Doctor Who "The Angels Take Manhattan" Review: It's Called Marriage

Doctor Who S07E05: "The Angels Take Manhattan"

And so it goes, the end of the Ponds on Doctor Who. This story was not one of the Doctor's sacrifices, not one of loneliness and corruption resulting from a lifetime of time travel, not even one of monsters, even though there were monsters in the form of the famous Weeping Angels. This story, the Ponds' last, was one of love and choices, and it rested almost entirely on Amy and Rory.

Like most of you, I absolutely adored "Blink," the episode that introduced us to the Weeping Angels. It's the episode that I insist people who "don't get" Doctor Who should watch, as it is a tremendously told, standalone tale of romance and mystery, of secret messages and terror. Plus there are statues that only move when you're not looking at them, and who doesn't love that?

The thing that I love about the Weeping Angels that somewhat got lost in their subsequent episodes, "The Time of Angels" and "Flesh and Stone," is that the Angels don't kill you. They simply send you back in time to "live to death" and feed off of your time energy. It's a somewhat bleak and interesting way to damn someone, and it got a lot of attention in this episode.

The basics are that the trio was reunited with River Song and the Angels in New York City, and weirdly, their exploits were being tracked and foretold in a book that the Doctor was reading. The Doctor, we learned, always rips out the final page of a book so that the story never ends. No surprise there—he hates endings, he hates seeing his companions age, he hates anything that reminds him of how timeless he is and how mortal the rest of us are. He especially hates that he can do nothing about it. When Amy skipped ahead in the book to check on Rory, who'd gone missing, the Doctor was horrified and insisted she stop. You cannot rewrite time once you've read it, it seems. This is the new "no spoilers."

Side note: I was so happy to see River return! She is such a dynamic powerhouse of a woman.

After River freed herself from an Angel by breaking her own wrist and then lying to the Doctor in an attempt to convince him that they'd changed the future foretold in the book, she clued us in to what marriage means in one of the most moving scenes of this series. Why did she lie about her wrist? "When one's in love with an ageless god who insists on the face of a 12-year-old, one does one's best to hide the damage." "It must hurt." "Yes, the wrist is pretty bad too."

The Angels' newest tactic, it turns out, is to zap their victims into a hotel, where they live out the rest of their lives and the Angels can continually feed on their time energy. Rory, who had just seen himself die alone in the Angels' hotel as an old man, without his Amy, wanted to make a run for it and change his future, but the Doctor insisted that it would take a lot of power.

Not to be cheesy and quote Huey Lewis, but the power of love will do. The love of firecracker Amy and faithful Rory. They ended up committing suicide together in a dark but powerful scene, and given that we all knew the Ponds would be leaving, the mega-happy double date/family picnic scene that followed just felt foreboding and eerie. Especially when the Doctor casually mentioned that going back to the Angels' hotel might rip NYC apart and could never be done. An Angel appeared and sent Rory back to the hotel—you can't undo certain fixed events, and they'd seen Rory die in that hotel. Some things are inevitable, and the Doctor hates that too.

In an emotional scene where no one could take their eyes off the Angel, Amy decided that she would willingly let the Angel take her, in the hopes of seeing Rory again, even though it would mean never seeing the Doctor again. The Doctor begged her to reconsider, a fairly selfish thing for him to do, but she merely asked River to take care of him, tears streaming down her face. (Karen Gillan has said that those tears were completely real, and I believe her.) She said goodbye and was gone.

The episode closed with Amy's afterword to the book the Doctor had been reading, and to her story. She reassured the Doctor that she and Rory were happy, she pleaded with him to not travel alone, and she reminded him to visit the girl who waited. It was the story of Amelia Pond.

For me, this was an extremely touching episode that really highlighted the best parts of Amy's character—her feistiness, her sense of adventure, and her love for Rory. There were great performances all around, but I especially liked hers. I loved that she didn't struggle with her decision to choose Rory over the Doctor—she made her mind up and that was it. Her end wasn't a result of the Doctor's negligence, a quirk of time travel, or her weariness of leading a double life; her end came because she had to choose, and she chose her marriage.

My only complaint about the episode, outside of a few nit-picky time-travel/storyline issues mentioned below, was that the plot was barely affected by the Doctor. He seemed powerless to fix the problems that came up, from River's arm to Rory escaping the Angels, but perhaps that was for the best. It was Amy's story, and it came to a satisfying close for me. Sometimes it's not about the complexities of endless time travel—sometimes it's just about a girl faced with two men she loves and a choice to make.

We'll miss the Ponds, and now that they're gone, we're alone with our ever-unpredictable, damaged Doctor. I can't wait.



NOTES


– Yes OF COURSE the Statue of Liberty would be a Weeping Angel, how could the show resist? I'm willing to bet the writers set this whole thing in NYC just to show that shot of a gaping, fanged Lady Liberty. It might have been a little silly, but try not to think about the huge issues it creates (did no one notice the Statue of Liberty had moved?!)—it wouldn't be Doctor Who without touches like this.

– How about a hand for the amazing evolution of Arthur Darvill's Rory? He went from being a mulleted afterthought of Amy's to being a fully developed, badass, hilarious character worthy of being chosen over the Doctor. His small gestures and reactions often stole the show, and I'm somewhat sad that we didn't get to say goodbye to him directly.

– The creepy giggling cherubs were a fantastic new addition to the Weeping Angels. I don't want the Angels to get overused and become the new Daleks, but I would like to see more of those little guys.

– Was River kidnapped at the exact moment she decided to show herself to Rory? I was a bit confused about why Rory was involved in her kidnapping, perhaps because River and her kidnappers were all wearing the same hats.

– Best line: "What are you doing?" "You know, texting a boy."

– An interesting side note, and possibly a set-up for future storylines, that the Doctor continues to be nonexistent in the databases of the universe. Did he do it so River would get out of prison? Why is he keeping such a low profile now? Why does the show keep bringing it up?

– I also found it interesting that River said she would travel with the Doctor for a bit, but not too long, because there should only be one psychopath per TARDIS. It's nice to see someone acknowledge the reality of how insane a timelord she would actually be. I'd love to see a bit of the two of them, left unchecked by companions. Maybe a Doctor Who After Dark?

Doctor Who "The Angels Take Manhattan" Photos




Are you satisfied with how the Ponds made their exit?






