Mystery and Imagination

ITV (ended 1970)
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  • Episode Guide
  • S 5 : Ep 3

    Curse of the Mummy

    Aired 2/23/70

  • S 5 : Ep 2

    Sweeney Todd

    Aired 2/16/70

  • S 5 : Ep 1

    The Suicide Club

    Aired 2/9/70

  • S 4 : Ep 3

    Dracula

    Aired 11/18/68

  • S 4 : Ep 2

    Frankenstein

    Aired 11/11/68

  • Cast & Crew
  • David Buck

    Richard Beckett (Host)

  • Freddie Jones

    Parkes

  • Ian Holm

    Baron Victor Frankenstein/The Monster

  • Joss Ackland

  • Denholm Elliott

    Roderick Usher

  • show Description
  • Welcome to the Mystery and Imagination guide at TV.com. "Mystery and Imagination" was an anthology series featuring 60-min spooky stories from Victorian authors such as Robert Louis Stevenson, Edgar Allan Poe, M. R. James, Algernon Blackwood, Sheridan Le Fanu, and others; this series was produced by ABC Weekend Television until July 1968. In November 1968, the series was renamed "Tales of Mystery and Imagination," was produced by Thames Television, and featured 75-min teleplays of "Dracula," "Frankenstein," and other famous horror novels. A Victorian adventurer named Richard Beckett (pictured; played by David Buck) hosted the series and also sometimes participated in the stories.moreless

  • Trivia & Quotes
  • Notes (18)

    • The short story by Robert Louis Stevenson on which this episode was based was also the basis for a 1945 Hollywood film starring Boris Karloff and directed by Robert Wise.

    • In addition to Roger Corman's famous 1960 film version (mentioned in the review), Poe's classic story was also the basis of a British B-movie of 1949, directed by Ivan Barnett and starring a young actress newly out of drama school and calling herself "Gwendoline Watford". (She soon shortened her forename to "Gwen" and became a British TV star and award-winner during the 1950s.) There was also a famous silent film of the story made in France in 1928. It ran just 48 minutes and was directed by Jean Epstein. His assistant, soon to become a famous director himself, was Luis Bunuel.

    • The title refers to an ancient Hebrew book.

    • This story was adapted for television a second time some seven years later, when it turned up as a segment of "A Ghost Story For Christmas", the once-a-year BBC series of ghostly tales which ran from 1971 to 1978. This version was televised by the BBC on the evening of Christmas Day, 1973.

    • Oscar Wilde's famous short story has been adapted many times for television (including a TV movie of the 1970s starring David Niven) and was the basis of a wartime film made by M-G-M, which unwisely updated the story to contemporary times. This film was directed by Jules Dassin and starred Charles Laughton.

    • Based on the story "Old Mrs. Jones"

    • Based on the story "The Room in the Dragon Volant"

    • This famous vampire story - which predates Bram Stoker's "Dracula" by half a century - was also (loosely) the basis for Carl Theodor Dreyer's classic silent film "Vampyr" and for Roger Vadim's 1960 modern-dress movie "Et Mourir De Plaisir", known in English as "Blood And Roses". A slightly more faithful version was made in England in 1970 by Hammer Films under the title "The Vampire Lovers".

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    Trivia (1)

    • Denholm Elliott was voted "the sexiest man on British television" at the end of 1968 by the readers of a British tabloid daily newspaper. As his appearance as Dracula was almost his only British television appearance that year, it seems reasonable to assume his success was on the strength of this one performance.

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