Postcards from Buster

Step By Step (Hartford, Connecticut)

Season 1, Ep 40, Aired 3/31/05
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  • Episode Description
  • Buster visits a hearing impaired dancer of "Bomba Y Plena", a Puerto Rican dance, while showing Francine and Sue Ellen how to dance the Puerto Rican way.

  • Cast & Crew
  • Marcel Jeannin

    Bo Baxter

  • Norman Groulx

    Carlos of Los Viajeros

  • Elizabeth Diaga

    Mora of Los Viajeros

  • Cameron Ansell

    Arthur

  • Danny Brochu

    Buster Baxter

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  • Trivia & Quotes
  • Quotes (6)

    • Buster: I'm singing and dancing newspaper, I'm loving it!

    • Buster: I'm gonna ride to the concert with Carlos and Mora, see you there!

    • Buster: Is it hard for you to hear while doing gymnastics? Katrina: No!

    • Buster: What's the favorite snack here? Boy: Buñuelos.

    • Buster: What are they? Girl: There 'Pañuelo'.

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    Notes (7)

    • I Forgot To Tell You: Buster explains how hearing impaired people can use the closed captioning to read the dialogue (An episode of "Arthur" with close captioning is shown).

    • Buster and Carlos visits the Guaika school for dance, to learn the "Bomba Y Plena Dance".

    • Karina the dancer, is using a hearing device (A ringing is hear on the background).

    • A fake "Los Viajeros CD" is introduced in this episode.

    • Buster and Mora visits a dance school, to learn Puerto Rican Dance.

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    Allusions (3)

    • Buster: (At the store) "What is the favorite snack here?"
      Buñuelo is mostly a fried pastry, like dough balls. It could be referred as doughnuts.

    • KATRINA: "Is a Pañuelo..."
      Pañuelo is Handkerchief.

    • KATRINA and BUSTER: "1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8......I'll teach Sue Ellen how to tie the Pañuelo..."
      The "Bomba Y Plena Dance" is a symbolic tradition of Puerto Ricans. This dance combines a symbolic outfit that is composed of a typical dress and a colorful "Pañuelo" (handkerchief). The origin of the "Bomba y Plena Dance" is not clearly known, but is believe to have come as a result of the African slaves tradition that started around the 17th century in the town of LOIZA, a small community some 15 miles east of San Juan, Puerto Rico. The residents use to dance Bomba Y Plena, as a way to worship their Gods, while their Patrons did forbid them to do so. Today, millions of Puerto Ricans take part of this mysterious dance and there are "Bomba Y Plena" schools around the USA and Puerto Rico.

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