Comments (122)
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I KNEW what was coming (because I have my own, private "previewer" who watches stuff I can't handle, to warn me off it's too hard, or just plain warn me if he thinks I can handle it if I prepare), and I STILL cried like a baby. For a long time.
Thank you to erinahbing for posting the link to the unshot "aftermath"-scene, by the way - I was picturing a "happy ever after" for them, and was quite destroyed when I read that people thought they were stuck in the hotel. NOW I can come up with several reasons why they weren't, but my first reaction was just more tears, and the clip saved my evening. ;)

I didn't particularly love Amy at first (and I have no particular Rose-hangup, she's just a touch too Mary Sue,), but I came to ADORE Rory, and always thought they sold him a bit short - the man had 2000 years of experience, I would have liked to see more of his no doubt awesome skills. :)
The moments when he got to shine made my day, and I thought he and Amy worked better and better together as the series progressed.

Yes, the storyline of the episode was a bit convoluted, but emotionally it all rang true, even the Doctor being "helpless" - the growing concern about the Ponds' aging and their fleeting time with him already had him on edge and unsettled, and when River showed up in the mix and got hurt, that too got to him; sometimes it takes him a little while to rally, sometimes he doesn't WANT to make the choices that have to be made. This time, the Ponds simply beat him to it.

Kudos for a good send-off to a great couple; it was refreshing to have a couple as the Doctor's companions, there's been a LOT of single, pretty girls in the new series, I WOULD like to see something different once in a while; a man, siblings, I don't know - Captain Jack is of course ALWAYS welcome back for a guest appearance - just don't get stuck in "recycled personality/character"-trap, Doctor Who! ;)
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The whole thing with the Doctor being erased happened in the first episode "Asylum of the Daleks." Remember the seen when Oswin erased The Doctor from the Daleks memory to save him but it was revealed later that she erased it from EVERY Daleks mind? Well it turned out she erased it from everywhere in the universe. That's why they keep bringing it up. Because as River said in "A Good Man Goes to War," the Doctor got to big. He was turning into something he didn't/SHOULDN'T be and they want to stress that he's going back to that man that has to introduce himself by saying "Trust me, I'm the Doctor." instead of the man who can turn an army around just at the mention of his name.
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As I mentioned previously, of course, Rory and Amy didn't live in the hotel :)

If you are still not sure, watch this:

"Find out what happened to Rory's dad and the Ponds in this unshot scene by Chris Chibnall."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWU6XL9xI4k

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I feel like I need to stress to many of you that Rory and Amy didn't get sent back to the hotel, the paradox unmade all of that, the time where the Angels took over Manhattan didn't happen. So it is entirely possible for Amy to become a publisher and for them to live happy, and hey maybe even see River as she was a little girl stuck in the 1960's at one point, who knows. I know I enjoy the thought of that.



ALSO, many people in Manhattan were gone so again it is entirely possible for the statue of liberty to be able to move as the population there at that time was virtually nothing.



I just feel a little upset with the response here as I think the episode was beautifully written, and wonderfully acted by Matt, Karen and Arthur. So yeah, I understand that there are a lot of Pond haters (these people are usually the ones who can't let go of Rose and always want her to make an appearence) but that doesn't mean that this episode was anything less that amazing.



But yeah, I'm still feeling the effects of the episode even now, it was brilliant.
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Just like much of the 11th doctors era, I have strongly mixed feelings for this episode, and mostly for the same reason.



I think I must first say that I simply deplore the fact that they are trying to adapt Dr. Who to the american public. Too many cowboy hats, guns, Appolos, Nixons, Geronimos, etc put in there NOT because the story requires it, but to make the show more "american". It is like sacrificing artistic integrity to write "commercial" songs, if that makes any sense in english.



They wanted to get the Ponds away for good, but didnt want to cross the fans by killing them, so they wrote this non-sensical, weak episode and crammed it with a lot of last minute "rules" to justify it.



I have never been particularly a great fan of the Ponds, but I did like them, specially because their story was so well written and played. And that story deserved a better ending. A MUCH better ending than "they died and lived happily ever after".



And quickly introducing Rorys father - a potentially great character, much like Donnas grandfather - just to make us feel the pain of him losing his son and daughter in law? Thats cheap.



As cheap as "dead but not quite".



The reasons they give to prevent the doctor from getting to the Ponds simply doesnt make any sense in the face of the lore of the series. Even if that particular day, week, month, year or even decade was a "fixed point in time", it would not prevent the Doctor from going there, as we have seen him in others "fixed points" before - and even changing them without making a whole city going boom.



Even if we accept the "last minute rule" that he could not get the Ponds out of that time period after reading the last page of the book, it would only mean he had to get to them AFTER that page was written, because only what happened before it would have beein "read". Not to mention he could still "cheat", as he did before, taking the Ponds away and then back again just in time to write that page.



And more, being the Doctor, he would simply not read that last page, prevent it from becoming "read history" (that he had NEVER any problem altering, before, btw) and get the Ponds back to their proper time.



"Timey-wimey" doesnt explains it because it was never a problem before.



So, the Doctor cant get to the Ponds not because the logic of the story demands it, but because the writters doesnt want him to. And that is as cheap as it comes.



And the Statue of Liberty being an angel? Ah, come on! Thats CLEARLY simply another "postcard" moment to please the american audience. It makes no sense, it is irrelevant to the story, it is not even funny or creepy. It is just gratuitous. They could have made that great - like the angels transforming the statue into one of them somehow in order to spread thought the Earth (since every picture would become an angel, etc). But they decided to make it uterly regretable and forgetable.



Even the statue deserved more!



As a little aside, I just HATE what they did to the angels. In "Blink", the angels could not look at each other without becoming stone, and, thus, placed their hands over their faces. They were "defeated" by being forced to look at each other. And now, just to make the writting simpler and easier, they "forgot" that - just as they forgot that someone would certainly look at the statue of Liberty wandering the streets of New York and turn it back into stone in the middle of the streets.



I still tear up when I watch Rose be left behind, when Martha decides to walk away for her own good and when Donna has to forget everything she saw. But the only time I felt something in this episode was the in first couple great phrases in the last monologue - and even that stopped short of delivering the whole emotional punch it could and should.



And they didnt even need to resort to a "dead but not quite" solution, as the Doctor simply nevers get back to people he left behind - Martha, for instance. They could simply get Amy pregnant again, and afraid of what their double life would mean to her child. AND that would still give them a lot of potential stories with the Ponds or their descendents - wouldnt that be great?



The girl that waited and her 2000 years old centurion deserved better, much better.



Hope that the rest of the season gets better than the last three episodes. Dinosaurs was great, but it was downhill after that.
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Why do you think, that Rory was zapped back to the hotel? Rory and Amy made a paradox, the whole thing disappeared, as it has never happened.

The angel in the graveyard was a sole survivor, alone could not keep Rory (and Amy) inside the hotel, even if it was the zap-destination.



