Ben Casey

ABC (ended 1966)
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  • Episode Guide
  • S 6 : Ep 1

    The Return of Ben Casey

    Aired 3/1/88

  • S 5 : Ep 26

    Then, Suddenly, Panic

    Aired 3/21/66

  • S 5 : Ep 25

    Pull The Wool Over Your Eyes, Here Comes The Cold Wind Of Truth

    Aired 3/14/66

  • S 5 : Ep 24

    Twenty-Six Ways To Spell Heartbreak, A, B, C, D ...

    Aired 2/28/66

  • S 5 : Ep 23

    Where Did All the Roses Go?

    Aired 2/21/66

  • Cast & Crew
  • Stella Stevens

    Jane Hancock

  • Franchot Tone

    Dr. Daniel Niles Freeland

  • John Zaremba

    Dr. Harold Jensen

  • Marlyn Mason

    Sally Welden

  • Jeanne Bates

    Nurse Wills

  • show Description
  • Dr. Ben Casey was a resident neurosurgeon at County General Hospital along with Dr. Zorba, the chief of Neurosurgery. Casey's hard nosed demeanor and no nonsense approach made him almost unlikeable but he saved lives and that's what counted.

  • Trivia & Quotes
  • Quotes (2)

    • Cathy Reed: (to Dr. Ben Casey, as she awakens after a car accident) Are you God?

    • DR. CASEY: (Voiceover.) Truth is not only stranger than fiction, but it has a reality which fiction cannot match. This child and other handicapped children you'll see later and their teachers are NOT professional actors. They are playing themselves—as they are.

    Notes (10)

    • In this pilot episode, Dr. Jensen is played by Maurice Manson.

    • Jeanne Cooper was nominated for an Emmy for her performance in this episode.

    • George C. Scott and Jack Laird were nominated for Emmys.

    • Joan Hackett was nominated for an Emmy.

    • Kim Stanley and Glenda Farrell won Emmies, Sydney Pollack and Norman Katkov were nominated.

    • Part one of two, concluded September 16, 1963 as Episode 1 ("Solo for B-flat Clarinet") of Breaking Point.

    • The title is also known as Ice Floe.

    • Lew Ayres was the original Dr. Kildare in the movies.

    Show More Notes

    Trivia (1)

    • 'Atalanta' When the hounds of spring are on winter's traces, The mother of months in meadow or plain Fills the shadows and windy places With lisp of leaves and ripple of rain; And the brown bright nightingale amorous Is half assuaged for Itylus, For the Thracian ships and the foreign faces. The tongueless vigil, and all the pain. Come with bows bent and with emptying of quivers, Maiden most perfect, lady of light, With a noise of winds and many rivers, With a clamour of waters, and with might; Bind on thy sandals, O thou most fleet, Over the splendour and speed of thy feet; For the faint east quickens, the wan west shivers, Round the feet of the day and the feet of the night. Where shall we find her, how shall we sing to her, Fold our hands round her knees, and cling? O that man's heart were as fire and could spring to her, Fire, or the strength of the streams that spring! For the stars and the winds are unto her As raiment, as songs of the harp-player; For the risen stars and the fallen cling to her, And the southwest-wind and the west-wind sing. For winter's rains and ruins are over, And all the season of snows and sins; The days dividing lover and lover, The light that loses, the night that wins; And time remember'd is grief forgotten, And frosts are slain and flowers begotten, And in green underwood and cover Blossom by blossom the spring begins. The full streams feed on flower of rushes, Ripe grasses trammel a travelling foot, The faint fresh flame of the young year flushes From leaf to flower and flower to fruit; And fruit and leaf are as gold and fire, And the oat is heard above the lyre, And the hoofed heel of a satyr crushes The chestnut-husk at the chestnut-root. And Pan by noon and Bacchus by night, Fleeter of foot than the fleet-foot kid, Follows with dancing and fills with delight The Maenad and the Bassarid; And soft as lips that laugh and hide The laughing leaves of the trees divide, And screen from seeing and leave in sight The god pursuing, the maiden hid. The ivy falls with the Bacchanal's hair Over her eyebrows hiding her eyes; The wild vine slipping down leaves bare Her bright breast shortening into sighs; The wild vine slips with the weight of its leaves, But the berried ivy catches and cleaves To the limbs that glitter, the feet that scare The wolf that follows, the fawn that flies. Algernon Charles Swinburne

    Allusions (45)

    • The title is taken from the children's prayer: Now I lay me down to sleep. I pray the Lord my soul to keep. If I should die before I wake, I pray the Lord my soul to take.

