Bright Young Things

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Released 2003

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Bright Young Things

Movie Summary

Director:
Stephen Fry
Released:
2003
Rating:
R

Bright Young Things is a dramatic film directed by Stephen Fry based on the novel Vile Bodies by Evelyn Waugh that centers on a group of young reckless aristocrats and bohemians in 1930s London as they try to settle their potentially extravagant tastes and wild thoughts with a calm lifestyle. For aspiring novelist Adam Fenwick-Symes (Stephen Campbell Moore), his life, including a future with his fianc'e Nina Blount, is thrown into disarray when his novel is confiscated for being too racy and he makes a poor monetary decision that leads him to not have the wealth to sustain his lifestyle amongst the decadent rabble-rousers. As Adam struggles to gain the future he wants, his lifestyle full of gambling, gossip mongering, and drugs lead to Nina leaving him behind in a bid for security with the repulsive Ginger (David Tennant). An sharp commentary on the time period with wild plots involving quirky characters played by Peter O'Toole, Jim Broadbent, Dan Ackroyd, Imelda Staunton, Michael Sheen, and Fenella Woolgar.

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Metacritic Score

  • 80

    The New York Times Dana Stevens

    Waugh's dialogue, effortlessly catching the lockjaw intonations and facetious mannerisms of the British aristocracy between the world wars, is a gift to screenwriters and performer...

  • 80

    Los Angeles Times

    As faithful to the spirit of the novel, and the era that inspired it, as a movie could be yet still feel as fresh as Paris Hilton dish on Page Six.

  • 50

    Variety Derek Elley

    An easy-to-digest slice of literate entertainment for upscale and older audiences that lacks a significant emotional undertow to make it a truly involving -- rather than simply voy...

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