And as Amy and Rory lived happily ever after, and were able to deal with the book and write the afterword... then definitely they were not in the hotel.
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Please tell me if you have an answer to this: I understand that New York is some kind of 'time mess' and you can no longer travel there. Fine. But why doesn't the doctor travel back in time to Boston or something and catch a train to the Ponds and they all catch a train back out and take off in the Tardis from there? Did i miss something?
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It's because Amy said her final farewell in the cemetery after The Doctor read the chapter title.



He can't go back to see her because the final farewell in the novel would no longer be the final farewell and cause a paradox. This is why River can go back -- she hasn't read or written the book yet (she only sees The Doctors' upset look when he stops)
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That doesn't make sense. In several episodes, by several doctors, he and his companion see something and are still able to change it. Example the paintings of Vincent van Gogh. They saw the painting with that creature in it. They went back, changed it and the painting changed to one withoud a beasty in it. Seeing it doesn't mean you can;t change it. ANother example Waters of Mars. The doctor had read that they all would die. He ended up saving 2 from death (3 if you count the lady who pulled a trigger to avoid an importand change). Pompei was a fixed point, everybody was supposed to die, still he saved 1 family. And then there are the several times rory died but came back. And then there is older Amy. The guys where to late to save young Amy, which made them bump into a bitter older Amy. They saw her, talked to her etc. So that should have been much more harder to change then just reading a life in a book. The doctor CAN change and rewrite lives even if he knows how it ends originaly. That doesn't mean he SHOULD. But he CAN. The episode was filled with plot holes by ignoring older episodes, of several doctors and simply undoing things that where establish before. I also think the episode was badly written. At the very least the doctor should have admitted that he could go back somehow and get them back somehow, but he would chose not too because the book showed they where HAPPY. And why change that and risk timey whimey trouble just for his own selfish reasons? That would have made much more sense if he had confirmed that. That wouldn't, opposed to couldn't.
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Sorry for typo's and misspelled words. Please ignore the errors. I am dyslexic and english is not my native language. Also I was being rushed when typing this so I had no time to reread it. Thanks in advance.
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I expected one or both of the Ponds to die, seeing as how they kept saying it was sad.. but I'm glad they didn't, I see that as a major cop out.. don't entirely like this never get to see them again thing, I hated when Rose got sucked to another universe and when Donna had to forget him or her brain would explode.. but I'm glad neither of them died and it was sweet how Amy chose to be with Rory like that.. bittersweet episodes. Christmas special can't come soon enough.
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No, I didn;t like this episode. Too many holes and loose ends. Who was that millionaire? Why was River there? Why Rory? It was just a little messy writing I think. Time travel was used as a deus ex machina. Once you can travel back in time to save someone, the next you really really can't. You can go back to ancient china to adjust the writing on a vase, you can't go back a few weeks in time to stop rory from being kidnapped? Oh well, I thought the Ponds had overstayed there welcome anyways. I thought the full on nerd-love look of Amy (red hair, dark gaze, quircky) a little over the top this season. I'm looking forward to the next companion.



And I don't like River and her whole storyline. he characters themselves don't even take an interest in her except for the doctor who plays it. She's Rory and Amy's daughter, but there is no connection whatsoever. She didn't let a tear when her parents died an excrutiating death in a hotelroom that was a prison for them.



Not to mention the fact that Amy (red straight hair, dark gaze) and Rory (brownish straight hair) are really pretty/handsome. River looks like a bored accountant of an employment agency. Not that hot. I think the doctor (not handsome) deserves better.



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I love Doctor Who and it's definitely my number one show; but I have to say that this episode seems to have lots of story problems.



So, the statue of liberty is an angel. I have to imagine that in NYC at least one person is always looking at the statue of liberty, not sure how a giant angel could get very far without ever being seen.



The paradox destroyed the hotel and now the tardis cant go back to NYC in that year. When Rory and Amy get sent back they cant go to the hotel to be trapped because it is gone and Amy says in the afterward that they lived happily so clearly they weren't stuck in the hotel; not to mention River had access to Amy to send the book to her. So why can't to doctor go to NYC the year after, or several years after? He goes there for the Daleks invade NYC. Why cant Rory and Amy just leave NYC and go someplace else where the Doctor can meet them.



Anyway I appreciate that the writers needed to write the pair out of the story, let's just say my suspension of disbelief isn't satisfied.
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I only just started watching this season and I knew I shouldn't have gotten attached to the Ponds. Nope, it killed me.
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This wasn't a very good episode for me, Rory getting taken reminded me of Radar reporting Col. Blake's plane getting shot down, it's just a thing that happened to make sure we can't bring the characters back. I had a lot of other thoughts on this one, so I'll just post them as a review, but I must say that I would have been much happier if Rory and Amy had just left the Doctor in the last episode instead of wasting our time with a half-baked romp and a ripoff ending like this.
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The Ponds' exit was right up there with when The Doctor lost Rose. It broke my heart in teeny tiny little pieces. This show sure does know how to rip my heart out of my chest.
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Damn, that was sad. I will miss Amelia Pond terribly.
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Guys, the Statue of Liberty was "closed for renovations" for much of 1938... Just read that online, and it killed me... That was a nice touch...



I was blubbering throughout the episode, and I am going to miss the Ponds. I do feel really sad for Brian though, sitting at home, watching the plants and hoping they will someday come back. That just breaks my heart even more...
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Moving though it was, I must say I do not understand why Amy and Rory need to be gone forever...

When reading from the book, the line Amy reads before the Doctor stops her is to the effect that he breaks something in the future. Later it is revealed that he has to break River's wrist. Except he doesn't - River breaks her own wrist. The Doctor has nothing to do with it - in fact he refuses to do it. So what Amy read is not what actually happened...

Likewise the grave stone at the end. It doesn't prove that Amy and Rory never saw the Doctor again. It merely proves that some time in the past they both died in New York. For all anyone knows, the Doctor could travel back to 1939 (ok, 1938 is out, but they could easily survive for a year - Rory survived for 2000 years after all), pick them up, travel with them for fifty years, and then drop them both back in New York just in time for their deaths. Simple.

So what is wrong with my logic?
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She was reading the dialog, and I thought it was the dialog they stated just before he approached River. Not so much "why did you break that" but "why do you need to break that"

But I could be wrong.
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I just rewatched that scene and it looks like you are right. What Amy read was that the Doctor said he had to break something. She did not read that he actually did.



But I still think my point about the grave stone is accurate. Nothing is said or written that the Doctor can never see them again. Only that he cannot go back to 1938. He should be able to go to some time period after that, however, when they are still alive.