    • From the Bible, Revelation 6:8 And behold, a pale horse, and he who sat on it, his name was Death. Hades followed with him. Authority over one fourth of the earth, to kill with the sword, with famine, with death, and by the wild animals of the earth was given to him.

    • So oft it chances in particular men That (for some vicious mole of nature in them, As in their birth, wherein they are not guilty, Since nature cannot choose his origin) By the o'ergrowth of some complexion, Oft breaking down the pales and forts of reason, Or by some habit, that too much o'erleavens The form of plausive manners—that (these men, Carrying, I say, the stamp of one defect, Being nature's livery, or fortune's star) Their virtues else, be they as pure as grace, As infinite as man may undergo, Shall in the general censure take corruption From that particular fault. The dram of evil Doth all the noble substance of a doubt, To his own scandal. Hamlet

    • I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear; Those of mechanics—each one singing his, as it should be, blithe and strong; The carpenter singing his, as he measures his plank or beam, The mason singing his, as he makes ready for work, or leaves off work; The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat—the deckhand singing on the steamboat deck; The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench—the hatter singing as he stands; The wood-cutter's song—the ploughboy's, on his way in the morning, or at the noon intermission, or at sundown; The delicious singing of the mother—or of the young wife at work—or of the girl sewing or washing—Each singing what belongs to her, and to none else; The day what belongs to the day—at night, the party of young fellows, robust, friendly, Singing, with open mouths, their strong melodious songs. Come! some of you! still be flooding The States with hundreds and thousands of mouth-songs fit for The States only. Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass

    • Bye, Bye Blackbird Pack up all my cares and woe, Here I go, Singing low, bye bye blackbird, Where somebody waits for me, Sugar's sweet, so is she, Bye bye blackbird. No one here can love or understand me, Oh, what hard luck stories they all hand me, Make my bed, light that light, Babe I'm comin on home tonight, Blackbird bye bye. Pack up all my cares and woe, Here I go, Singing low, bye bye blackbird, Where somebody waits for me, Sugar's sweet, so is she, Bye bye blackbird. No one here can love or understand me, Oh, what hard luck stories they all hand me, Make my bed, light that light, Ill arrive late tonight, Blackbird bye bye.

    • Bye, Bye Blackbird Pack up all my cares and woe, Here I go, Singing low, bye bye blackbird, Where somebody waits for me, Sugar's sweet, so is she, Bye bye blackbird. No one here can love or understand me, Oh, what hard luck stories they all hand me, Make my bed, light that light, Babe I'm comin on home tonight, Blackbird bye bye. Pack up all my cares and woe, Here I go, Singing low, bye bye blackbird, Where somebody waits for me, Sugar's sweet, so is she, Bye bye blackbird. No one here can love or understand me, Oh, what hard luck stories they all hand me, Make my bed, light that light, Ill arrive late tonight, Blackbird bye bye.

    • It is of the Lord's mercies that we are not consumed, because his compassions fail not. They are new every morning: great is thy faithfulness. The Lord is my portion, saith my soul; therefore will I hope in him. Lamentations

    • He thought he saw an Albatross That fluttered round the lamp: He looked again, and found it was A Penny-Postage Stamp. "You'd best be getting home," he said: "The nights are very damp!" ... He thought he saw an Argument That proved he was the Pope: He looked again, and found it was A Bar of Mottled Soap. "A fact so dread," he faintly said, "Extinguishes all hope!" Lewis Carroll, The Mad Gardener's Song

    Show More Allusions
  • Fan Reviews (2)
  • I have always liked the dr. ben casey show, and I think that it will do good today, I think that it will just as popular as it was when it first aired,I work in a hospital and I think of this show every time I push my cart through a set of doors.

    By thesun898, Dec 04, 2006

  • One of the best B&W shows I've ever seen. I used to watch these in the 80's when NBC would show them in the early morning hours of like 3 or 4 am...I wish I could see these episodes now.

    By THEJELLYBEAN66, Aug 16, 2006

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