What's My Line?

EPISODE #680

Season 15, Ep 2, Aired 9/8/63
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  • Episode Description
  • Game 1: Miss Marilyn Patch (b. 4/17/1951) - "Ventriloquist, Star of Weekly Television Show" (salaried; age 12; Marilyn's TV show named 'Marilyn and Calico' airs on the CBS-affiliate station WHDH in Boston on Saturday mornings from 7AM to 8AM; Calico is a donkey; Marilyn is exceptionally bright and articulate for her young age; her parents are songwriters and write her show material and some of her songs; Dorothy Kilgallen guessed her line in one set of questions; at Arlene's request, Marilyn sang a short song titled 'We Wish We Had It, But We Ain't'; Marilyn had dimples and her brunette hair was fashioned in "Shirley Temple style" shoulder-length ringlets; she wore a dress with a ruffled pinafore; from Natick, MA) Marilyn Patch is now known as Marilyn Arnone, you can read about Marilyn's career at her web page: http://www.marilynarnone.com/about.htm Game 2: George Jackson - "Tea Taster" (salaried; he works for the Tetley Tea Company; originally from Auckland, New Zealand; currently from Williamsport, PA) Game 3: Hermione Gingold (12/9/1897 - 5/24/1987) (as Mystery Guest) Game 4: Miss Mary Johnson - "Makes Football Helmets" (salaried; she works for the Wilson Sporting Goods Company in Chicago; she adds the foam rubber to the helmets; she is from Elmwood Park, IL) . .moreless

  • Cast & Crew
  • John Daly

    Moderator (1950-1967)

  • Arlene Francis

    Regular Panelist (1950-1967)

  • Bennett Cerf

    Regular Panelist (1951-1967)

  • Dorothy Kilgallen

    Regular Panelist (1950-1965)

  • Hermione Gingold

    Mystery Guest

  • Fan Reviews (0)
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  • Trivia & Quotes
  • Notes (8)

    • MARILYN PATCH REMEMBERS: In May 2006, 42 years after she made her appearance on "What's My Line?," Marilyn "Patch" Arnone viewed this episode for the first time. Below are a few of her remembrances from that special evening. - Suzanne (2006) Marilyn writes: I remember a few things about my "What's My Line?" appearance, even though it happened so long ago and many of my memories of the event had naturally faded. In some ways, watching that little girl was like watching someone else. There is one thing I remember clearly, though - I will never forget just how sick I was feeling during the automobile ride from Boston to the CBS studio in New York City. My parents were driving our blue Chevrolet Bel Air station wagon and they put the seats down in the back and spread a blanket down for me to lay on all the way to New York. Upon arrival in NYC, we checked into our hotel. The Goodson-Todman producers had arranged for us to stay at a brand new hotel called the Americana, which was very exciting. When my scheduled show time arrived, I mustered up my courage, told myself I could do the show without getting ill during it, and went on. Due to my young age, and the late hour at which this game show aired, I didn't know who any of the stars were on "What's My Line?" Nevertheless, everybody was nice to me and I enjoyed myself. I'd forgotten that I'd sung a song that my mother had written. My father passed away in 1972, but my mother, Gladys Arnone Mathieu, found another wonderful companion in her husband of many years, Len Mathieu. I'm grateful that they are both still living. - Marilyn P. Arnone, Ph.D., Syracuse University (May 2006)

    • REVIEW: Welcome to the first live show of the 1963-1964 television season. This definitely was a fun night and the panel wound up with pretty good 3 for 4 record. Things got off to a bang as Dorothy went unassisted in guessing that cute little Marilyn Patch was a television personality. Because of Dorothy’s superb performance, John flipped over all the cards as a show of sympathy. In the second game, guest panelist Tom Poston, who was on loan from the "To Tell the Truth" panel, correctly guessed that the contestant from Williamsport, Pennsylvania by way of New Zealand had something to do with tea. However, it was Bennett who correctly guessed that he was a tea taster. Bennett also did well in correctly identifying Hermione Gingold. Hermione was on the show to promote her latest play. Unfortunately, the panel ran out of time in the final game, so the female football helmet maker won the full prize by default. However, this was still a great start to the new television season. - Sargebri