For that matter, how do we know Rory and Amy are in 1938? The Angels can send people to any time period. In Blink, the Doctor and Martha got sent to 1969. Someone else got sent to 1923 or thereabouts. Where you wind up is supposed to depend on what Angel touches you. The angel in the graveyard could be any angel, and could have sent them anywhere. Someone as talented as the Doctor should be able to find them...
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Really good episode. Did anyone else remember that that's what the weeping angels do? I was a bit disappointed that Amy not being able to have more children wasn't addressed.
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Maybe they adopted after all. But you're right, she should have written it in her afterword...
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The episode was brilliant. And the ending was verry sad. Yes there were some mager plot holes but I'm choiseing to icnor them in favor of the Ponds hartbreaking send off. And other then that it was great fun to watch. And had me crying my eyes out towords the end.
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great episode, farewell ponds... you will be missed.
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Excellent final episode for the Ponds. I couldnt have written it better in true Dr Who style. The small angels totally creeped me out! And the thought of a human eternal battery farm for the Angels was chilling( only the Brits can think up such creepiness :0)

Am glad Amy stayed with Rory

Anyone know anything about the Dr's new companions or will they be doing standalone episdoes with different companions like they used to in between companions?
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"Only the Brits can think up such creepiness" Um, have you heard of a movie called "The Matrix"?
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The whole 'having been forgotten' thing is a set up for either the end of the series or Matt Smith's run as the Doctor. "The Wedding of River Song" ended on a very particular note: the fall of the eleventh, the place where all questions are answered and answered truthfully. Doctor who? "Asylum of the Daleks" ended with the Daleks chanting 'Doctor who? Doctor who?' Just like River said in this episode 'Doctor who?' It seems to me its all pointing in that direction to the end of the Doctor (or Matt Smith), especially when you remember how upset River was when the Doctor used a little regeneration energy on her wrist, that wasn't so much anger as fear, though I very much doubt we'll be told the Doctor's name but you can dream.
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I thought Amy and Rory's departure was sad but the thing that annoys me is the fact that most of the companions of the revised season can never return:

Rose - stuck in a parallel universe

Donna - can never remember the Doctor without dying

then there's Jack, Martha and Mickey who are up in the air as far as returning is concerned because Martha and Mickey have expressed the desire to live their lives instead of travelling with the doctor. Still, the pond's exit was both sad and sweet.
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Rose can come back any time the wrighters feel like it. Hell she has 10.5 over there with her. Are you trying to tell me that he can't figger sout some safe way to get her back.



Rose it traped. But as the Doctor would say "There's always a way out."



Donna. Well that's a little harder. But since the 11th Doctor hasn't met her it would be ok for him to be around her so long as she both dosn't get his name and he dosn't let her see the Tardis.



And if it took me less then a minute to figger out a way to bring those charters back then I'm sure the brilliant show wrighters can do it if they feel like it.
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at the beginning of the episode as the detective gets in the building there is a sign on the building that says health in greek and there is the medical symbol(the rod of asclepius)as well,was the building a hotel or a hospital?
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I'm really looking forward to the new companion, actually. Don't get me wrong, the Ponds have been really great and I'll miss them, but it is time for a change. I think it'll do some good for the series to have some new blood and new people around. This season has been pretty good so far but I have to say that last season was a bit below the average. So here's hoping that the new companion will breathe some new life into the show (please, let's not have another Martha, please!)



I liked the episode and was happy that it was Amy's choice in the end and not the Doctor's. One thing that struck me was when River told the Doctor that she's a professor now and he seemed quite worried to me. She introduced herself as professor Song the first time we saw her in the library, so I guess River will be leaving soon as well. So much heartbreak for the Doctor, but that's what usually makes this series so damn fine!
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Answer for that question, is in the Library episode *Spoiler from the past* she was a professor and an architect when she dies in the library, and the Doctor preserves her in a databank.
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Yes, I know, I just watched it again a few months ago :) What I meant was that the Doctor knows that now that River is a professor (from the first time he met her) he must know that there isn't that much time left as he knows her faith. I think it might be the proper season finale, the goodbye between River and Doctor.
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Its just a story, in the doctor who universe the logic has traction, just not here. enjoy the bittersweet story. i love how even rorys dad is a pond, even though hes a williams, i love the name pond....
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I liked the episode, but I also thought it was cheap writing. 1 there was no real explanation as to why the angel survived. oh,it ssurvived! how? that better be explained in the future, it's a huge plot-fall. its a quick ending, like in the horrible six-fi d-rated movies... "how do we end this?" "lets kill them/get rid of them" UH I could have thought of that. lets be creative. lets make it something that goes "WHAT?" and not in the "HOW DID THAT HAPPEN? WAIT YOURE NOT GOING TO EXPLAIN IT?! WAIT WHAT? NO I DON'T UNDERSTAND." it was quick. way too quick. like "shit we could have just killed them. there's only 5 minutes left to kill them in the episode.. oKay bring it back and kill them!" it's cheap fucking writing to have it that quick, and then with NO explanation. I loved the emotion. the emotion was great. but you thank the actors for that. The writing in the end of the book was great, creative, and made up for how sad it was. but still, not that great of an actual leave for Amy and Rory.

also, it seemed like they were stuck in the building...... hoooooow can Amy be a publisher? they usually like, need an office and employees.. also if Rory died by himself.. did they rewrite time again maybe? so he didn't? are they stuck at that fixed point in time forever, so it doesn't move forward? understandable and I might've missed that part, but if time does move forward.. thhhheeeen we can totally go back and visit the ponds at some point!
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That Angel wasn't in the building. It was somewhere else in Manhattan. Across the street? Anywhere. Doesn't matter. At no point did they say they destroyed all the angels. There's nothing here that needs to be explained.



No hotel. No Rory dying by himself. Paradox unmade all that.



All fixed point in time means is that it can't be changed (see the Impossible Astronaut).
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Actually when they proposed the paradox, the did say it would destroy all the angles. The did not, however, explain what they meant by "all". All in the building, all in the timeline? In any case, I agree with Annie.
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I'm not sure, but I think he said that it *could* destroy them all, and I assumed that he meant all the ones in New York at that time.
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Well, the thought that it could mean all the angels in the universe never would have occurred to me. That's just silly.
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Well, it was an paradox so a surviving angel is plausible or maybe it was wearing a helmet at the time.
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and if it is a fixed time, I feel that's due to the angels, and instead of the angels feeding off that energy I think they'd be pouring so much energy into keeping it fixed time they wouldn't have any energy for themselves.

alright, so say it WAS that there was just so messed up time energy by itself and it just had to do with rips in space, couldn't the angels just feed on that mass amount of energy? are they really that stupid? wouldn't they want more paradoxes to create more time energy to feed off of that energy itself?

the only way to explain it would be a lack of time energy. and they need more of it from humans. saying that fixed time would be due to a LACK of time energy makes sense.

then again I'm not a theoretical physicist, and I know I'm not using the correct terms.
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It's a weird feeling about them going, it's sad, but at the same time not. They lived a long life together, the fact that The Doctor doesn't get to see them again is the only really sad thing. They didn't die young or tragically, so there's no reason for us to grieve really. I won't say I didn't tear up because that good bye was moving, but it wasn't grief tears.

