Garrow's Law

Season Three, Episode Two

Season 3, Ep 2, Aired 11/20/11
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  • Episode Description
  • Garrow defends two silk weavers accused of industrial sabotage. The case becomes complicated when one turns King's Evidence against the other.

  • Cast & Crew
  • Lyndsey Marshal

    Lady Sarah Hill

  • Alun Armstrong

    John Southouse

  • Rupert Graves

    Sir Arthur Hill

  • Aidan McArdle

    Silvester

  • Andrew Buchan

    William Garrow

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  • Trivia & Quotes
  • Quotes (2)

    • William Garrow: Did I defend a guilty man?
      Catherine Quinn: No matter now.

    • Silvester: Newgate has a… smell about it. Had you noticed this?
      Cathal Foley: It is dog.
      Silvester: No. It is death. Turn King's Evidence and your guilt is set aside at that moment. Shackles will come off and you will walk from here a free man.
      Cathal Foley: But Ciaran must hang. He is my sister's husband. He is my friend.
      Silvester: And you will stand shoulder to shoulder with him at Tyburn.

    Trivia (2)

    • With Industrial Revolution came mass production, which made manual labour obsolete, especially in textile industry. Machines could be managed by the unqualified workers and many skilled textile labourers lost their jobs. People responded by destroying the machines – a capital offence in England at the time. The case in this episode is inspired by the actual case of William Horsford, who was sentenced to death for destroying silk and weaving machines.

    • In Lady Sarah's time, it was nearly impossoble for a woman to obtain custody over her children. Under the law, the legal power over infants belonged to the father and, as long as he lived, the mother had no rights. Lady Sarah's custody battle is inspired by two real cases of Henrietta Greenhill and Caroline Norton. Their unwavering efforts led to the Infant Custody Act of 1839 and the Matrimonial Causes Act of 1857.

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