Jeeves and Wooster

ITV (ended 1993)
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  • Episode Guide
  • S 4 : Ep 6

    The Ties That Bind

    Aired 6/20/93

  • S 4 : Ep 6

    The Ex's Are Nearly Married Off

    Aired 6/20/93

  • S 4 : Ep 5

    Totleigh Towers

    Aired 6/13/93

  • S 4 : Ep 5

    Trouble at Totleigh Towers

    Aired 6/13/93

  • S 4 : Ep 4

    Arrested in a Night Club

    Aired 6/6/93

  • Cast & Crew
  • Stephen Fry

    Reginald Jeeves

  • Hugh Laurie

    Bertie Wooster

  • John Woodnutt

    Sir Watkyn Bassett

  • Michael Ripper

    Drones Porter

  • Robert Daws

    Tuppy Glossop

  • show Description
  • Jeeves and Wooster is the story of Bertie Wooster, a member of the idle rich in pre-World War II England, and Jeeves, his valet. Despite being independently wealthy via inheritance, Bertie still finds himself bowing to the will of his overbearing Aunt Agatha, who is bent on finding a wife for her bachelor nephew. Episode plots generally involve Bertie receiving assignments thrust upon him by his aunts, friends, and even casual acquaintances. Complications arise, but all problems are inevitably solved by the brilliance of Jeeves, whose encyclopedic knowledge and flawless logic are at the center of each of Bertie's triumphs, allowing him to make his friends happy, keep his aunts at bay, and stave-off dreaded nuptials.moreless

  • Top Contributor
  • Stig14

    User Score: 108

    EDITOR

  • Trivia & Quotes
  • Quotes (57)

    • Bertie: I'm sorry, Jeeves, but when you've been a little longer in my employ, you'll come to understand that all of my chums rely heavily on your employer's wisdom, and knowledge of human nature in the conduct of their affairs. Jeeves: Just as you say, Sir. Bertie: Not to mention my organizational powers and just plain... thingness.

    • Lady Glossop: How would you ever support a wife, Mr. Wooster? Bertie: Well, it depends on whose wife it was. I would've said a gentle pressure beneath the left elbow when crossing a busy street normally fills the bill.

    • Aunt Agatha: [Honoria] will mould you! Bertie: I don't want to be moulded. I'm not a jelly. Aunt Agatha: That is a matter of opinion.

    • Aunt Agatha (to Bertie): It is young men like you who make a person with the future of the race at heart despair!

    • Bertie: Tell me, Jeeves, were you always like this, or did it come on suddenly? Jeeves: Sir? Bertie: The brain, the grey matter. Were you an outstandingly brilliant child? Jeeves: My mother thought me intelligent, Sir. Bertie: Well, you can't go by that! My mother thought me intelligent!

    • Tuppy: The thing is, Bertie, what with her great soul and everything, [Cora] has this rather serious outlook on life. I want you to back me up, let her know I've got a serious mind, and so forth. Bertie: (laughing) I didn't know you had any sort of a mind. Tuppy: That is just the sort of remark we don't want, thank you very much!

    • Jeeves: Yes, Sir. The expression is one which I would of course not have employed myself, Sir, but I confess to thinking his lordship ill-advised. One must remember that it is not unusual to find gentleman of a certain age yielding to a sentimental urge. The phenomenon is particularly noticeable, I am given to understand, in the United States of America, amongst the wealthier inhabitants of the city of Pittsburgh. It's notorious. I'm told that sooner or later, unless restrained, they always endeavor to marry a chorus girl. The high turnover rate of chorus girls in the state of Pennsylvania has been a matter of comment for some time in the public prints. Wooster: You finished, Jeeves? Jeeves: Thank you, Sir, yes.

    • Bertie: I just think you're going to find it dashed embarrassing offering this girl money. Aunt Agatha: I'm not proposing to do any such thing. You will undertake the negotiations.

    Show More Quotes

    Notes (70)

    • This episode is a.k.a "Jeeves' Arrival" and "Jeeves Takes Charge".

    • This episode first aired in the US on November 11th 1990.

