The Rifleman

The Photographer

Season 1, Ep 18, Aired 1/27/59
7.8
10
9.5
9.0
8.5
8.0
7.5
7.0
6.5
6.0
5.5
5.0
4.5
4.0
3.5
3.0
2.5
2.0
1.5
1.0
N/A
Rate Episode
11 votes
Write a Review
  • Episode Description
  • Abel Goss, the photographer who took Lucas' wedding photograph, is in North Fork doing a portrait of Mark standing in the street. When Goss sees Col. Whiteside and his sidekick Jamison, he recognizes them as the butchers who tortured him and others while he was captive in their prisoners of war camp. When Lucas stops him from killing them, Goss swears to kill those men. Whiteside planned to call Goss out, but he had Jamison shooting from the upstairs hotel window, as his insurance. When the shots are fired, Whiteside is dead, shot in the back, and his gun hadn't been fired. Goss is arrested and at the trial Lucas and Mark have different testimonies. Mark reenacts the scene in the street, and Lucas backs Mark's theory , using the photographic negative Goss had shot of Mark.moreless

  • Cast & Crew
  • Johnny Crawford

    Mark McCain

  • John Carradine

    Abel Goss

  • Paul Fix

    Marshal Micah Torrance

  • Robert Ellenstein

    Bart Jamison

  • Raymond Bailey

    Col. Jess Whiteside

  • Fan Reviews (0)
  • Be the first to write a review!
  • Trivia & Quotes
  • Notes (1)

    • Although already a 20 year veteran of film and TV, Raymond Bailey (Col. Jess Whiteside) was still almost 3 years away from his "breakthrough" role as Dean Magruder on The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis - which led directly to his signature role as banker Milburn Drysdale on The Beverly Hillbillies.

    Trivia (1)

    • For the most part, 19th century photography is portrayed accurately in this episode. The photographer would certainly have removed the lens cover and counted before covering the lens again, and the subject did have to hold still for several seconds - 3 to 30 depending on light conditions and how "modern" the equipment was. By Lucas' time, although photographic equipment had made considerable advances in the 20+ years since the Civil War, there still would've been many photographers who were using older equipment. However, because of dust and motion blur, it is unlikely that a "portrait" would be taken on the street. Also, a "wet plate" (which appears to have been used here) had to be prepared just before the shot and then developed immediately, before it dried. Developing such a picture at a later date was an unlikely option. (thanks to Margie at rifleman-connors)

  • Add a Comment
    In reply to :
    • There are no comments yet. Be the first by adding your thoughts above.