Just a point; the people who are poking holes in the Statue of Liberty weeping angel are funny. It's a show about aliens who time travel, but the reason it's unbelievable is because in NYC the SoL is always being watched, or wouldn't someone have noticed it having moved. It's nice to know where the lines of reality are for different people.
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Also, has no else noticed that Amy lived 5 years after Rory himself died? That means she was probably alone when she typed up the afterward, if she typed it only a little while prior to her death. She may have written it shortly after all the events had concluded.
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I recall Amy being older than Rory though. not sure if it was by 5 years though.
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I assumed they were the same age since they were in school together. 5 years difference is a lot when you're a kid. Although she did tool around with the doctor for a while before the wedding. I wouldn't have thought it was 5 year though.
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I loved the episode, but I kind of feel as if it left me with a gaping hole in my heart. Rory and Amy clearly were running out of time when the Doctor talked about in the last episode about how some of his companions died. But to see their end come so soon was almost as disappointing as it was sad.



With some of the other companions, we were at least given the opportunity for closure knowing that their lives have gone off in separate directions exactly the way they wanted them to (ie. Martha, Mickey, Rose). However, Amy was forced to choose between her husband and her future, and quite naturally, she chose Rory. Although it is far from a first in the series, never having the ability to see a companion again is really depressing.



How far off the rails can the Doctor go because of something like this? Can't wait to find out!
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I will certainly miss the Ponds but I am happy that they got to live together to quite a ripe age!

Liked the episode and can't wait till Xmas!!!
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Farewell Ponds! I loved that episode - from the beginning I was anxious to see how they would leave the doctor. When I saw old Rory in that Hotel room I was really, really afraid that would actually happen.

Thankfully they could grew old together. Moffat was right, it was an heartbreaking end. Although I almost cried the whole episode, I'm happy how it was solved.

I wanted them to be together at the end (rather in their house with their friends, Rorys father and maybe another child but well...) and they were. Not in 2012 but what does it matter?

But, like someone asked before: can't the doctor or River visit them?

I liked River in that episode - she was tough and one feels she really loves the doctor.

I still feel like crying(maybe because I watched the episode only moments ago) - Amy farewell was very sweet and emotional.

I hope Oswin/Clara(?) will be as good as a companion like she was (no one will ever be better for me).



And the statue of Liberty was a funny idea. I know, it wouldn't be possible but who cares?
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Right before Rory got zapped by the last angel, the Doctor said that New York was such a mess of time energy that even attempting to back there might destroy it. Therefore that whole area became a fixed point in time; a place where he could not travel and no one else could leave. Rory leaving was a permanent event, and Amy going back with him could not be rewritten. Officially, they are gone. It's really saddening.
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The Doctor is lazy. Park the Tardis in London and take a boat.
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Or use River's wrist device: a motorcycle through the traffic.
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I thought something similar. Park the damn thing outside the turmoil and walk, bus, bike, train, etc. in.
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... and risk creating a paradox, since Amy couldn't ever say goodby to The Doctor ever again.



Remember, the last chapter in the book was titled "Amy's Last Farewell" -- which the Doctor read. He cannot go back to see her, lest she accidentally create a paradox by simply saying goodbye again (and blow the living hell out of New York.)
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Ah, okay, thanks. You're right, it is really sad. The Doctor will have a hard time now, I think.
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Nothing but manly tears were shed by me when I saw those last scenes. I, like many other Whovians, will miss Amy and Rory. They definitely go down as one my favorite Doctor Who companions.



The Statue of Liberty as a weeping angel. I mean come on why not? I lost it when I saw that shit. That was freakin great.
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Actually, the Statue of Liberty was the stupidest thing of all. Can you imagine any time, day or night, when somebody doesn't have their eyes on Lady Liberty? She's one of the most visited tourist attractions around, for friggin sake. Heck, for much of the time, there are people crawling around INSIDE her, and their eyes are definitely open.
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Tears had to be. So almost tears has been. Especially in the last part. If they went on to reliving the tale of Amy and Rory my house would probably be a swimming pool by now. Lucky me, they stopped and I stopped my own tears.

Spectacular, that Moffat. Steven is the one I love to hate but, at the same time, I can't stop adoring him. Does a conclusion exist better than this? I'm telling you, I was afraid to be disappointed because we waited for this episode since the news and the rumors have started. The hype was really great. And when the hype is greater than the episode, well, for sure something went wrong. Very wrong.

Of an unique intensity, all the characters work.

It is sad seeing The Doctor passing through the joy of being with his best friends in a day like another in New York (Englishman In New York ) and then his desperation because he can't hold them with him. That look in the graveyard. That broken and destroyed "no" in front of the headstone. The void of loneliness that you can read in his eyes when he sits on the steps of the TARDIS.

Amy's choice: she chooses the man she loves but preserving a place in her heart for her Raggedy Man. She advises him to go on, to find the small and sweet Amelia and to tell her a small story. And here the saddest point: reliving the Ponds's tale through her words.

Beautiful end. Moffat succeeds in also avoiding the physical tragedy giving to all the characters great emotional moments that strike you to the heart if you are like me. I'm tied up to the Ponds and I'm practically tied up to Eleven and, as him, your heart broke in little pieces when Amy makes the choice to go with Rory closing her door with a yearning goodbye to her Raggerdy Man. That's why, maybe, I will always love this mid-season finale, no matter how sad it was for me. It was so good to have River around both as a wife and as a daughter. Melody Pond/Malone has to take care of the Doctor, as her mother ask. She doesn't cry, she makes strength even if you can read well on her face the sorrow to lose them. I'm also satisfied that this wasn't an hour dedicated to the Weeping Angels. Maybe that's why I found them a little less terrifying than usual. This was the last journey of the Ponds, their swan song. Not an episode about those monsters.

A touching and exciting story, dear Arthur Darvill and Karen Gillan. I wish you guys all the best in the future. Bye Amy. Bye Rory. "I hate endings".
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One thing I forgot: The Doctor gave regeneration energy to River. Does that mean he gave away one of his regenerations?

