The Jack Benny Program

Jack Takes Beavers To The Fair

Season 5, Ep 12, Aired 3/6/55
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  • Episode Description
  • In this color episode, Jack loans each of the Beverly Hills Beavers fifty cents when he takes them to the fair. Things start badly when Jack has to be shot down after holding too many balloons. He also gets knocked out on the merry-go-round. He impresses everyone when he swings the mallet and knocks the bell off the top of the meter; it didn't hurt that one of the Beaver sticks him in the butt with a pin. Mr. Kitzel, who's manning the hot dog concession, tells Jack he's a utility player who fills in wherever needed at the fair. They run into him later dressed in a gorilla suit, and introducing the Sportsmen who masquerade as trapeze act the Five flying Finnegans. Jack steps into a cage with a lion, thinking the lion is Mr. Kitzel in another costume. It isn't. On the way out, they pass a hula girl show. The boys want to go in and watch, but Jack says no--until he learns the dancing girl is Mr. Kitzel.moreless

  • Cast & Crew
  • Jimmy Baird

    "Beaver" Bobby

  • Frank Nelson

    Age Guesser

  • Herb Vigran

    Milk Bottle Concessionaire

  • Stephen Wootton

    "Beaver" Stevie

  • Artie Auerbach

    Mr. Kitzel

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  • Trivia & Quotes
  • Quotes (2)

    • Mr. Kitzel: (barker for the Sportsmen's trapeze act) Watch them swing 200 feet in air without a net! The outstanding...the world famous..>Five Flying Finnegans. Jack: Five? Mr. Kitzel, there are only four of them. Mr. Kitzel: It happened last night. We haven't had time to change the name.

    • "Age Guesser" Frank Nelson: (takes quarter from Jack) Thank you. You're 39. Jack: Yeah! Yeah! Say, Mister, what made you say I was 39? Frank Nelson: I got your quarter. Let's both be happy!

    Notes (1)

    • This filmed episode was telecast in color, a rare event on CBS. The network did next to no color programs until it went full color in the mid 1960s.

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