The Three Musketeers

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Twentieth Century Fox Released 1973

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Movie Summary

Director:
Richard Lester
Released:
1973
Rating:
PG

This action adventure epic, directed by Richard Lester, is probably the best and most well-loved of all the many screen adaptations of the classic Alexandre Dumas novel. Young D'Artagnan arrives in the Paris of the 1620s, his heart set on being one of the King's Musketeers. But he meets - and quarrels with - with three friends, Athos, Porthos and Aramis, and it is not until their proposed duelling is interrupted by the Cardinal's Guards, hated enemies of all Musketeers, that he is accepted instead as their comrade. The naive youngster soon learns that it is the wily Cardinal Richelieu, not the weakling King Louis XIII, who controls France. To further his own power, the Cardinal arranges to steal two of the Queen's diamonds and to expose her affair with the English Duke of Buckingham, and it falls to D' Artagnan and his new friends to save her honour and France's future.

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  • TRIVIA (2)

    • Frank Finlay plays a second role in this film, a very brief one as "O'Reilly" in the British scene, where he is heavily disguised to look as unlike his other character, Porthos, as possible. He took on this second role at the last minute when actor John Bluthal, who was supposed to play O'Reilly, called in sick on the day his one scene was filmed.

    • Although Jean-Pierre Cassel had appeared in several English-language films and spoke the language fluently, he was dubbed in this film (by Richard Briers), as it was felt that his French accent would clash with the British and American accents of the other actors playing French characters.

  • QUOTES (5)

  • NOTES (1)

    • A year after this film's successful release, a sequel, "The Four Musketeers", was released, also to great success. However, these were not intended to be two separate films - Richard Lester made a single film covering the whole of "The Three Musketeers", a film of more than three-and-a-half hours in length. He and the producers were reluctant to cut it down, and so it was divided into two films, with a brief recapitulation of the first film's events added at the start of the second one. Some of the actors were very annoyed and took legal action, which was settled out of court.

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