If he has, does that regenerative energy given off to his seperated hand by tenth Doctor David Tennant also count as one regeneration lost?

If the answer is yes in both cases it would mean that theoretically there won't be 13 Doctors. Just 11. And since we are at eleven, won't that bring up some interesting storyline for the 50th anniversary in the second half of the season?
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You forget. River gave the doctor all of her regeneration energy in Lets Kill Hitler.

Its unknown if it ALL went towards healing him that once. Or if he now has a few more regenerations under his belt as a result.
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You are right. BUT the Doctor running out of lives would be more interesting than just having him have some extra, so the assumption that Rivers Energy went into just keeping him alive instead of giving him extra regenerations seems more likely.

With the Doctor coming close to the original amount of regenerations believed to be possible there has to be a story about that somewhere.

Imagine the 13th Doctor (or the 11th as my play of thoughts suggests) being poisend (something like the tenth at the end of his time) and realizing that there are no regenerations left. If you give the impression of a last season this could become something very thrilling, don't you think?
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Except, your assumption that 13 is the cap is wrong. That has been addressed in the series before. Moffatt basically already retconned the 13 cap within the show itself. I can't think of which episode it was, but there was a conversation about that in which it was stated that the Doctor could regenerate endlessly theoretically.
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Confirmed to be a random flip comment. Not a real number.
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In death of the doctor (SJA) penned by Davies, Clyde asked how many times the Doctor could regenerate, and he responded 507
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"One psychopath per TARDIS, don't you think?" <= Best line.



This was a great episode and a great farewell to the Ponds. I will miss them. I hope Jenna-Louise Coleman will have such a great chemistry with Matt Smith as Karen Gillian and Arthur Darvill had. Too bad we will have to wait almost 3 months for the Christmas Special.

Best of luck to Karen Gillian and Arthur Darvill in the future. I hope to see them again elsewhere.



About the statue of Liberty. I never thought about that when I read the Angels where going to take Manhattan, but the very first moment the statue appeared in the background I knew. I was like "No, you're not". Just great!

BUT in the scene on the roof when they talked about creating that paradox, it bugged me that through most of the scene no one looked at the statue of liberty-angel. Great scene but they forgot that someone had to look at it.



In your review I believe you are wrong about one important thing: The angel did not send Rory back to the hotel. The hotel was wipped out by the paradox, the angel that was left was just a survivor, as the Doctor said. Rory also did not die in that bed after all, as he was with Amy all the time as you can see from the afterword.



The question that remains for me is: What happend to the angel on the graveyard? Did they just leave it there?
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Plus the thing was shaking the whole building walking there. Seriously? In the city that never sleeps, these earthquake like steps would go unnoticed?
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I thought the same as you did about the Statue of Liberty. Both not thinking of it until they first showed it in the background of the usual NYC skyline (with an "Oh no! They wouldn't, would they?") and then also the "why isn't it moving?" plot hole with them not looking at it on the roof. (Perhaps their contemplating the paradox was enough to slow it down.) Still a great episode though.



I agree with you that they both went back in time to the same time period, but not the hotel. Otherwise their sacrifice would have been in vain.
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I think one of them was always facing it.
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Rory death count: 8

Depending on what you count of course. That's almost as many deaths as the doctor...
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One thing though, I think that Amy and Rory jumping from the building actually did destroy the hotel and most of the angels. Amy mentions that they had happy lives which makes me think that when they got sent back in time they just got sent back and were free but stuck there because the Doctor could not follow.



This a sad ending. The whole season up to now was Amy and Rory debating a normal life compared with a life with the Doctor and in the end, a normal life was sort of forced on them by the Angels. They died together in the end which is kind of satisfying because in many ways their whole journey has been about them and their love for one another. All the fighting and battles, the deaths and ressurections, and in the end you had just one more before they finally were together.



Also, given the fact that they traveled for so long with the Doctor by their perception, they may have actually lived longer lives than depicted on the grave.
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I LOVED this episode. I think it had just about everything you want from Doctor Who - wit, intrigue, WEEPING ANGELS! and plenty of raw emotion. Going to miss Amy and Rory so much - they are by far my favourite compainons!



As for the Note about the Statue of Liberty being a Weeping Angel (LOVED IT!!!) - of course no-one would have noticed it had moved. How else would it move in the first place?! ;)



ROLL ON CHRISTMAS!!!
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Every time I tried to figure out that whole timey-wimey, time-continuum thing, my head hurts. So I'll just say that the Ponds exist was nice, not really memorable, but still very heartfelt. I didn't understand most of the actions of some of the characters here (why did that collector kept such a dangerous 'prize' in the first place? Why did he need to hire private dicks at all? Why did Rory enter that hotel? Seriously, how can NO ONE in the city seemed to care about Lady Liberty walking around through Manhattan - this ain't "Ghostbusters 2"!?), but I liked the story because, really, it was all about the Ponds, and that's the way it should be.

However, one weird thing to mention: I never felt like this season really started. This actually was, for me, the conclusion of season 6. So, even though I'll miss the Ponds, I cannot wait to have the Doctor entangled in new arcs. Starting this Christmas, season 7 can finally begins.
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River also did remark that "it's almost as if someone has gone around deleting himself from every database in the universe" coupled with all of the time travel we DON'T see this season (can we call Rory's dad the lost companion) that handily distributes the weight of his erasure away from resting all on the actions of the single Dalek. Also, maybe go back and watch the Davies era. My count so far, give or take, is Moffat has about half a dozen throwaway episodes to 20+ excellent episodes. Three out of four Moffat episodes are at least fun to watch, and often excellent. Russell, by hideous contrast, made a good fifty percent of his episodes, entire seasons almost unwatchable. Even as far back as 2005 Eccleston and Piper had to suffer through a couple of stinkers (Slitheen much?) and the best episodes were written by Moffat (Empty Child, Doctor Dances). Hell, Moffat created Jack Harkness AND River Song AND the Weeping Angels. Not a thing Davies did will have a lasting impact on the mythology, and the Smith years are going a long way towards proving it. Objectively, there's no contest.
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persuaded B)
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It could be the Dalek deletion just Gavin the Doctor the idea. And then went and started deleting himself from other databases. I believe hes lived a century since the whole Lake Silencio incident



