The Ray Bradbury Theater

The Crowd

Season 1, Ep 3, Aired 7/2/85
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  • Episode Description
  • A neon sign artist named Joe Spelliner is injured in a car crash and sees a crowd of onlookers quickly gather. Days later he sees another car crash and notices that again the same crowd quickly gathers. He begins to investigate a series of accidents and news footage reveals that the same crowd arrives at every scene. What's more, Joe notices that the faces in the crowd match photographs of people at the city morgue.moreless

  • Cast & Crew
  • Michael MacMillan

    Executive Producer for Atlantis Films Limited

  • R. H. Thomson

    Morgan

  • David Hughes

    Doctor

  • Larry Wilcox

    Executive Producer for Wilcox Productions, Inc.

  • Victor Eartmantis

    Paramedic

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  • Trivia & Quotes
  • Quotes (2)

    • Host: The trouble with having all these things around for years is you stop seeing them. There's nothing new, it's a cliche. You look at it, you don't see it any more. So sometimes you have to make a search, to find something new somewhere, perhaps beyond. But even down there the streets, the people, the cars, it's nothing new. I've seen it all. And yet, and yet...

    • Morgan: Where'd you get these? Joe: The morgue. Morgan: The morgue? Joe: They're dead. They're all dead. Car accidents in the past year. Morgan: But if they're dead, how? Joe: I'm convinced they come back to haunt the places that accidents happen. They're waiting for more accidents to happen. I think they're waiting there, move people that shouldn't be moved. To breathe the air that people need, so that they die. They become part of the crowd.

    Notes (2)

    • This short story was also done as an episode of the anthology series Journey To The Unknown called "Somewhere In A Crowd".

    • This episode is based on the short story "The Crowd" by Ray Bradbury. The story was first published in Weird Tales (May, 1943).

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