The Ray Bradbury Theater

Trivia, Quotes, Notes and Allusions

Quotes (146)

  • Host: It's a new age. Even the coffee machines are talking to us. Maybe the next thing will be they'll tell us not only what to drink, but when to drink. But what if they're wrong. I wonder if old Geppetto had any idea of what notions he let loose on the world.

  • Charles: You should have seen it. Smelled it, heard it. The playground stinks of tennis shoes, blood, dirty bandages. Their mean little faces, with green jelly running out of their noses.

  • Charles: Bob, tell me... Robert Peerless: Yeah, Charlie? Charles: How do you raise a boy? Robert Peerless: Geez, I don't know. What? I mean, you find a cement mixer, you throw him in, you let it run for five minutes, you take him out.

  • Host: You know, it's amazing how fond I've become of the sound of this typewriter's, ah, till the power fails, very comforting. (lights candle) Well like a nightlight when we were kids in a dark room. Remember how it used to be? When we'd wander around our homes and be terrified of the littlest things. Of course it's not true for us nowadays. At the moments like this what we long for is an old warm friend and I have one right here. (takes out typewriter, accidentally blows out camera) Damn.

  • Host: The trouble with having all these things around for years is you stop seeing them. There's nothing new, it's a cliche. You look at it, you don't see it any more. So sometimes you have to make a search, to find something new somewhere, perhaps beyond. But even down there the streets, the people, the cars, it's nothing new. I've seen it all. And yet, and yet...

  • Morgan: Where'd you get these? Joe: The morgue. Morgan: The morgue? Joe: They're dead. They're all dead. Car accidents in the past year. Morgan: But if they're dead, how? Joe: I'm convinced they come back to haunt the places that accidents happen. They're waiting for more accidents to happen. I think they're waiting there, move people that shouldn't be moved. To breathe the air that people need, so that they die. They become part of the crowd.

  • Cogswheel: A place where you know everybody and everybody knows you, and people give you the time of day and look out for each other instead of always looking out for number one. Salesman: You know what you sound like? Cogswheel: No, what? Salesman: A damn fool writer. A nipped-in-the-bud oh-so-sensitive author of books. Probably never published. Have I got you nailed? Cogswheel: I have some stories being considered.

  • Heather: Where are you going? To get a shovel? Mr. Leary: To get a spoon. Heather: What? Mr. Leary: To eat my ice cream. Heather: Daddy! Mr. Leary: That's my name.

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Notes (98)

  • "Fantoccini" is a name taken from another Bradbury work, "I Sing the Body Electric!". It doesn't appear in the original story, which begins after Braling has already made his purchase and doesn't feature a salesman at all.

  • This episode began the series' HBO run for the first two seasons.

  • "Braling" is a recurring Bradbury name, and will later see use in the third season episode "The Coffin", which also involved robots.

  • This episode is based on the short story, "Marionette's, Inc." by Ray Bradbury. The story was first published in Startling Stories (March, 1949). The story also appears in the book, The Illustrated Man (1951).

  • This episode is based on the short story "The Playground" by Ray Bradbury. The story was first published in Esquire (October, 1953).

  • This short story was also done as an episode of the anthology series Journey To The Unknown called "Somewhere In A Crowd".

  • This episode is based on the short story "The Crowd" by Ray Bradbury. The story was first published in Weird Tales (May, 1943).

  • Filmed in Alton.

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Trivia (1)

  • The Leary's refer to Mrs. Nesbitt as "Mary." However, at the 15:45 mark, Drew Barrymore calls her "Luann."

Allusions (3)

  • Xanadu Young Man: In Xanadu did Kublai Khan, a stately pleasure-dome decree... Referencing Samuel Taylor Coleridge's famous poem, Kubla Khan; or, A Vision in a Dream: A Fragment. First published in 1816, and refers to the summer palace of Kublai Khan. The poem ends with the line "A miracle of rare device," also providing the episode title.

  • A Medicine For Melancholy The title of a paperback or hardcover collection of Ray Bradbury stories originally released in 1959. Some of the more famous stories featured in this collection that were adapted for this series were, "The Town Where No One Got Off" and "The Day It Rained Forever". In this episode, there is a paperback copy of this collection seen on the floor next to a tennis shoe during the opening narration sequence.

  • Title: Referencing Byron's poem, "So, we'll go no more a roving." Penned in 1817, it was later published in 1830 in Letters and Journals of Lord Byron.