Pride & Prejudice

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Working Title Released 2005

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Movie Summary

Director:
Joe Wright
Released:
2005
Rating:
PG

Pride & Prejudice, an adaptation of Jane Austen's classic novel, tells the story of the Bennets and society in the eighteenth century. Mrs Bennet (Brenda Blethyn) knows that her husband's cousin Mr Collins (Tom Hollander) will eventually inherit their entailed estate, and she is determined to find husbands for each of her five daughters; Jane (Rosamund Pike), Elizabeth (Keira Knightley), Mary (Talulah Riley), Kitty (Carey Mulligan), and Lydia (Jena Malone). When wealthy bachelors Mr Bingley (Simon Woods) and Mr Darcy (Matthew Macfadyen) come to town, Mrs Bennet is delighted. Much to the dismay of Mr Bingley's snobby, upper-class family, he instantly begins to show affection for Jane. However, Mr Bingley's friend Mr Darcy remains aloof and often insulting, causing Elizabeth to dislike him. Elizabeth's prejudice reaches new heights when she discovers startling information about Mr Darcy, and when he unexpectedly falls in love with independent, witty Elizabeth, he must overcome his pride and redeem himself to Elizabeth in order to win her heart.

Pride & Prejudice is a Focus Features presentation, in association with StudioCanal, of a Working Title production, directed by Joe Wright.

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Metacritic Score

  • 90

    The New York Times Stephen Holden

    Gathers you up on its white horse and gallops off into the sunset. Along the way, it serves a continuing banquet of high-end comfort food perfectly cooked and seasoned to Anglophil...

  • 90

    Los Angeles Times Carina Chocano

    With outstanding performances, including a turn by Judi Dench as the evil Lady Catherine de Bourg, Pride & Prejudice is a joy from start to finish.

  • 80

    Variety Derek Elley

    A movie for the age, and a keeper for the ages, Pride & Prejudice brings Jane Austen's best-loved novel to vivid, widescreen life, as well as making an undisputed star of 20-year-o...

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Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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  • TRIVIA (0)

  • QUOTES (15)

    • (Mrs Bennet pleads for her husband to visit Mr Bingley.)
      Mr Bennet: There's no need, I already have.
      Mrs Bennet: Have? Oh, Mr Bennet, how can you tease me so? Have you no compassion for my poor nerves?
      Mr Bennet: You mistake me, my dear. I have the highest respect for them. They've been my constant companion these twenty years.

    • (Lizzy and Jane talk at the Meryton Assembly.)
      Lizzy: Now if every man in the room does not end the evening in love with you, then I'm no judge of beauty.
      Jane: Or Men.
      Lizzy: No, they are far too easy to judge.
      Jane: They're not all bad.
      Lizzy: Humourless poppycocks, in my limited experience.
      Jane: One of these days, Lizzy, someone will catch your eye, and then you'll have to watch your tongue.

    • (Mr Bingley and company arrive at the Meryton assembly.)
      Lizzy: So which of the painted peacocks is our Mr Bingley?
      Charlotte: Well, he's on the right, and on the left is his sister.
      Lizzy: And the person with the quizzical brow?
      Charlotte: That is his good friend Mr Darcy.
      Lizzy: He looks miserable, poor soul.
      Charlotte: Miserable he may be, but poor he most certainly is not.
      Lizzy: Tell me.
      Charlotte: £10,000 a year, and he owns half of Derbyshire.
      Lizzy: The miserable half?

    • (Lizzy overhears as Mr Darcy insults Lizzy to Mr Bingley.)
      Charlotte: Count your blessing, Lizzy. If he liked you, you'd have to talk to him.
      Lizzy: Precisely. As it is, I wouldn't dance with him for all of Derbyshire, let alone the miserable half.

    • (Lizzy and Charlotte overhear a conversation.)
      Bingley: (about Jane) She is the most beautiful creature I have ever beheld. But her sister, Elizabeth, is very agreeable.
      Darcy: Perfectly tolerable, I dare say, but not handsome enough to tempt me.
      (Later, Lizzy and Mr Darcy debate poetry.)
      Lizzy: I wonder who first discovered the power of poetry in driving away love?
      Darcy: I thought that poetry was the food of love.
      Lizzy: Of a fine, stout love, it may. But if it is only a vague inclination, I'm convinced one poor sonnet will kill it stone dead.
      Darcy: So what do you recommend to encourage affection?
      Lizzy: Dancing ... even if one's partner is barely tolerable.

    • Lizzy: (to Jane) Only the deepest love will persuade me into matrimony, which is why I will end up an old maid.

    • Lizzy: (to Jane) All the world is good and agreeable in your eyes.
      Jane: Not his friend. Oh, I still can't believe what he said about you.
      Lizzy: Mr Darcy? I could more easily forgive his vanity had he not wounded mine.

