Elementary "The Leviathan" Review: Hooray for Career Day!

Elementary S02E10: "The Leviathan"

I wish I could be a blogging curmudgeon all the time and have something to complain about in every review, but alas, every so often I'm genuinely entertained by an episode and get so caught up in the actual show I forget to pick out things to complain about. Last night's Elementary is a prime example. At first I was very angry about the whole threesome with twins thing (I have twin sisters so I'm particularly sensitive to Twin Issues), because it's one of those TV tropes that won't die despite the fact that it's out-and-out incest and only possible if you're dealing with two completely broken people, but now I've gotten that rant out of my system I have nothing but praise for "The Leviathan."

Quite literally a puzzle, Sherlock was given a brainy little task in solving how an expensive vault was broken into for a second time and for once the first people we met (floor manager, creator of the Leviathan) were not ultimately the culprits. No, after Sherlock's usual antics of disregarding private property:


And stumbling onto inappropriately grisly crime scenes:

...he pieced together that three jurors at the trial of the first band of thieves who cracked the Leviathan figured out their M.O. and then conducted a copycat heist. Pretty cool concept, really, and the process of figuring out the algorithm and swabbing down the suspects was full of really genuinely interesting bits of information. And the final twist, that blood found at a crime scene matched another profile because it was generated by donated bone marrow, like that was seriously interesting and unique. Add to that the joy of Watson being very involved and not in left field! Yes, despite taking off for girlie stuff ("Brunch with mom!") after disapprovingly checking out Sherlock's twin bedfellows, Watson and her doctor steeze was instrumental in solving this week's case. 'Bout time, I say.

Not that Watson didn't also have her own emotionally wrought B arc this week. Watson's mom has a bad case of the order-for-yas, seemed mildly disapproving (although I would have been giving that vest dress the side eye too), and was sort of obsessed with her son (or at least that's what we were led to believe). Sherlock saved the day by inviting himself to dinner with Watson's family and warmly describing her career in florid terms. "Her success can be measured in careers restored... and lives saved."

And dishes washed. I'm sorry, but WHY was Watson already washing the dishes when Sherlock came in with wine? She better have used two bowls while eating her own dinner because a sober companion shouldn't be a live-in maid. Although he did bring her breakfast in bed so maybe she was just returning the favor.

Weirdly, when Watson's mom came to visit Holmes' place, she was supposed to be sort of aghast at the gorgeously lit, fastidiously decorated brownstone where Watson is currently slummin'. Like please. "I've never seen anything like it," disapproving mom managed disapprovingly. Well, I guess you never watched Season 3 of The Real World. The house, the lacy sheets, the eclectic Victorian-cum-'90s coffee shop vibe is part of the show (and Holmes and Watson's "shared love of the bizarre," if "bizarre" means carefully curated antiques, Eames chairs, flatscreen TVs, and a heapin' helpin' of shabby chic). The cozy atmosphere is 40 percent of the appeal, the other 60 percent is the idea of a job where you set your own hours, sleep in in the morning until it's light out, and get to physically walk outside on the reg. Maybe we should ALL go be sober companions.

Of course Watson's mom visiting wasn't important in that she had come to terms with her daughter's career—it was that finally a voice broke through the sober talk blather and said "Hey Watson, you like deducing. How about you focus on that?" Will this mean Watson is less likely to take to her heels next week and spend the episode at the side of yet another troubled ex-boyfriend? I certainly hope so. I'd love it if the series would click Watson into full-on deductive mode, and this episode (written in part by the show's creator) seemed to be pointing the boat in that direction.

Tink tink tink fork on crystal, attention, all you Greglock shippers, Gregson and Sherlock had some really adorable moments this week. You could tell Gregson was going weak in the knees when Sherlock dropped a load of stolen swag onto his desk...

...and then when he walked into a crime scene and Sherlock was soulfully playing piano? That will haunt Gregson's dreams for years to come. Aidan Quinn's perpetually misty eyes and the fact that he's wildly overqualified to play a bit regular like Gregson leads me to believe the actor has created his own motivation for this police chief, and he's portraying the character as a man desperately struggling to contain an all-consuming love. I'm sorry, I need some romance to watch a show and Quinn gots whats it takes. Its my version of a twin threesome fantasy, okay?

