WALL•E

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Pixar Animation Studios Released 2008

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9.1
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Movie Summary

Director:
Andrew Stanton
Released:
2008
Rating:
G

Wall-E is a 2008 movie from Disney and Pixar Animation Studios, directed by Andrew Stanton. The film is about a robot named Wall-E, short for Waste Allocation Load Litter- Earth Class, one of many trash compactor left to clean up earth after mass consumerism left the planet covered in trash and humans were sent into space on “starliners.” The plan to salvage the planet has failed, but one Wall-E robot remains, having saved himself using parts from defunct Wall-Es and apparently developed the ability to feel, as shown by his keeping of a pet cockroach, collecting trinkets, watching Hello Dolly, and keeping a living plant he finds. He soon meets Eve, a probe robot sent to find signs of plant life, and falls in love with her. He saves her from a dust storm in the truck boot he lives in, where she finds his plant, which she is programmed to take and store inside her body and shut down, allowing the ship who sent her out to locate her and take her back. He follows her onto her ship, where humans have become morbidly obese due to inactivity. The captain finds that the plant supposedly in Eve's body is missing and considers her inactive, sending her to be repaired, leading Wall-E to think she's being hurt and going to save her. He causes chaos that leads to them being designated as “rogue robots, but before they are caught they find that Auto, the robot controlling the ship, stole the plant so that humans would not return to Earth, and wants to destroy Wall-E as well. Wall-E and Eve must figure out a way to tell the captain that it's safe to return to Earth, without being destroyed, or worse- stripped of the personalities and affection for each other they've developed.

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Metacritic Score

  • 100

    The New York Times A.O. Scott

    The first 40 minutes or so of Wall-E -- in which barely any dialogue is spoken, and almost no human figures appear on screen -- is a cinematic poem of such wit and beauty that its ...

  • 100

    Los Angeles Times Kenneth Turan

    Daring and traditional, groundbreaking and familiar, apocalyptic and sentimental, Wall-E gains strength from embracing contradictions that would destroy other films.

  • 80

    Variety Todd McCarthy

    Walks a fine line between the rarefied and the immediately accessible as it explores new territory for animation, yet remains sufficiently crowd-pleasing.

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Family Dramas