    • (A letter arrives from Jane from Netherfield.)
      Lizzy: (reading) "My kind friends will not hear of me returning home until I am better. Do not be alarmed. Excepting a sore throat, a fever, and a headache, there is nothing much wrong with me." This is ridiculous!
      Mr Bennet: Well, if Jane does die, it will be a comfort to know it was in pursuit of Mr Bingley.
      Mrs Bennet: People do not die of colds.
      Lizzy: Though she may well perish with the shame of having such a mother.

    • Mary: I think a ball is a perfectly irrational way to gain new acquaintance. It would be better if conversation, instead of dancing, were the order of the day.
      Caroline Bingley: Indeed, much more rational, but rather less like a ball.

    • Mr Darcy: May I have the next dance, Miss Elizabeth?
      Lizzy: You may.
      (Lizzy and Charlotte walk away quickly.)
      Lizzy: Did I just agree to dance with Mr Darcy?
      Charlotte: I daresay you will find him very amiable, Lizzie.
      Lizzy: It would be most inconvenient, since I have sworn to loathe him for all eternity.

    • (Mrs Bennet orders her husband to fix things after Lizzy refuses Mr Collins' proposal.)
      Mr Bennet: So, your mother insists on you marrying Mr Collins.
      Mrs Bennet: Yes, or I shall never see her again.
      Mr Bennet: Well, Lizzy, from this day onward you must be a stranger to one of your parents.
      Mrs Bennet: (to Lizzy) Who will maintain you when your father's dead?!
      Mr Bennet: Your mother will never see you again if you do not marry Mr Collins, and I will never see you again if you do.

    • (Charlotte tells Lizzy she has accepted Mr Collins' proposal.)
      Charlotte: Oh, for heaven's sake, Lizzy, don't look at me like that. There was no earthly reason why I shouldn't be as happy with him as any other.
      Lizzy: But he's ridiculous!
      Charlotte: Oh, hush. Not all of us can afford to be romantic. I've been offered a comfortable home and protection. There's a lot to be thankful for.
      Lizzy: Charlotte ...
      Charlotte: I'm 27 years old. I've no money and no prospects. I'm already a burden to my parents. And I'm frightened. So don't judge me, Lizzy. Don't you dare judge me!

    • Lady Catherine: Your younger sisters, are they out in society?
      Lizzy: Yes, ma'am, all.
      Lady Catherine: All? All five out at once! Oh, that's very odd. And you only the second. The younger ones out before the elders are married. Your youngest sisters must be very young.
      Lizzy: Yes, my youngest is not sixteen. But I think it would be very hard on younger sisters not to have their share of amusement because the elder is still unmarried. It would hardly encourage sisterly affection.

    • Mr Darcy: You are too generous to trifle with me. I believe you spoke with my aunt last night and it has taught me to hope as I had scarcely allowed myself before. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes have not changed, but one word from you will silence me forever. If, however, your feelings have changed, I would have to tell you, you have bewitched me, body and soul, and I love ... I love ... I love you. I never wish to be parted from you from this day on.

    • Mr Darcy: How are you this evening, my dear?
      Lizzy: Very well. Only I wish you would not call me 'my dear'.
      Mr Darcy: Why?
      Lizzy: 'Cause it's what my father always calls my mother when he's cross about something.
      Mr Darcy: What endearments am I allowed?
      Lizzy: Well, let me think. 'Lizzy', for everyday. 'My Pearl', for Sundays. And 'Goddess Divine', but only on very special occasions.
      Mr Darcy: And what shall I call you when I'm cross, 'Mrs Darcy'?
      Lizzy: No. No. You may only call me 'Mrs Darcy' when you are completely, and perfectly, and incandescently happy.
      Mr Darcy: And how are you this evening, Mrs Darcy? (he kisses her forehead) Mrs Darcy. (he kisses her left cheek) Mrs Darcy. (he kisses her nose) Mrs Darcy. (he kisses her right cheek) Mrs Darcy. (they kiss)

  • NOTES (4)

