Cheyenne

ABC (ended 1963)
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  • Episode Guide
  • S 7 : Ep 13

    Showdown at Oxbend

    Aired 12/17/62

  • S 7 : Ep 12

    Wanted for the Murder of...

    Aired

  • S 7 : Ep 12

    Wanted for the Murder of Cheyenne Bodie

    Aired 12/10/62

  • S 7 : Ep 11

    Johnny Brassbuttons

    Aired 12/3/62

  • S 7 : Ep 10

    Vengeance Is Mine

    Aired 11/26/62

  • Cast & Crew
  • L.Q. Jones

    Smitty

  • Clint Walker

    Cheyenne Bodie

  • Russ McCubbin

    (Stunt Man For Clint Walker As Cheyenne Bodie)

  • Will Hutchins

    Tom (Sugarfoot) Brewster

  • Ed Prentiss

    Major Grant

  • show Description
  • Cheyenne Bodie was a big man, a former army scout who went west after the American Civil War and drifted from job to job, here a cowboy, there a lawman, and always a larger-than-life hero.

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  • NiteWatch

    User Score: 1644

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  • Trivia & Quotes
  • Quotes (5)

    • (Cheyenne and Smitty approach the outlaw-run town of Paso Alto.) Cheyenne: You know, I wouldn't mind owning some of this land. Smitty: We ain't careful, we liable to. About six foot apiece.

    • Pat Keogh, on checking the fate of his partner in crime, who has just been shot, tells Cheyenne "Turner just bought himself some ground!"

    • The bank manager's daughter has just been rescued by Cheyenne from a fate worse than death at the hands of Pat Keogh. Cheyenne is alone in the room with the still hysterical woman when Keogh interrupts, saying that the bank manager has returned. Cheyenne leaves the girl and Keogh, closing the door on her, says "Don't feel too bad, honey - we might pass this way again!"

    • Mine guard:(to Cheyenne) I want to see you get some sweat on that carcass!

    • Cheyenne: "A gun has no moral standard of its own accord, Frank. It's kinda up to the man that's using it."

    Notes (6)

    • also known as "The Black Hawk War"

    • Clint Walker doesn't take his shirt off in this episode. Instead it's taken off by Beverly Michaels as she plays "nurse." The competition for the big cowboy which then grows up between Michaels and her stepdaughter plays more like something out of Greek tragedy or Eugene O'Neill than a 1950s TV western, making this an unusual "Cheyenne" episode, rooted in psychology rather than action.

    • The forced-to-work-in-a-silver-mine plot appeared again in a "Cimarron City" episode titled "Terror Town" which was shown on Oct. 18, 1958. In this episode, George Montgomery played the reluctant miner.

    • Time Magazine once joked that Clint Walker's contract must call for him to remove his shirt at least once in every episode of "Cheyenne." This episode is no exception and, perhaps more than any other, it exemplifies how Walker's "beefcake" appeal could be accentuated by placing him -- like a blinded Samson -- into situations in which he suffered various forms of abuse. Here, for example, we see him stripped to the waist and chained at the ankles, every muscle of his massive physique sweating and straining as he's forced at gunpoint to push a mine-car filled with a heavy load of ore. At one point he's shown with his wrists cuffed together behind his back. All this bondage, rather than diminishing his strength, seemed to call attention to it while, at the same time, giving him a vulnerability which audiences found appealing. (Incidentally, the plot of "The Trap," in which the hero rides into a strange town and finds himself sentenced to hard labor on trumped-up charges, worked so well in "Cheyenne" that it popped up, in various forms, on a number of other western TV series.)