    • It was quite interesting to see Dorothy smiling as she shook hands with Hermione Gingold. Of course, Hermione was part of Dolly Mae’s growing enemies list which included Jack Paar, Arthur Godfrey and of course, her former friend turned enemy, Frank Sinatra. In fact, Hermione would often appear on Jack Paar’s show and the two of them would hurl verbal barbs at Dorothy. On one occasion, Hermione appeared on his show with a picture of Dorothy that had a toilet seat for the frame. - Sargebri

    • (1) For tonight's show, which was transmitted live, Johnny Olson once again varies his introduction of Dorothy by concluding with the words "...in papers from coast to coast." Also, Arlene - who by this time has recovered from the injuries she sustained in her auto accident earlier in the year - unveils a new and slightly shorter hairstyle tonight. (2) For the first time in over a year, after taking his seat at his desk, John opens the program with the words "Good evening, ladies and gentlemen, welcome to 'What's My Line?'" This opening - which was once a mainstay of the program - had been gradually deemphasized by Mr. Daly in favor of either opening comments to a guest panelist, or his exasperation with another of Bennett's bad puns. In the program's last years on the network, John hardly ever uses the old welcome message at all. (3) This was Tom Poston's first appearance on the "WML?" panel since EPISODE #622 of July 15, 1962 - and also his last appearance as a "WML?" panelist. He will next appear on "WML?" as a mystery guest, together with his fellow "To Tell the Truth" panelists Kitty Carlisle, Orson Bean and Peggy Cass, on EPISODE #840 of December 11, 1966. In an irony of ironies, the "TTTT" panel had been identified that night by Phyllis Newman, onetime panelist on the daytime "TTTT" and by then a recurring "WML?" guest panelist. (4) "WML?" CREW CREDITS WATCH: On the final slide card graphic, while associate director Alvin R. Mifelow and lighting director Gene Ulrich are carried over from the previous season, two new crew members join the "WML?" production staff: production supervisor Milt Myers and technical director Carl Schutzman. Mr. Schutzman will remain in the latter post for the rest of "WML?'s" run on CBS. - W-B

    • TECH NOTES - PART 1: During this season, CBS will begin replacing their old RCA TK-10 and TK-11 television cameras in their studios on both coasts with British-manufactured Marconi Mark IV monochrome cameras. These new cameras, first introduced in the late 1950's and sold worldwide, differed from their predecessors by the use of 4½" image-orthicon (I-O) tubes, as opposed to the 3" tubes on the older cameras, thus providing a somewhat better picture. And as was paramount to CBS by this time, it was manufactured by a company other than RCA. It is this model camera which was used at the time of The Beatles' landmark appearances on "The Ed Sullivan Show" in 1964. They will remain the main cameras in use by CBS until 1965, when Dutch electronics manufacturer Philips unveils a color camera called the PC-60 (marketed in the U.S. under the Norelco brand name) which was distinguished by the use of "Plumbicon" pickup tubes - and whose introduction would forever end RCA's dominance in the color TV equipment field. The Marconis will remain in use on the last remaining videotape-based black-and-white shows on CBS, including "WML?", through 1966. - W-B TECH NOTES - PART 2: As noted, CBS acquired Marconi Mark IV monochrome television cameras this season to replace their old RCA TK-10 and TK-11 cameras. The network, by this time, had a policy of buying broadcast equipment that could be summed up in three words: "Anybody but RCA." Several broadcasting companies, including CBS, had a lingering resentment over what was considered to be RCA's dominance in the broadcast equipment field. It was this factor, plus the low number of color TV sets in American homes up to this point, that partly explains the reluctance among TV stations to "go color" until 1964-1965, which coincided with the introduction of Philips/Norelco's PC-60 color camera and Ampex's "high-band" VR-2000 quadruplex videotape recorder - in short, anybody but RCA. Apart from their mid-1950's special color airings, CBS never really went with color on a regular basis until 1965; also a factor was the bitter failure of their mechanical "field-sequential" color system which was approved by the FCC in 1951 over RCA's electronic "dot-sequential" color system which, after 1953, would become the NTSC standard. ABC, then the poorest of the three networks, could not afford to broadcast in color for many years, and when they did make the plunge in the mid-1960's, their losses multiplied for several more years. - W-B

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