Final question, and it's a career one and it's leveled at Sherlock: Is the NYPD paying him? I could have sworn he said in the pilot that he volunteers his services. Yet he's offering jobs to a locksmith on a consultant basis and keeps describing himself as a consultant. Is Daddums going to fund not only Sherlock's funny T-Shirt collection but another member of his entourage? Is Daddums going to bankroll Watson as a deductive partner? Inquiring minds want to know.


QUESTIONS:

1. Is Sherlock getting paid for his many many services?

2. Twin threesome: Early '80s beer commercial relic or every man's fantasy?

3. Did you love this week's mystery?

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I just got into this show and have been going back like crazy and downloading/binge watching episodes to catch up, and despite some occasionally cheesy dialogue, I love it! Dr. Joan Watson is the best role Lucy Liu has played since O-Ren Ishii in the Kill Bill films...and finally, there's a Sherlock that has a compelling Watson character, instead of just a silly sideshow. In fact, I'd say Liu's Watson is much more compelling than the Sherlock character (though this is not at all Johnny Lee Miller's fault, just speaks to the strength of Watson). This epsiode really did a great job of providing even better characterization for Watson, and that alone made it interesting.

Anyway, regarding this episode's mystery specifically, I really like how it was a bit of a change up to focus on a robbery instead of a murder, and I really got caught up in the mystery of how the lock was breached. Oh and to top it all off, I loved that they used "Medicate or Stimulate" by Minutes Til Midnight during the vault robbery scene - I always hear their other song "Unstoppable" being used in shows but never "Medicate or Stimulate" and that is my favorite song of theirs so that was a cool surprise.
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If i recall the books correctly, I believe he volunteered his services to the police/detectives for free, but usually charged consulting fees for the randoms that showed up at his door looking for his help
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I predict, Watson will leave Holmes but will really hate working for her new client and talk with Holmes (or probably be called by him at 2 in the morning) and be a little help but over a few episodes will work her way back to full time detective partner.

NYPD does not pay Holmes, inmates don't need much money but I got the impression the problem solving and chance to show Holmes his own brilliance was the payment.
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I felt this episode clicked together very nicely...
" ... he's portraying the character as a man desperately struggling to contain an all-consuming love"
ROFL ROFL ROFL! He does come across as a protective older brother mind... but if you want to see romance there... who am I to burst the bubble! ;-)
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In the first minute of last week's episode, Watson flat out stated that the NYPD does not pay Holmes for his services. He's charged private clients before though, so that's one source of income.

He's also probably selling homemade honey.
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Elementary
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Shoutout to Casterly Rock Security. Had me going there.
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-Maybe he's technically getting paid but the money is really going elsewhere. I don't know. If I'm not mistaken when one is a consultant like that theyre supposed to be paid regardless. I could be wrong though. Not like he'd be getting paid much. I
-Both, I think. I admittedly chuckled when that happen. I would have rocked that annoyed yet stoic face Watson had. But if it was merely to assuage those still crying that they don't want any sexual tension whatsoever between watson and sherlock than so be it. They at least did it in a way that doesn't stop their relationship from progressing. Because I like where they are now. Reluctant friends. It's there. It was a milestone the last episode in how he stayed with her or how she tended to him when he was sick, and in the subtle things in this one. The crashing dinner and making her look good in front of her folks but then teasingly taking it back in the car. The breakfast in bed to her chagrin. They're cutesy roomates who are becoming reluctant friends in a strictly platonic way and I love that. It's what I wanted to see. Them getting close w/o people fearing that it would mean something different. Lee and Liu have great chemistry and I'm glad that they're working with that more.
- I did. I loved the reminder that they don't have to just focus on murder investigations and what not. Plus Watson was offering things. We so desperately needed that. I wanted them to seem more like partners and for her to actually have valuable knowledge to offer. I wanted her to deduce along with him and match him in being competent. So I'm grateful for that. Strong episode. I liked it.
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I really liked this ep, but I know I have seen the "DNA is different because of bone marrow transplant" bit at least twice before, once in some CSI I believe. Certainly enough to feel like it was a little bit of a cheat here just to throw a 5 minute red herring at us.
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I am not sure, but I think I have seen it in a House episode as well, plus maybe one Mentalist episode too (I mean the double DNA thing)
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About time this show started getting more love here! The show has been consistent in bringing quirky well written and acted episodes. And about the twin issue, dream on guyz always dream abt that!
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I'm pretty sure he is getting paid if he is asked to consult by a private company. But by the police? I'm not sure about that.

