Comments of the Week: Fringe, The Cape, The Cape, and Fringe

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Last week's discussions were dominated primarily by Fringe and The Cape: Is Fringe starting to resemble Lost, and will the show suffer now that it faces off against Supernatural on Fridays? Is The Cape so-bad-it's-good, or just plain bad? Can anything save it from cancellation at this point? Your thoughts, straight ahead.

Which storytelling style do you prefer: Fringe's or Lost's?

In his story about the January 28 episode of Fringe, (Fringe: Man Versus Machine, January 31), Tim Surette pondered J.J. Abrams's various mythology delivery systems asking whether you prefer Lost's "right from the get-go" approach, or Fringe's more gradual "crack in the information dam that turns into a tidal wave"? Dudekotka declared his preference to be the latter: "When Fringe throws something at you, it's usually a clear expansion of deeper questions we've slowly come to accept and know that the characters are working on finding explanations to. Lost kind of just threw things on a wall and whatever stuck got to stay, until the entire wall was covered with mysteries. Then they just dedicated a season or two to expand a bit on whatever was left." ExodusPenguin thought differently: "I think Lost handled its mythos better. Sure, a lot of mysteries were thrown at the audience right away, but it progressed the story at a much faster rate. Until its third season, Fringe had that awkward pacing issue of one mythos episode for every 4 or 5 "freak of the week" episodes; while still interesting, I always appreciated the mythos episodes 10x more."


Lost was like TV's version of a spontaneous evolutionary leap or an unexpected genetic mutation. It was special. —SFSK8rGrrl


And although she's no fan of people's "propensity for compulsive comparison," SFSK8rGrrl made an interesting point regarding the two fan-favorite shows: "Fringe's writers have access to something Lost's writers didn't: They have the opportunity to benefit/learn from Lost's missteps/errors/overstuffed plates of myth/mystery spinning whilst precariously balanced on bamboo poles."

Can The Cape be saved? Is it even worth saving?

We wrote two stories about the The Cape last week, and neither one had very good news to share. In The Cape Needs a Hero to Save It From Cancellation (February 1), Tim Surette discussed the show and its dilemma of being neither good nor so-bad-its-good, and deemed it a likely candidate for cancellation. Just one day later, NBC cut the series' episode order from 13 episodes to 10 (The Cape Gets Cut Down, February 2). Readers' thoughts on the show seem to be all over the map, the "Summer Glau effect" notwithstanding...

"That's a shame about The Cape. My two kids love that show, as do I. It has its rough moments, but by and large it is one of the few shows in primetime that I don't mind them watching. That must be the problem, not enough gratuitous sex, blood, gore, and filthy dialogue. I have no problem with shows that do meet those low standards, but I do wish there were more shows that we could watch together. I just can't stomach Disney anymore." —jvann67


The fact that NBC ordered five episodes after seeing the pilot is as much charity any network will show in a recession. —ppfclark


"This show is the suckiest suck that ever sucked. And that was a high award to take after The Event. ... The only 'Summer Glau effect' I can see here is 'lending credibility to a show that didn't at all deserve it.'" —CathodeRoy

"I love watching The Cape and I find myself curious to see where they're going with this crap ... albeit charming and delightfully campy crap. ... BUT PLEASE! EVERYONE! Let's not pretend it's good. The fact that NBC ordered five episodes after seeing the pilot is as much charity any network will show in a recession." —ppfclark

Finally, some comments on the comments...


Here's what readers had something to say about this new Comments of the Week story itself (read last week's inaugural installment here):

"(In Shirley voice) Are you being meta?" —IndianaMom

"Pointless pandering." —BarryDalton

"An absolutely wicked idea for an article, and guaranteed to garner the interest of anyone who posts on here regularly." —smithinjapan


Got something to add? Post a comment below or email the TV.com editors at mailbag@tv.com.


TV.com's Most-Commented Stories, January 31-February 6, 2011:

1. Will Fringe and Supernatural Kill Each Other
How will the two shows fare in the ratings now that they're facing off against each other on Friday nights?

2. The Cape Needs a Hero to Save It From Cancellation
Tim Surette discusses The Cape's many flaws... and why it will likely be canceled.

3. Fringe: Man Versus Machine
Here's Tim again, this time with thoughts on Fringe's January 28 episode, "Reciprocity."

4. Community Strikes a critical Hit
Few people didn't love the show's Dungeons & Dragons episode; our commentary comes complete with an animated gif of Annie's seduction scene.

5. The Cape Gets Cut Down
This news doesn't lie: The Cape is almost certainly headed for canceltown.

6. The Vampire Diaries: Caroline and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day Price Peterson was really feeling sorry for poor Caroline this week, as explained in his latest illustrated recap.

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