    • "Take his gun and strip off his shirt. Tie 'im up." When the vengeance-seeking leader of a posse says these words about Cheyenne, viewer interest surely picked up all across America, especially when the leader adds: "I want my whip." Moments later, a member of the posse finishes tying the wrists of a bare-chested Cheyenne to a horizontal tree branch. The posse leader then turns his whip over to his son with the order: "Hit 'im!" The son, however, has scruples. "No one's gonna tell me to horsewhip a man, not even my own father." Thus, after all the build-up, Cheyenne is cut free without receiving a single lash. This is one of the greatest "teases" in TV westerns, along with a sequence in "Rawhide" in which both Eric Fleming and Clint Eastwood are tied shirtless to trees and threatened with a whip only to be rescued at the last possible moment. Perhaps the makers of "Cheyenne" felt that Clint Walker had such a broad back, no whip was up to the task of striking it! In any case, this almost-whipping scene illustrates two common points about the "Cheyenne" series: (1) Situations were always found to strip Clint Walker of his shirt, and (2) Clint Walker, despite his size and strength, usually played his character with a certain passive, almost masochistic quality. Here, for example, he's in a situation where he's about to be horsewhipped -- perhaps savagely and without mercy -- and yet he's shown meekly standing next to the tree branch as his wrists are tied, making no protests and offering no resistance. One wonders if such Quaker-like behavior would ever be found in any of today's "action heroes."

    • From January 1 to April 24, 2009 the Encore Westerns channel has aired a supposed full-run of "Cheyenne". But it seems that the network syndication package that Encore Westerns channel acquired has had the ep "A Man Called Ragan" removed from it. This can be seen in several ways. First, it should have aired as episode #95 on Wednesday, 08-Apr-2009, but instead of "Ragan", ep. #96 "The Durango Brothers" aired, and in the Encore Westerns schedule PDF file "0904WST1.pdf" it clearly states that their package regards "Durango Brothers" as #95. Also, the end of the Cheyenne run, when it wraps back to #1 which is on Friday, April 24, 2009, it is expected that the last episode to air would be #108, but the PDF file clearly shows Encore Westerns regards that one as ep. #107; that is because ONE episode of the 108 does not air in their pack, that being: "A Man Called Ragan". Evidently, the powers-that-be have decreed that since Clint Walker does not appear in ep #95, and since ep #95 was simply a PILOT ep for "The Dakotas", that it is not a proper inclusion in the "Cheyenne" network syndex package. I am posting this here under Notes for "A Man Called Ragan" so that other TV recording completists who are wondering (after recording the whole "Cheyenne" run for four months off Encore Westerns) ... 'where the heck is episode 95?', can search Google and find the details of the above analysis ... and appreciate the other 107 episodes they did get.

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    Trivia (8)

    • This is the first of what proved to be many episodes in which Clint Walker appears without his shirt. As a "beefcake" bonus, guest-star Rod Taylor is also seen bare-chested.

    • "Rendezvous at Red Rock" is the only episode in which you will hear Gerald Mohr sing and play the piano. Songs he sings are "My Darling Clementine", "Oh, I Killed a Man" and "Aura Lee", the original version of "Love Me Tender". Mr Mohr was an accomplished pianist.

    • One would expect an outdoorsman such as "Cheyenne Bodie" to have a deeper tan on his face, neck, lower arms and hands than on the rest of his torso. However, whenever Clint Walker takes off his shirt, he doesn't show any of these "tan lines."

    • Interseting to watch James Garner in an uncharacteristic performance as the bad guy. After Maverick it became harder for him to be considered for bad guy roles.

    • This episode was copied almost word for word in a 1958 episode of "Lawman" entitled "The Judge." Even the female characters are named Lilac and Rose. Instead of the Black Jack, Lawman's black-garbed nemesis is "The Actor."

    • The story for this episode was taken from the book "Savage Breed" by Joseph Chadwick.

    • Clint Walker (Cheyenne) did not appear in this episode.

    • This episode was the pilot for the ABC show "The Dakotas."

    Show More Trivia

    Allusions (1)

    • This episode is a re-telling of the classic Warner Brothers 1947 film Treasure of the Sierra Madre which starred Humphrey Bogart, Tim Holt, and Walter Huston. In the episode, Edward Andrews plays the Bogart role, Rod Taylor takes on Tim Holt's, with Clint Walker as Cheyenne standing in for Walter Huston.

  • Fan Reviews (3)
  • Cheyenne was about a man that traveled around the west,after the Civil War, trying to help people that was getting cheated by other people He was a hero to all he met,except crooks. He was part Cheyenne Indian,he lived with them,and knew their ways.Weezy

    By weezy1c, Apr 03, 2009

  • terrific show, i believe the show was just recently released after years. it is a must see and western channel just played a new years marathon for about 24-28 hours or so...

    By TomBodie, Jan 05, 2009

  • This was a classic TV Western drama.

    By vicmackey31, Apr 13, 2006

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