My Architect: A Son's Journey

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Released 2003

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My Architect: A Son's Journey

Movie Summary

Director:
Nathaniel Kahn
Released:
2003
Rating:
Not Available
My Architect: A Son's Journey" is a documentary about the intimate story of a man's five-year search for the father, a renowned architect Louis Kahn, he barely knew, for the meaning of his father's life and work and for the relatives he'd never met. Nathaniel Kahn was an eleven year old boy when his dad had a terrible heart attack in the men's rest room in New York City's Penn Station. His father died in massive debt. His obituary in The New York Times highlighted Kahn's importance to modern architecture, but no mention of him having a son. Louis Kahn led kind of a double life. Nathaniel Kahn and his cameraman crossed the country and traveled to Israel, India and Bangladesh to see his father's work; the buildings he designed all over the world. Nathaniel interviews Louis' peers, his own mother, and his two half sisters. The film tries to remember the father's importance to architecture, instead of his financial ruin.moreless

Metacritic Score

  • 90

    Variety David Rooney

    This fascinating portrait of an eccentric visionary and his chaotic triple family life is an accomplished, enormously satisfying non-fiction work.

  • 80

    The New York Times Stephen Holden

    The son's search is one of three strands of a story that the movie weaves into a meticulously structured portrait of a complicated man who remains elusive even after key elements o...

  • 70

    Los Angeles Times Kenneth Turan

    Nathaniel Kahn is very much a presence in this film, at times too much so. The title is properly read with the emphasis on the "my," and the work itself is a plea, understandable b...

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    Categories

    Documentary

    Themes

    Biography, History