Baby Boy

Follow
Sony Pictures Home Entertainment Released 2001

USER EDITOR

No Editor

User Score: 0

8.2
out of 10
User Rating
2 votes
0

SHOW REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Movie Summary

Director:
John Singleton
Released:
2001
Rating:
R

Baby Boy is a drama going back to the ghetto roots of Boyz n the Hood, the first film from this picture's director John Singleton (Higher Learning, Poetic Justice, Shaft) who after getting away from the genre, saw fit to finally return to it. Jody (rapper Tyrese Gibson in a startling and impressive acting debut) still lives at home with his smoking hot younger mother Juanita (A.J. Johnson) but has plenty of adult responsibilities he's alternately attending to and neglecting, including his children from two separate mothers, such as his beloved Yvette (Taraji P. Henson, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button). In addition to these conflicts, his mother gets a new live-in boyfriend, hulking, tattooed ex-con Melvin (Ving Rhames, Pulp Fiction, The People Under the Stairs) who Jody has less than warm feelings for; his mother wants him out of the house, and Yvette's incarcerated ex-boy friend Rodney (Snoop Dogg) enters Yvette's life again, making it hard for Jody to assert himself.

moreless

Metacritic Score

  • 80

    The New York Times Dana Stevens

    Jody's story is told with so much heart -- and his character is acted with such a winning combination of playfulness, vulnerability and sexual dynamism by Mr. Gibson -- that you ca...

  • 60

    Los Angeles Times Kenneth Turan

    At once too neat and too messy, but films like this are too rare to leave it at that. Ragged but ambitious, it retains a core of genuine emotion -- this picture is doing the best i...

  • 50

    Variety Todd McCarthy

    Can be taken to task for its overt point-making, lackluster style and some late-on dramatic contrivances seemingly dragged in to provide a little violence.

SUBMIT REVIEW

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

    FILTER BY TYPE

    More Info About This Movie

    Categories

    Drama

    Themes

    Coming of Age, African-American Drama, Family Dramas, Social Issues