    • This one episode is taken from five P.G. Wodehouse short stories: Jeeves Takes Charge, The Pride Of The Woosters Is Wounded, Introducing Claude & Eustace, Sir Roderick Comes To Lunch, and The Hero's Reward.

    • John Duval was miscredited as John Duvall.

    • This episode is a.k.a "Golf Tournament" and "Tuppy and the Terrier".

    • This episode first aired in the US on November 18th 1990.

    • Barmy's full name is actually Cyril Fotheringay-Phipps.

    • This episode draws from three P.G. Wodehouse short stories: Jeeves & The Yuletide Spirit, Episode Of The Dog MacIntosh, and Jeeves And The Song Of Songs.

    Show More Notes

    Trivia (14)

    • According to "Jeeves Takes Charge", Bertie is supposed to be 18 when Jeeves enters his employment.

    • Claude (while referring to Bertie's change of valets): The last one used to pinch his socks. In "Jeeves Takes Charge," we learn that Bertie sacked his former valet, Meadowes, for pilfering a pair of silk socks.

    • "Forty-Seven Ginger-Headed Sailors" was originally performed in 1928 by Jack Hylton & His Orchestra.

    • In this episode, Bertie seeks revenge on Barmy after suffering embarrassment at the golf tournament. In the original short story (Jeeves & The Yuletide Spirit), he's seeking revenge on Tuppy Glossip who had embarrassed him at a swim meet. Additionally, in the original short story, it is Sir Roderic Glossip who falls victim to Bertie's prank.

    • When Barmy is teeing off, you can see a blackboard with all the contestant's names on it, including Bertie & Barmy.

    • For those of you who weren't counting, the bet that Jeeves placed on the elderly men's 100 yard dash earned the Syndicate £1500 (£100 placed on a 15-1 candidate).

    • The music that Tuppy & Angela, Gussie & Madeline, and Aunt Dahlia & Uncle Tom are dancing to at the end of the episode is Happy Days Are Here Again by Milton Ager and Jack Yellen (1929).

    • Biffy: Is it really true you were once engaged to Honoria? Bertie: It is. Biffy: How on earth did you manage to get out... I mean, uh, what was the nature of the tragedy that prevented your marriage? Bertie was engaged to Honoria Glossop in the first episode of the first season, Jeeves Takes Charge.

    Show More Trivia

    Allusions (5)

    • Minnie The Moocher The song Bertie is playing is "Minnie The Moocher", by Cab Calloway and Irving Mills. Hugh Laurie actually played the piano.

    • Mozart The opera Bertie and Tuppy are attending is "The Marriage Of Figaro" in which Cora is singing.

    • Bertie: You know what Kipling said: the F of the S is more D than the M. Bertie is referring to Rudyard Kipling (1865 - 1936), who was a prolific writer, penning novels, short stories and poems. Kipling was popular in the early 20th century. The line that Bertie is shortening is from The Female of the Species (1911), and the full line is "the female of the species is more deadly than the male."

    • The song that Bertie sings is Good Night, Vienna, the title song from the 1932 movie of the same name, starring Jack Buchanan.

    • Anatole: In the words of the so-called poet Shakespeare, 'If you wrong us, shall we not revenge?' Anatole shall have his revenge...ment! Anatole is quoting Shylock's speech from Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice; "If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?" (Act III, scene i)

  • Fan Reviews (6)
  • the whole enchilada

    By cakejatskill, Dec 25, 2012

  • Plum (that's P.G. Wodehouse) would be highly amused and I am certain would approve of this adaptation of his most famous works. Well there's no fault to be find with the casting of the two leads.

    By cryptobuddhist, Aug 25, 2006

  • A delightful, classic series.

    By D-LinkUK, Apr 13, 2007

  • Jeeves and Wooster tells the tale of rich idiot Bertie Wooster (Hugh Laurie) and his buttler Jeeves (Stephen Fry)

    By randy_roes, Jan 28, 2007

  • This is Fry and Laurie at their best in a routine that could have been created especially for them. Wodehouse would have been so proud of their performances.

    By pinklavender, Jan 01, 2007

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