I really liked the case this week. It wasn't as far-fetched as last week. What bothered me though is that Sherlock never really figured out how to break the safe. He just figured out who broke it and how they broke it. Its always a magic algorithm. Granted, Sherlock isn't a math genius or cryptographer.

I love how the writers put so much on character development. We don't get to see this kind of development in other procedurals in a first season. Although enough with Watson. I want to know more about Sherlock!
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Best episode so far, still doesn't work completely the way it should in my opinion though.
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Part of me feels like those sisters didn't exactly have a threesome with Sherlock, but maybe just took turns? Meh. To answer your question though, I have thought -- and I guess "fantasized" -- about MFF threesomes of which I'm the M. Sisters and/or twins, though, isn't really for me. The thought of participating in someone's incest would probably pop up in my head every few seconds and I'd likely feel too dirty about it to enjoy it. Then again, with that said, if two beautiful sisters and/or twins came up to me and offered, I'd probably give in. *Shrugs* What's a pervert to do?

Anyway, you really shouldn't ask about sex and fantasies... it's taken me off track from thinking and talking about the actual episode, hehe ;) I liked the episode. I typically watch for the detective portion of it, but I quite enjoyed the Watson story as well. Ever since Watson talked about leaving, I obviously assumed that there would have to be something to keep her with Holmes. I thought this was a rather good way of going about it. The case of the week was pretty interesting too.
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Agree with your take as I commented before. I too think Sherlock took turns.
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The threesome was completely irrelevant. If it wasn't left in for pure shock value, it best have a better reason for sticking around than making Watson jealous. This week's episode was enjoyable enough, though the mother coming in to push Joan toward being Sherlock's deductive companion instead of his sober companion was heavy-handed. Your plot is showing up your story, Elementary.
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This may have been the best episode of Elementary to date. Funny how a halfway decent mystery/case will do that.

I also liked this episode because it finally officially recognized Sherlock's work is a turn on for Ms. Watson. I'm fairly sure BBC's Sherlock established in the first episode how Watson was a danger junkie who never felt more alive than when in the thick of things. The relationship between the two rapidly advanced as well (kindred spirits and all that).

I'm eagerly anticipating the day when Watson removes the "sober" from her sober companion job description, and is with Sherlock because she wants to be, not because she's being paid by his father. Her discussion with Sherlock in the cab after the dinner with her family at long last showed why these two will become soulmates in sleuthing.

After watching almost half a season of Elementary, I can honestly say it's not nearly as bad as I thought it would be. As far as procedurals go, it has the possibility of being one of the better ones on TV. And with the tantalizing prospect of Irene Adler and Professor James Moriarty still on the horizon (I hope they slow play the Moriarty reveal), there is room for improvement.

BUT

I don't know if I will ever see JLM as Sherlock Holmes. I don't even know if I'm supposed to. First of all, the show is set in New York not London (is there a Baker Street in New York?). The writers of Elementary have imbued greater significance to Sherlock's addictive proclivities, whereas in the books his addiction to cocaine was not entirely disregarded, but definitely was denigrated as his "only vice". Also, considering the fact they've turned the Holmes/Watson relationship on its head by making Watson a woman, and have apparently exchanged Sherlock's brother, Mycroft, for an as yet to be seen father, this fiction seems to be more and more tenuously based on the immortal works of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

That's not to say Elementary isn't good in its own right. It's simply different.

Questions:

1. Not by the NYPD, but almost certainly by his other clients.
2. All my fantasies involve one woman. Call me old fashioned.
3. No. They can do better. But I did like it.