    • Featured Music:
      •  "Dawn" by Dario Marianelli, performed by Jean-Yves Thibaudet (Lizzy walks home reading a book)
      •  "Meryton Townhall" by Dario Marianelli, performed by the English Chamber Orchestra  (the doors open to the public ball and first dance)
      •  "The Bishop" performed by the English Chamber Orchestra  (Lydia and Kitty tell Mrs Bennet about the militia and second dance)
      •  "The Young Widow" performed by the English Chamber Orchestra (Charlotte and Lizzy react to Darcy's insult and third dance)
      •  "Wakefield Hunt" performed by Jean-Yves Thibaudet (Lizzy and Darcy discuss how to win the affection of a young lady and fourth dance)
      •  "The Militia Marches In" by Dario Marianelli, performed by the English Chamber Orchestra (Mrs Bennet, Kitty and Lydia watch as the militia marches into town)
      •  "Arrival to Netherfield" by Dario Marianelli, performed by Jean-Yves Thibaudet and the English Chamber Orchestra (Guests enter Netherfield Hall)
      •  "Another Dance" by Dario Marianelli, performed by the English Chamber Orchestra (Lizzy and Mr Collins dance)
      •  "A Postcard to Henry Purcell" by Dario Marianelli, performed by the English Chamber Orchestra (Lizzy and Mr Darcy dance)
      •  "Can't Slow Down" by Dario Marianelli, performed by the English Chamber Orchestra (Montage of ball activity)
      •  "Stars and Butterflies" by Dario Marianelli, performed by the English Chamber Orchestra (Lizzy leans against a wall in the dark)
      •  "Leaving Netherfield" by Dario Marianelli, performed by Jean-Yves Thibaudet (Mr Bingley returns to London with no hope of return)
      •  "The Secret Life of Daydreams" by Dario Marianelli, performed by Jean-Yves Thibaudet (Lizzie, on a tire swing, rotates as the seasons change)
      •  "Your Hands Are Cold" by Dario Marianelli, performed by Jean-Yves Thibaudet and the English Chamber Orchestra (Lizzy runs from the church in the rain)
      •  "Darcy's Letter" by Dario Marianelli, performed by Jean-Yves Thibaudet and the English Chamber Orchestra (Lizzy wanders the parsonage and Darcy delivers his letter)
      •  "Liz on Top of the World" by Dario Marianelli, performed by Jean-Yves Thibaudet and the English Chamber Orchestra (Lizzy stands on Stanage Edge)
      •  "The Living Sculptures of Pemberley" by Dario Marianelli, performed by Jean-Yves Thibaudet and the English Chamber Orchestra  (The maid gives Lizzy and the Gardiners the tour of Pemberley)
      •  "Dawn" by Dario Marianelli, played by 'Tamzin Merchant (Georgiana plays as Lizzy peeks around the door)
      •  "Georgiana" by Dario Marianelli, played by 'Tamzin Merchant (Georgiana plays the piano as she and Darcy wait for Lizzy and the Gardiners)
      •  "Your Hands Are Cold" by Dario Marianelli, performed by Jean-Yves Thibaudet and the English Chamber Orchestra (Mr Gardiner hurries to London)
      •  "Greensleeves" Hummed by Brenda Blethyn (Mrs Darcy rests on the couch as Bingley approaches)
      •  "Georgiana" by Dario Marianelli, performed by Jean-Yves Thibaudet and the English Chamber Orchestra (Darcy rehearses Bingley on his proposal)
      •  "The Living Sculptures of Pemberley" by Dario Marianelli, performed by Jean-Yves Thibaudet and the English Chamber Orchestra  (Lizzy sits under a tree and Darcy leaves)
      •  "Your Hands Are Cold" by Dario Marianelli, performed by Jean-Yves Thibaudet and the English Chamber Orchestra (Darcy proposes to Lizzy again)
      •  "Dawn" by Dario Marianelli, performed by Jean-Yves Thibaudet and the English Chamber Orchestra (Darcy and Lizzy as for Mr Bennet's consent)
      •  "Mrs Darcy" by Dario Marianelli, performed by Jean-Yves Thibaudet and the English Chamber Orchestra (Lizzy and Darcy discuss her approved endearments)


      Dario Marianelli

    • Groombridge Place, the stand-in for Longbourn, was found by location manager Adam Richards. The 17th-century-moated manor has been a privately held property for  over 400 years by the same family. Fortunately, the country house had just changed hands, and the new owner agreed with director Joe Wright's vision of the film. The owner agreed to delay the extensive restoration he had planned so Wright would get the shabby look of a gentleman fallen on hard times.

    • Filming Locations:
      (Joe Wright was determined to use only location shoots, so just one purpose-built set, the Meryton assembly hall, was used during the 18-week filming schedule.)
      Groombridge Place (Longbourn, interior and exterior, including Lizzy's bedroom)
      St. George's Square (Meryton village scenes)
      Basildon Park (Netherfield Park)
      Montagu's Hospital (Hunsford Rectory)
      Burghley House (Rosings)
      Burghley House, Heaven room (Rosings interior)
      St Mary the Virgin (Hunsford church)
      The Palladian Bridge at Stourhead Gardens (Lizzy runs from the church)
      The Temple of Apollo at Stourhead Gardens (Darcy's proposal)
      Stanage Edge (Lizzy stands on a precipice)
      North Lees Hall (In the distance at Stanage Edge)
      Peak District (Derbyshire tour)
      Sherwood Forest (Large tree under which Lizzy and the Gardiners sit)
      Chatsworth House (Grand staircase, Pemberley sculpture gallery and exteriors)
      Wilton House Salisbury, Double Cube Room (Pemberley drawing room)
      Haddon Hall, Banquet Hall (Dining room at Rose & Crown inn in Lambton)
      Haddon Hall, Dining Room (Lizzy reads Jane's letter)

    • Judi Dench was given 'and' billing in the main-on-end titles sequence.

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More Info About This Movie

Categories

Drama

Themes

large family, love story, love/hate relationships, will they won't they, finding mister right