Chico and the Man

Trivia, Quotes, Notes and Allusions

Quotes (3)

  • (Ed looks at the clock after pouring a drink) Ed: Oh, come on Ed, who drinks at nine o'clock in the morning? Let's see, it's five o'clock in London, God save the Queen. (Ed drinks the shot class of whiskey)

  • (Ed drinks what Chico made) Ed: Oooh! Chico: There's no alcohol in it, either. Ed: It doesn't need any alcohol. (Ed drinks some more) Ed: Aaah! Oh, look, it's killing the flies.

  • Ed: (to Raul) Good night, Chico. (Raul corrects him) Ed: You're all Chicos to me.

Notes (14)

  • This is the first of Jonathan Daly's two, unrelated appearances on Chico and the Man. He can also be seen in season two's "This Hollowed Garage."

  • This is the second of Jonathan Daly's two, unrelated appearances on Chico and the Man. He can also be seen in season one's "Veterans."

  • Guest star Della Reese joins the full-time cast next season as a different character.

  • The show moved to Wednesdays at 9:00 p.m.

  • Guest star José Feliciano is the man who sings the show's opening theme.

  • In the book TV Land to Go, author Tom Hill briefly discusses the waning days and weeks of Freddie Prinze's life. Hill notes how Prinze apppeared haggard and gave lethargic, lackluster performances; smiling or otherwise acting happy only when the script specifically called for it.

  • This is the final episode in which Freddie Prinze appears due to his January 29, 1977 death from an ultimately successful suicide attempt the previous day.

  • This is the first episode without Freddie Prinze.

Show More Notes

Trivia (1)

  • Aunt Charo obtained U.S. citizenship far faster than she should've been able to, given that she'd been in the country for a very short time.

Allusions (6)

  • The episode title is borrowed from the Latin E Plurabus Unim, found on the back of the United States' $1 bill.

  • The episode title is a play on the title of William Keighley's 1942 film The Man Who Came to Dinner.

  • The episode title is the same as the best-known song from Fiddler on the Roof.

  • The episode title is a play on the opera Madame Butterfly.

  • The episode title is borrowed from a song of the same name from the musical, Fiddler on the Roof.

  • The episode title is a play on the movie The Americanization of Emily.