Or the Dalek deletioN itself did delete eveything
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The Dalek database was only one of them. In a past season he also deleted himself from UNIT and apparently Earth's databases.
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I was hoping - so very much - for a Marth exit. Not, mind you, in terms of them leaving by CHOICE, but I wanted it to be a thing of 'We'll be able to see them again'. Because truth be told I desperately want to see them again. But nay, Steve Moffat is not THAT kind. Despite how devestating it was, I thought it was beautiful. It kind of makes up for the pretty silly divorce plot in Asylum of the Daleks, which seemed an out-of-the-blue manipulation of what has been a surprisingly well-told love story between Amy and Rory. I loved the companions best when the show emphasized how much they had grown to love one another - compared to early season 1, when Amy thought she loved the Doctor, and it took Rory dying (which became the best running joke?) for her to realize she loved him. Which might be an overused concept, but the fact is, their romance has been strangely powerful. At least to me, and it takes a lot for me to actually give a damn about romantic arcs sometimes because it tends to be limited to 'I appreciate the way your face has arranged itself over time, let's base our love on mutual respect for one anothers faces' a whole lot. I didn't realize how invested I'd become in their characters, both as seperate characters and as a couple. So while I think it was a powerful goodbye, I wanted a Martha exit. Knowing we'll never see the Ponds again (unless Moffat works some miracle, which, please, God, Moffat, work some miracle) is pretty upsetting. It's BITTERsweet. Emphasis on the bitter because while it's sweet that they got to grow old together...I'm feelin' bitter about the whole thing.







Looking forward to Oswin, though. I mean, is the prospect of her meeting River not AH-MAZ-ING? Can you imagine the conversation? Man, I have high hopes for Oswin. Especially the banter between her and River. The River, Doctor and Oswin in one room - PLEASE let her be the same as she was in Asylum of the Daleks. So much potential for awesome dialogue.
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It could always be a Rose-type exit: we think she's gone forever but she comes back temporarily in a couple of seasons. That's what I'm counting on.
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*Martha
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blink may be my favorite episode;prob is for many...yes the doctor's behavior was strange (differant)in this episode. the strength belonged to river,which it always does,but it felt more so tontie. his emotions were to to say the least pushing him to places i don't recall him going to b/4...remeber the strength in the scene when rose had to leave him(tennant)...great ep,always hard to see people go. the brits do this far more than us americans...good to see the power of love played out,it is often not the case on tv ort elsewhere...
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I think that the plotline og "The silence is coming" is having to do with the statement in this episode, that the doctor is removng himself from history and overall keeping a low profile.

I think it will somehow hurt / affect him when no one no longer kwons of him (the silence).
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no mate,the silence were the race of aliens that were kicked out of earth on the moon landin' :D,they were a race not an event
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I'd love to see River meeting her Grandfather, explaining what happened, then taking him back to be with his son and Amy in the past.



"This is the new 'no spoilers.'" Too bad TV.com failed at not spoiling! On the FRONT page with the link to this review: "Miss U Already, Ponds!" But I learned my lesson a while back - to completely avoid TV.com until after I've watched my shows. I turn off shows after they're done, to avoid previews too. They used to be just teasers, but have turned into spoilers these last few years or so.
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I'm surprised that the 'Miss you already Ponds' spoiled it for you as even before this current series started everyone had been saying that the Ponds would leave in this episode. In addition to which almost every article and some of the reviews for previous episodes in this series have mentioned it too.
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I don't read other sites/forums about shows, only this one. And I try to turn off the show's previews too - I'm not always successful, as I saw Grimm's preview, now someone remembering someone won't be a nice surprise for me.



I used to come to this site to read after I'd watched a few shows, but the occasional story-icon or snippet on this site's front page gives away too much for people trying to avoid spoilers. Put possible spoilers in the actual review, and off the front page please.
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As with all things timey we were first introduced to the Fairy Tale of the Pond Family when it ended with the death of Melody Pond with Dr. Ten. Little did we know then of the roller coaster ride our emotions would be taken on in the following years and incarnation of the eleventh Doctor. And what a lovely piece of writing it has been on everyone's part. "Melody, take care of him...." And in the end that is exactly what she did. Taught the true meaning of love and marriage by her mother when she went off the top of that building with her father in sacrifice, then to have to watch her mother give up her current life in time to be with her father when the Weeping Angels, who were there when Melody Pond first met her mother so long ago, finally and without any hope of changing the outcome, took her father, and in the end Melody kept her word and she gave up her life to save her own husband, and the Fairy tale of the Ponds comes to it's end. The burden and sadness that the Doctor must be burdened with throughout his long long life was never so thoroughly highlighted as with the leaving of Rose, and now the leaving of the Ponds. Knowing that every one he brings into his TARDIS as a companion in the end is going to leave him... "I suppose in the end they all break my heart" is truly the most horrible curse of the Time Lord and Ageless God. Yet he must live on, taking on new travelers and companions into the TARDIS, knowing the outcome of his time with them before they speak a word.



The pleading heartbroken look on the Doctor's face when he begs Amelia to return to the TARDIS so they could try to work something out was the saddest part of the end of the tale. How many times in his long life has the doctor had to live through what amounts to the death of people he learns to love. How guarded must his emotions be kept throughout all his adventures with this truth at the bottom of everything. This episode takes the knowledge of the depth of the Doctor's heartbreak over 900 years to a new level. This is the episode when we begin to see in the glaring light the levels of his complex psyche. He cannot be alone, but he also knows that taking every companion will lead to this. Truly an episode that will go down as one of the best of this incarnation. It began in a garden, it ended in a garden. And oh what a ride from one point to another.



On reflection of the departure of the Doctor's companions I find it comforting to be given the gift through the writing of so many writers that none of the compaions truly dies in front of us. Whether by his choice, their choice, or fate, they have all been given a life after the doctor. They are just taken away from him. They go on to live post-Doctor lives, while he also must go on to live a post-companion life. So the fairy tale is not really of the companions, in the end it is the fairy tale of the Ageless God and Lord of Time. And I wouldn't have missed knowing about it for the world. "The song will end, but the story will never end".

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So what about Brian, eh? If Rory and Amy lived the last of their lives together between the 30's and the present, where does Rory's dad fit in? From his perspective, did they disappear in 2012 and never return?

Where did survivor angle zap Rory and Amy too that they lived and died together? Presumably the one angel did no undo the paradox and cage them in the Quay. Did it give the a one way trip to earlier Manhattan (since that is where their grave is) and just feed on that event?

As sick as I had become of Amy, I am surprisingly not glad they are gone. It was cute that she became a Williams in the end. Rory had really turned into a cool character, but there is no Rory without Amy. River was far less obnoxious this ep, also. But somehow, it all feels very anticlimactic for some reason.
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I still find Donna's departure more emotional. The Doctor took the memories of himself from her, basically making all the journeys they did together obsolete. I really didn't like that, because she was a breath of fresh air from 2 previous companions who wanted The Doctor to want them, Donna on the other hand was more of a sister (basically was, what with the whole Doctor Donna metacrisis.)