MY FINAL QUESTION:

Sherlock and Watson hooking up: Never gonna happen or inevitable?
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Sherlock did get paid for checking on the banker deaths in 'The Rat Race' episode, so it is not as if there was no precedence for that. As for the twins, I suppose I am enough of a scientist to be willing to test that theory. Or enough of a guy. And this episode did seem better than previous ones. No idea why.
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I liked this week's episode. That said, the overall problem I'm having with the show at this point is that the word "deduction" is getting thrown around incorrectly, much like Alanis Morrissette's rampant misuse of the title word in her hit song "Ironic" years ago (everything she talked about just sucked, they weren't ironic). Most of what I see on Elementary is Holmes figuring things out because of a massive internal storehouse of knowledge. He knows all these insane things about chemicals, security systems, construction, bombs, you name it. That's a great gift, and something a character like Sherlock Holmes ought to possess, but there's not a ton of actual deduction going on. As in, making logical leaps from point A to point B to point C as only Sherlock could, USING his massive amount of knowledge. In Elementary, he mainly gathers facts and then figures things out as anyone with a lot of knowledge on the subject would. Not much to separate him from various other experts a big city police department ought to have on hand. In other incarnation, "Sherlock" for example, the audience is treated to a lot more legitimate deduction--looking at a few barely noticeable things to extrapolate an entire string of events and a correct backstory behind them. I feel like the writers are doing okay with plots and doing a decent job with arcs so far, but could be doing much better with the intricate details that are supposed to make Sherlock Holmes, well.....Sherlock Holmes.
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I always considered it ironic that a song called "Ironic"... isn't
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There are literally no lyrics in Alanis's song that could be deemed ironic. "It's like ten thousand spoons when all you need is a knife." Not only is that not ironic, I don't even know what the hell it's supposed to mean. Is it some sort of penis metaphor? Regardless, she shames all Canadians with her substandard knowledge of the English language.

As for the deduction debate, you're right, Elementary has fallen into the trap of creating their mysteries/cases like any other American procedural. They present the information on the case and allow the laymen to be able to follow along and draw their own conclusions. I'm running 10/10 right now (by that I mean I figured out the mystery before Sherlock explained it to us). I shouldn't be able to do that. This is the great Sherlock Holmes we're talking about. The mysteries shouldn't remind me of CSI. When BBC's "Sherlock" solved a mystery, I felt like standing up and clapping at his deductive prowess. Why? Because he usually lost me by point B. I WANT to feel like an intellectual ant when Sherlock cracks the case. Sadly, Elementary hasn't added to my inferiority complex yet.

Although, there was one deduction Sherlock made in this episode that is worthy of his name. He deduced that a second party couldn't have broken into the Leviathan on their own if he was unable to do so. A leap in hubristic logic that turned out to be true.
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That was the one part of the episode I didn't quite understand. He was convinced the second crime had help because he (Sherlock) couldn't figure it out himself. That doesn't answer how the first mastermind was able to pull off the crime. The assumption seemed to be that if Sherlock couldn't do it, nobody can. Obviously that was incorrect, since the first guy did it.

You nailed the other point. The show feels more like a CSI or Law and Order than a crazy-genius Sherlock Holmes. In the BBC's Sherlock, I usually have to rewind his speech's a time or two when he really gets going because the constantly string of deductions come at me too fast to process. I know what you mean about the show adding to your inferiority complex (or not).
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What I mean is, there's a difference between "brilliant deduction" and "I know a lot of stuff."
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deducing <-- haha good one
I was confused about the "consultants" he uses. How did he expect to get the lock pick out of jail, or was he going to bring locks into the prison and ask him how to crack them?. Actually it really doesn't matter I'll still watch the show.
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I imagine it was going to be Sherlock visiting the criminal in jail to ask for his experience / expertise.

If the guy truly is a world-class lock pick and such, then you wouldn't need to bring in the lock. You could say "Kensington 520" or something. And they could just talk about it, as Sherlock is also a lock picker and would know what the guy means.
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This was the first episode that felt like a Sherlock Holmes mystery. As to your question, Sherlock, in this iteration, did say that he consults for free to the NYPD. However, that doesn't mean he exclusively works for them, his occupation would be as a consultant for hire. They haven't really addressed that in the show, but I think it would be naive to think he would just sit and allow himself to be taken care of without ever earning money, even if it show hasn't explicitly told us that yet.
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Did anyone else think they could have given the Champagne away rather than flush it down the sink. I mean we know Watson's family is in town - 500 bucks a pop sheesh!!
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In the scene where Sherlock was playing the piano, we saw that he didn't have gloves on, but when he pointed at the evidence, he was suddenly wearing gloves. Sorry I'm being so nitpicky, I just tend to notice details like this and they bug me a little, but the episode was great, probably one of the best this season.
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I think Sherlock entering Watson's bedroom in the morning was a bit creepy. It was nice to see Joan's family. I guess after her mother's visit Watson will stay with Holmes to become a detective.

