The Name of the Game

NBC (ended 1971)
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  • Episode Guide
  • S 3 : Ep 24

    The Showdown

    Aired 3/19/71

  • S 3 : Ep 23

    The Broken Puzzle

    Aired 3/12/71

  • S 3 : Ep 22

    Beware of the Watchdog

    Aired 3/5/71

  • S 3 : Ep 21

    Appointment in Palermo

    Aired 2/26/71

  • S 3 : Ep 20

    The Savage Eye

    Aired 2/19/71

  • Cast & Crew
  • Gene Barry

    Glenn Howard

  • Robert Stack

    Dan Farrell

  • Anthony Franciosa

    Jeff Dillon

  • Susan Saint James

    Peggy Maxwell

  • Ben Murphy

    Joe Sample

  • show Description
  • The Name Of The Game was a rotating series featuring Gene Barry as Glenn Howard, CEO of Howard Publications and managing director of Fame magazine; Robert Stack as Dan Farrell, a writer for Crime magazine; and Tony Franciosa as Jeff Dillon, writer for People magazine.

  • Top Contributor
  • orswel

    User Score: 2068

    EDITOR

  • Trivia & Quotes
  • Quotes (118)

    • Jeff Dillon: [suspecting that Pat Harris means to ruin a man]: Pat, you ever done this before?
      Pat Harris: I've done everything before.

    • Howard: Come on, I don't get around that much. Dillon: Oh, sure, Glenn. Everybody knows what a steady character you are. Faithful for the last 20 years to the same dozen women.

    • Glenn Howard: It's a long shot. But it's the best shot you've got.
      Dan Farrell: It's the only shot I've got.

    • Glenn Howard: [on Willi Gullen]: He's either a very patient spy or a very bad electrician.

    • Evelyn Smith: [on her imprisoned husband]: Maybe I like to think of him, alone and afraid...
      Glenn Howard: And maybe you want him punished?
      Evelyn Smith: That, too.

    • Glenn Howard: Did you say something about buying me a drink?
      Carter Haines: Hardly. You're buying.

       

    • Herman Allison: This country's in danger, Mr. Howard - and if the almighty federal government ain't gonna do the job, a few of us responsible citizens have just got to step in.

    • Billie Ramsay: [about her brother and his wife]: I won't deny their misery gave me a great deal of pleasure.

    Show More Quotes

    Notes (39)

    • This had a running time of approximately 100 minutes, making it longer than any of the regular series episodes.

    • It has been suggested that Carol Sobieski made an uncredited contribution to the script of this TV movie.

    • Like the 1949 Alan Ladd movie, this television film is adapted from Tiffany Thayer's best-selling 1933 novel, "One Woman".

    • Advertised as an "original" for television, Fame is the Name of the Game was actually a remake of the 1949 Alan Ladd melodrama Chicago Deadline, right down to the identity of the mystery killer.

    • The Tony Franciosa character is chief investigative reporter for a magazine called "People". Of course, there actually is an American magazine called "People" in real life, but there is no connection between it and this fictitious publication. The real "People" was published by Time-Life Inc. from 1974 onwards; it began three years after this series finished.

    • 2nd pilot for the TV series, re-introduces Tony Franciosa as investigative reporter Jeff Dillon, and Susan St. James as research assistant Peggy, and introduces for the first time Gene Barry as publisher Glen Howard. This pilot runs a bit longer than subsequent episodes clocking in at 77 minutes. This episode introduces the jazzy, pulsating theme song.

    • This was the first Robert Stack segment. He would be the lead actor in nine episodes in each season of this series.

    • This was the first Gene Barry segment of the season. Dave Grusin, who is responsible for the show's theme, composes the music for this episode. We find out in this episode that Glenn Howard's zodiac sign is "Leo" and that he actually lives in a penthouse at the top of the Howard Publications building. His living quarters have all of the modern conveniences, including a private elevator and a bar. On the roof is a helicopter pad, shown in this episode.

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    Trivia (74)

    • This marked the last-ever TV directing job of Stuart Rosenberg, who made his big-screen breakthrough with "Cool Hand Luke" the following year, and it was the first TV acting role for Susan Saint James, whose TV debut, on a Bob Hope special, preceded the first telecast of this TV movie by just ten days.

    • One of the earliest TV movies, and the first ever to serve as a sort of pilot film for a future series.

    • Nanette Fabray has her first TV movie role in this film. She was married to Ranald MacDougall, who wrote the script and produced.

    • In this TV movie, which precedes the series by two years, the part of "Glenn Howard" is conceived very differently from the suave Gene Barry character in the series; as played by George Macready, he is a much older man, which only a functional role as the hero's boss.

    • The fashion photographer seen briefly in this episode is played by a real photographer, Frank Bez, in what appears to be his only TV acting role.

    • "The Name Of The Game" was, in its day, by far the most expensive TV series ever produced, with an average episode budget of about $400,000.

    • Although the original 1966 TV movie, "Fame Is The Name Of The Game", had been conceived as a star vehicle for Tony Franciosa and he stars in this first regular series episode, he was to be the leading actor in only six of the first season's twenty-six episodes. His disagreements with the producers of the show and his much-reported "difficult behavior" led eventually to his being fired from the show, although he retained star billing.

    • Tony Franciosa appears briefly as "Jeff Dillon" in this episode, his only cameo appearance in any of the episodes headlined by one of his co-stars. Gene Barry appeared in eight episodes of which he was not officially the star, but Robert Stack never appeared in any episodes where he wasn't the leading man.

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    Allusions (1)

    • Tiffany Thayer's original novel was possibly inspired by the mysterious death, in 1931, of a lady known by the exotic and probably false name of "Starr Faithfull". Her body was fished out of the river in New York, and her diaries and papers revealed to the police investigators that she had had a very busy sex-life, numbering some very prominent citizens amongst her lovers. Her death was registered as a suicide, and thus scandals were largely avoided, despite considerable press speculation.

  • Fan Reviews (3)
  • A PIECE OF TV HISTORY UNACKNOWLEDGED

    By joeydak1111, Jan 26, 2013

  • what episode did susan st james peggy dance for tough guy?

    By bradcoin, Jan 30, 2012

  • Another wonderfulshow that should be on DVD

    By slatteryfan1, Dec 31, 2011

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