Jennie: Lady Randolph Churchill

Triumph and Tragedy

Season 1, Ep 4, Aired 11/26/74
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  • Episode Description
  • Randolph inexplicably resigns from his high post in the British government and begins acting more and more erratic. Soon, Jennie learns the horrible truth behind her husband's erratic behavior.

  • Cast & Crew
  • Lee Remick

    Jennie Jerome, Lady Randolph Churchill

  • James Cellan Jones

  • Julian Mitchell

  • Tom McCall

  • AndrĂ© Previn

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  • Trivia & Quotes
  • Quotes (14)

    • Randolph (after Gladstone announces his support for the Irish Home Rule Bill): The Prime Minister surprises me. I did not think it possible to be surprised by him.

    • Kinsky: I'm sorry. I was being selfish. I was thinking how busy you'll be. Jennie: I expect I'll find a few hours free from official duties.

    • Randolph (to Jennie): I've got a tremendous new line for my election address, Jennie. The Liberals will never forgive me. I'm going to attack the Grand Old Man for being more old than grand.

    • Randolph (to Jennie): Our lives just don't seem to coincide as much as they once did, do they?

    • Randolph (about Dr. Keith): He's a splendid quack. Recommends holidays for everything.

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    Notes (3)

    • This episode first aired in the United States on October 29, 1975 as an episode of the PBS series Great Performances.

    • Warren Clarke is best remembered by American moviegoers as the brutish droog Dim in Stanley Kubrick's classic 1971 film A Clockwork Orange.

    • Paul Ambrose, who played the young Winston Churchill in the previous episode, plays his younger brother Jack in this one.

    Trivia (1)

    • As was shown in this episode, Lord Randolph Churchill resigned from his high British government position as Chancellor of the Exchequer in 1886 because of disputes with other Cabinet ministers over funding for their departments. He fully expected to be recalled into the government but this did not happen and he was a finished man in British politics even though he continued to sit in Parliament. During his final years, his mental and physical state deteriorated considerably probably because he was suffering from the effects of tertiary syphillis. He died on January 24, 1895. Ironically, his eldest son Winston would die on the same day in 1965.

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