1. I think only private customers pay Holmes for counselling.

2. Probably a man's dream. It's a common motive. For a change I would like to see the female version of it - one woman and two brothers. That would be more original.

3. It was ok, but I had a little problem following it.
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I think he picks and chooses when to be paid. So he doesn't get paid by the NYPD, but when a big company wants his services he'll probably demand a massive fee...
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Somehow I had a different take on the twins. Maybe from how Sherlock explained it, or how the twins showed up, how they were dressed, one heading upstairs, the other to a room on the same floor to get dressed. Anyway to me it seemed like they weren't a threesome in bed together, but in different rooms with Sherlock alternating between rooms. Since to Sherlock it was more than a sexual encounter I think that's how this character might study twin differences. Can't do that in the same bed not constantly being aware of which twin is which.
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I also just loved this episode. Everything was clicking in the right direction. Watson on board with the case, a case worthy of Sherlock, the police mostly listening, Watson's mom pointing out that hey, it's okay to like your current job (even IF most people don't). As for the vest outfit, I loved it. I suppose that means that I have no fashion sense.... I'm okay with that.
-Pretty sure that he isn't. But that could be like the honeybees thing...
-I'm with you on this one. I have no real association with twins, but the thought has always creeped me out. No matter how you play it, that's two girls who are sisters in bed with the same man (or vice versa, I suppose (gender equality what!), though it's almost exclusively played the other direction on TV/in movies), and I can tell you, as a man with a brother NO times 10 to the 5 billionth power. Sick, and doing that would involve some VERY scarred twins.
-Loved this week's mystery. In my opinion, there was just 1 tiny thing missed. They kept mentioning a guy who "organized" the crime. Then created the 4 guys in it together thing twice. I have no problem with that. But why can't there still have been a guy behind the scenes just ever so slightly flicking things in the right direction. I speak, of course, of Moriarty. Even if not mentioned by name, this is the perfect crime with which to start an undercurrent of something bigger. Let its mythos build gradually. Don't just bring him up in an episode and have Sherlock "remember" (read: Flashback) to all the "indications that he misdiagnosed". My take.
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I loved this week's episode!! and Lucy lui in short shorts!!! ow!
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I did enjoy this episode overall. As I say, it's pretty much in there with Bones, The Mentalist, and Castle...but with Lucy Liu. Like the rest of them, the procedurals are ridiculous, so they really boil down to the characters. Fortunately, my childhood crush kept me interested long enough to get used to the Sherlock that isn't from Sherlock, and now I like them together for the most part.

Definitely a plus: an Asian parent (hell, 4 Asians in the same show) that didn't have to fake an accent. I'm not sure, but I have a feeling Lucy Liu is to thank for that one. And the mom's pep talk at the end was pretty good, and not too cheesy.

As for the twins, ehh. I've dated a twin, and at least in that case, I wouldn't have touched the sister with a 20-ft. pole. Twins really aren't similar enough, and if both were worth knowing in any capacity at all, they....wouldn't. I don't have a problem with Sherlock being recreational about sex, but having twins just to compare their techniques just doesn't seem like something he'd care about. It just seemed tacky, overall.
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1. I also think not from the police force directly but from everyone else. He was hired in this episode.

2. They've made an effort on the series to have Sherlock doing things a lot of people disapprove of, this is just another thing on this line. Besides, I'd think Sherlock is genuinely interested in the differences on twins. But it was still a bit too sleazy, they could definitely come up with a bit more innovative ways to shock the audience and Watson.

