Umberto D.

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Released 1952

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Movie Summary

Director:
Vittorio De Sica
Released:
1952
Rating:
Not Available
Umberto D. is a 1952 Italian neorealist film directed by Vittorio de Sica about an elderly man who struggles with the hopelessness of daily life. Umberto Domenico Ferrari (Carlo Battisti) marches with other elderly men, protesting for a raise in pensions. The police break up the protest, and Umberto returns home. Umberto is alone in the world, with no family other than his faithful dog. His landlady is angry because Umberto cannot pay his rent and owes her more money than is possible to raise. Umberto pawns his watch, along with several other possessions, but still does not raise enough money. As a way to avoid paying rent, Umberto has himself admitted to the hospital. When he returns to his apartment he realizes his landlady plans to throw him out in the street. His problems are too heavy to bear, and Umberto nears his breaking point, and suicide soon becomes an enticing option.

Metacritic Score

  • 100

    Los Angeles Times Kenneth Turan

    Creates magic of a completely different sort. It makes the unlikeliest subject unforgettable, finding drama, beauty, even poetry in simple things and simple lives.

  • 100

    New York Daily News Jack Mathews

    Universally appealing story that plays as well now as it did on opening day a half-century ago. Maybe better.

  • 80

    Variety

    The ending is happy, but the general effect of the film is disturbing, so compelling is De Sica's description of a man's solitude.

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More Info About This Movie

Categories

Drama

Themes

Classics, Foreign Language