspensions

    Aired 2/23/95

  • Cast & Crew
  • Alanna Ubach

    Josie

  • Senta Moses

    Phoebe

  • Paul Zaloom

    Beakman

  • Mark Ritts

    Lester the Rat

  • Jean Stapleton

    Beakman's Mom

  • show Description
  • Beakman’s World was an educational children’s television show starring the eccentric scientist Professor Beakman (Paul Zaloom). Aided by a female assistant (Josie (Alanna Ubach, 1993-94); Liza (Eliza Schneider, 1994-95); Phoebe (Senta Moses, 1995-96)) and Lester the Rat (Mark Ritts), Beakman performed comical experiments and demonstrations to illustrate various scientific concepts, from density to electricity. At the beginning and end of the show, as well as before or after commercial breaks, the show featured short scenes portraying puppet penguins, Don (Bert Berdis) and Herb (Alan Barzman), at the North Pole watching Beakman’s World on television. Beakman’s World was a production of Columbia Tri-Star Television Distribution, Columbia Pictures Television. It premiered in September of 1992, on The Learning Channel (TLC) cable network and in national syndication (225 stations). On September 18, 1993 it moved from national syndication to CBS’ Saturday morning children’s lineup. The program was based upon the comic strip “You Can with Beakman and Jax,” created by Jok Church. The program was also nominated for numerous Daytime Emmy awards, and won three in the category of Outstanding Achievement in Live and Tape Sound Mixing and Sound Effects.moreless

  • Trivia & Quotes
  • Quotes (501)

    • Josie: Dear Beakman, how much ice in the Antarctic? Don: (jumping up and down) They got our letter! They got our letter! Herb: Calm down, Don. I want to hear the answer. I've got a lot invested in the question.

    • Josie: How many hamburgers can you get out of a cow? Beakman: It depends on how nicely you ask. (pauses) Actually, you can get about 400 quarter pounders out of one cow. Lester: Of course, the lettuce, tomato and onion would be extra.

    • Beakman: You wheel, I'll deal; now, let's peel.

    • Beakman: Whoa, gravity! It's the law!!!

    • Announcer: And now, the one you heard about, the one you've been waiting for. The quarterback of questions, the King Kong of knowledge, the duke of discussion, the giantest of scientists, the Elvis of experimentation, the B-Man himself... Beakman: Me - Beakman, and you've just broken off into Beakman's World!

    • Josie: Coming up next, it gets bigger, it comes to a head, it explodes, it terrorizes mankind... Lester: And no, it's not a zit!!

    • Beakman: Bolt the doors, bar the windows, your own personal scientist is here to answer your questions!

    • Josie: You've got more pull around here than I thought. Lester: If I did, this would be Lester's World.

    Show More Quotes

    Notes (80)

    • For the first episode, Beakman starts out as soft-spoken and humble although he becomes more eccentric through the series. Josie is exuberant, later to become more comical and Lester later drops the bitter actor in a rat suit bit to become more slapstick himself.

    • Beakman introduces the bogus-scope in this episode. It's a device for showing grand or otherwise hard to understand concepts.

    • The "Living Scientists" fact is included in the "Best of Beakman" video/DVD.

    • There is no Beakmania intro for this episode nor a second question. The second question this episode is actually a stretched out explanation for one of the Beakmania questions.

    • The saliva fact is included in the "Best of Beakman" video/DVD.

    • The Beakman Challenge for this show is featured in the Best of Beakman.

    • This episode includes an early appearance of Beakman as stodgy and overly-scientific Professor I. M. Boring.

    • The Wright Brothers fact is included in the "Best of Beakman" video/DVD.

    Show More Notes

    Trivia (43)

    • Famous Dead Guy: Isaac Newton (with backup singers) The backup singers were called The Lawlettes of Motion. They were played by Rita Valente and Julie Christensen.

    • Beakman mentions that paper cannot be folded more than nine times; this concept was taken to extraordinary levels and busted on the TV series Mythbusters.

    • Famous Dead Guy: Philo T. Farnsworth

    • After Beakman dozes off from listening to I. M. Boring, Bones the skeleton wakes him up. Bones was last seen in Episode 7.

    • "Famous Dead Guy" - Zacharias Janssen

    • In Thermodynamics, Beakman is joined by the singing gases played by Lori Perry, Sharon Perry and Carolyn Perry.

    • Famous Dead Guy: Dr. Louis S.B. Leakey (1903-1972)

    • Paul Zaloom recalls having a lot of fun playing Bell as "cranky, mean and cheap," calling it revenge on the phone companies.

    Show More Trivia

    Allusions (53)

    • Toto Toto was the dog in the classic 1937 movie, The Wizard of Oz, which was revealed in a dream, tying into Beakman's dream examination.

    • The Three Stooges
      The Three Stooges seen this episode, named Larry, Curly and Moe, were very famous comic slapstick comedians with a long history in vaudeville in 1925 to a brief movie career ending in 1959. They began with Shemp who departed to be replaced by his and Moe's brother, Curly, and later returned after Curly had a stroke. Shemp later departed and was replaced by Joe Besser, but when Joe parted out, Joe DeRita, joined the gang for their motion picture careers. When Larry decided to bow-out, he was almost replaced by Emil Sitka, one of the Stooges favorite co-stars, but by now, Moe was unable to continue and they officially broke-up the act.

    • When Beakman vanishes and returns as Balance Man, Josie acts as if she doesn't recognize him and even wonders where Beakman went. This harkens back to the old 1950s Superman serials where Lois Lane didn't recognize Superman even though he was just Clark Kent without his glasses.

    • Jiminy Cricket In the cricket segment, Beakman says they always let their conscience be their guide. This is the quote of Jiminy Cricket, a character from Disney's "Pinocchio."

    • The Three Stooges In the episode, Beakman and Lester watch the popular 1941 Three Stooges short, "Dutiful But Dumb," where Curly battles and kills a live oyster in his soup snapping at him.

    • Misty Rowe Misty Rowe mentioned in the Beakmania opening was a popular actress from the 1970s and 1980s best known as one of the Hee Haw Honeys on the long-running and successful "Hee Haw" country variety show from 1972-1991. the beauty winner also starred in the only season of "When Things were Rotten" in 1975, the first season of "Happy Days" and even once played Marilyn Monroe.

    • Pete Barbutti Pete Barbutti mentioned in the Beak-mania intro is a musical stand-up comic who was big in the 70s and 80s and most well-known for his appearances on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson.

    • Daffy Duck
      Daffy Duck is one of the trademark characters of Warner Brothers in the Looney Tunes/Merrie Melodies roster of cartoon characters.

    Show More Allusions
  • Fan Reviews (16)
  • Top Shows - Quirky, educational humor of the 90s

    By anastasia1243, Feb 08, 2014

  • Good TV

    By bostonjoe, Feb 03, 2011

  • What a great way to get kids interested in science! Explosions, slime, dirt, what fun!

    By danorviel, Dec 17, 2008

  • For someone who grew up watching "Mr. Wizard" on PBS and got converted to the idea of a career in science, this show has all the appeal of watching chimpanzees throw (expletive deleted.)

    By bnw1955, Apr 06, 2008

  • Ecucation made fun for kids and annoying to grown ups.

    By twilightboy, Dec 20, 2006

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