Song Without End

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Sony Pictures Home Entertainment Released 1960

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Movie Summary

Director:
Charles Vidor
Released:
1960
Rating:
Not Available

Song Without End is a 1960 biographical film about the life and times of Franz Liszt (Dirk Bogarde). Extremely talented as a pianist, he yearns to compose, and also supports the unpopular Wagner; he also has passionate relationships with Countess Marie D'Agoult (Genevieve Page), who leaves her husband to bear his children, and Princess Caroline Sayne-Wittgenstein (Capucine). Liszt's love affair with the princess threatens his professional reputation as well as his life with the countess; and he also yearns for spiritual enlightenment, eventually forsaking all his women to become a priest.

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    Dirk Bogarde

    Dirk Bogarde

    Franz Liszt

    Capucine

    Capucine

    Princess Caroline Sayne-Wittgenstein

    Genevieve Page

    Genevieve Page

    Marie D'Agoult

    Patricia Morison

    Patricia Morison

    Georges Sand

    Martita Hunt

    Martita Hunt

    The Grand Duchess

    Marcel Dalio

    Marcel Dalio

    Chelard

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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    • TRIVIA (4)

      • No-one on the film was satisfied with the original version of the script by Oscar Millard, and when George Cukor took over the direction, he insisted on its being elaborately rewritten. Walter Bernstein, a writer who had been long blacklisted for leftist sympathies, was persuaded to spend some time working on the film, on the understanding that he would not be credited. He later claimed that Millard's script was so bad, it would only have worked if Sid Caesar had been cast as Franz Liszt and the whole thing had been done as a comedy.

      • Although James Wong Howe was the sole credited cameraman on the film, he left the production soon after George Cukor took over the direction, after strong disagreements with him about the visual style of the film. Most of the film was photographed by the uncredited Charles Lang.

      • All piano solos in the film were performed by Jorge Bolet.

      • Although Charles Vidor received sole credit for directing this film, he had only completed three weeks of shooting when he died suddenly (of a heart attack) in June of 1959. The greater part of the film was directed by his friend George Cukor, who refused to take credit. There was, however, a note of thanks to him added to the film's opening credits.

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    • orswel USER EDITOR

      User Score: 62

    More Info About This Movie

    Categories

    Drama

    Themes

    Historical