I am really sad to see Amy and Rory leave. Amy IMO is the best companion of the series (9th Doctor+) I will miss her sexy Scottish accent. The Doctor was a bit selfish to not want Amy to go back, yes I know it was probably because it was possible that she wouldn't have even went back to the same time that Rory went back to. I thought River was going to show some emotion for her parents leaving for good, but maybe she could go back to see them time and time again.



I still don't understand why the Doctor couldn't still go back just to visit them. I mean the paradox would only happen if he took them out of their fixed time stream.



I still wished they could of had a second child and raise that one up properly, the whole Melody aging with them was kind of a let down because they weren't actually parents, but rather peers.



I think "Yowzah" was a perfect word for the way River/Kingston was dressed. She looked stunning.
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All I have to say is I LOVED this episode. I think it was a great way for the Ponds to go out and all the emotions going on with the Doctor and River and everyone...man am I excited for the Christmas episode :O I feel like I got to watch it again to get all the little references and get a better understanding on it as a whole though - there was just so much awesomeness going on.
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SPOILERS!!!!!



I have a lot of mixed feelings and unanswered questions. Clearly Amy and Rory have grown closer over the years so that touched me deeply.



But I have problems with it as well. The Statue of Liberty isn't stone. I thought the Angels turned to stone.



Now the Doctor can magically heal people with regeneration energy? If he can do that why did he not save the oldest, wisest being in the universe, the Face of Boe, or any other number of people who deserved saving? Felt forced and just pulled out of thin air.



The ending was anticlimactic. When Rose left, when Donna left, when Martha left, there was a kind of punch in the gut. This lacked that somehow and for me it robbed their leaving of the emotional impact it could have had.



I felt really bad for the Doctor, and for River, too, but I dunno, River's reaction sort of bothered me. Not sure why. It just seems like Amy and Rory's fate bothered him more than it did River.



Also, they kept saying they were married. Since the Doctor never told her his name at the wedding they aren't married, I thought. "There's only one time I would tell you my name. Only one time I *could*" So if it's not at their wedding then when *would* he tell her his name?



The Big Red Button (the paradox) that people gripe about with RTD...a lot of people will swallow it whole because it's Moff.



River acting a bit unemotional had an oddness to it, like she knows something she can't tell the Doctor. I felt like I was more sorrowful than she was. Clearly the Doctor was. And what's really sad is the Doctor promised Rory's dad he wouldn't let them die. And who is going to tell Brian the Doctor failed and that they did die?



I've begun to wonder if River hasn't found out what happened in the Library and maybe that time is coming.



We know the Doctor took little Amy from outside on her suitcase and put her to bed. If he told her her everything she was going to do then that's a big honking plot hole because she said she waited for days, so did he go back that morning and tell her or did he put her to bed?



I don't think he went back to that morning and told Amy all those things. Amy clearly had no clue what was going to happen. Also if he did go back after sunrise and put her to bed then she *didn't* wait for him for days. Can't have it both ways.



. QUESTION: If that apartment block never existed.... where did the Ponds go back to?



I enjoyed it, but I can't give it more than an 8 out of 10 and maybe less.
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Let me at least try to answer these - if anything it might give a bit more perspective



1) at least basing things only on Blink, the Angels weren't actually made of stone - they were living beings that took on the appearance of stone statues, because those were the statues that were the most common. While I agree making the Statue of Liberty into an "angel" is a bit on the cheesy side, I can only assume that Moffat caught Ghostbusters II while brainstorming :P



2) As River pretty much pointed out - The Doctor doing that was no trivial act. He was essentially shortening his own lifespan by doing so - made even more serious by the fact that he's (barring some retcon) pretty close to being out of regenerations. That's why River was so mad at him for doing something so reckless just to save her from her pain. Also the fact that River has been altered by the time spent on the TARDIS, she's not exactly just human. As far as why he didn't use his regeneration power to heal others? That just shows how special River is to him.



3) First off, I see where you're coming from with this one - most, if not all of those companions had their end happen in in the same 1-2 part episode that started out with just another day. In the case of Rory and Amy on the other hand, we pretty much already knew that The Doctor was going to be getting a new companion this season, and the hints that they were coming to an end can be traced back to last season. But this time it wasn't so much a "gut punch" as it was a cruel trick. Everything was set up to play out like any other companion exit - an adventure ending in too close of a call, that leads to The Doctor and his companion(s) going their separate ways. And just when everybody thought it was going to come to a sweet ending...that angel showed up. and Moffat pulled the rug out from under us.



4) You have to keep in mind, that River is pretty much used to seeing things out of order - and while she certainly loves her parents, she's always been quite the independent type. The Doctor on the other hand pretty much needs his companions as much if not more than they need him. Combine that with his fascination with humans - despite their short life span, and the fact that he's been dealing with this for what? 200-300 of his 900+ year old life? And you can start to understand why he never likes the ending. The other thing to keep in mind is that The Doctor is nowhere near a perfect individual - he has the habit of getting extremely selfish - which also played a part in his reaction to Amy wanting to join Rory. River didn't, because she knew that Amy was making the right choice,



5) Its tough to read too much into River and the Doctor's story - especially considering that they're traveling in opposite directions - chances are they will make it a point however, to show that event when it actually happens.



A lot of the sciency wiency stuff is more glossed over with Moffat at the helm - although he's doing the lore justice, he's also a really good story teller which really doesn't depend on the technical stuff as much.



6) Again, out of everybody involved - The Doctor had the most to lose out of Amy's choice - River knew that Amy was making the right decision, and she knew that most of the Doctor's reaction was out of his own selfishness.



7) Although it seems like the last two Doctor/River encounters actually did take place sequentially, remember, River is going in the opposite direction - so for her, the death of the doctor takes place quite a while before the events in the library



8) Basically - Timey Wimey stuff. She never actually said - nor did they show that little Amelia actually sat out on that suitcase for days - she may indeed have waited for The Doctor, but beyond that first night, it happened inside. Also - after such brief appearances, it's unlikely that they'd be quite as memorable as that night.



Again - as they say, time has this tendency to set itself right.. If the event that triggered the paradox never happened, which was why the angel took Rory, then the end result was the same as if the paradox never happened.
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If the doctor is no longer in the universe data base and River is not in prison THEN why would she still go to the library ( her end ) I thought she went there to get a pardon this time for sure... soooo is that how she ends too now or is that different..??
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Didn't she go as an archeologist? The pardon thing was the Weeping Angels two parter, if I remember correctly.
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