3. The puzzle was good.

I'm also rooting for Watson the Detective. Less mothering, more brain already. And I want some sexual tension on the show, though maybe not from Quinn. If they don't want to pair up the protagonists they could at least give us some tasty supporting characters for this purpose.
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For really no apparent reason I do like this show. Although the plot was hugely far-fetched I enjoyed the chase this time - the bone marrow thing, not so much. The idea of a jury copycatting a crime was new - I think, at least I've never seen it - and as unlikely as it was in this case, it was fun. "Sherlock" taking an ax to the safe was absurd though. And I didn't like the twins threesome much. I put quotes around Sherlock because I do not see him as Sherlock Holmes at all and Watson's a g-g-girl for crimes sake. And I didn't really get why the master thief's son let them just walk away with the swag like that. "Sherlock" doesn't even have a badge. "Sure, just take it, I don't care."
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Why the son let him walk? To make sure his fathers thieving past was kept secret.
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Anyone else notice the game of thrones reference?
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I was starting to think that I had been the only one. It has become so popular that almost every show has had a shout-out at one point or another. I particularly liked this one. Casterly Rock as the name of the company that produced The Leviathan. LOL.
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Loved it this week.
Was this the fall finale or is there another episode next week?
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1. Since he is a consultant with the police I think he has to be paid. I mean, if Shawn and Gus from Psych get paid, then it would literally be a crime for Sherlock not to be.

2. As a guy, I think that the more important word in "twin threesome" is the threesome bit. The threesome fantasy is much more applicable to the male population. Personally, I would imagine that a threesome with two twins aren't all they're cracked up to be, as you could easily create the same experience by getting dizzy before having sex with one woman.

3. I enjoyed this episode quite a bit as well. There one thing I'm worried about is that this is the second time the killer wasn't smart so much as lucky. This week, the two criminal masterminds who were responsible for the two heists both died before Sherlock was able to even talk to them. The actual murderer ended up being the engineer in second team, who had little to do with the actual smarts of the robbery. The one thing he had going for him is that had had a disease which had been cured through a bone marrow transplant. Because of this he knew that any DNA samples from his blood wouldn't match those from the rest of his body. This is not brilliance, this is a convenient byproduct. Now, I do enjoy these cases where Sherlock is faced with a rather complex and intricate series of problems, because there are many chances for him to show off his stuff and it's more likely that at least one of these puzzles will resonate with me as a viewer, and often many of them do. However, these cases also trouble me because it's not so much that any one of these puzzles are difficult, it's just that there are more of them. In earlier episodes, Sherlock had to solve very difficult problems and took more time doing so, and usually these problems were difficult because of brilliant adversaries. But lately, his adversaries have been less brilliant, and it is rather the situation of the cases that are puzzling (usually do to something unusual happening due to chance). This issue could easily be rectified if Sherlock had more of a long term villain that he could go head to dead with. So basically Moriarty needs to show up and call Sherlock out (the best decision is for Moriarty to be Sherlock's actor friend).

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In re: your #2, "The threesome fantasy is much more applicable to the male population.", I would counter that particular statement is a generalization. A number of the major publishing houses that market to female romance readers have subsidiary lines focused on menage literature, and a basic search of Amazon eBooks shows more than 5.2% of their stock of romance novels is menage content marketed mainly to women. I think it is safe to say that plenty of women share this fantasy. But the sibling bit is gross.
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Actually I wasn't saying that women don't have threesome fantasies. I was saying that, for men, a threesome fantasy is far more applicable than a twin threesome fantasy. The statement itself is boringly obvious since, like a square and rectangle situation, the definition of threesome can include a twin threesome, so obviously if people are into twin threesomes they will by definition be into threesomes. However, what I was really saying is that it is the fact that one guy is having sex with two women that is the real turn on, and that (in my opinion) men find the threesome part important, not the twin bit important. One thing that I didn't add is that often the appeal of a threesome is that you can have sex with two people that don't look alike, for example both a blonde and a brunet. But since I've never had a threesome myself, I'm going from my gut here.

So yeah, I wasn't actually saying that men are more likely to have a threesome fantasy than women. In fact, I completely agree with what you said (it's pretty difficult to disagree since you used hard facts). I do wonder though, since a twin threesome fantasy for guys is fairly prevalent in popular culture, is the same true for women? I honestly can't say because 1. I'm a guy and 2. I haven't asked any of the women I know whether or not this is the case. If I were to guess, I would say not so much, as I can't think of a single example of this appearing in any fiction I've every consumed, even a brief scene like in this episode. At least, I can't remember it happening, which obviously isn't to say that I haven't missed it or forgotten it. But since I've spent the time it's taken me to type this, wondering whether or not the twin fantasy is a thing for women, I'd actually like to know. Is it?
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Thanks for clarifying your statement. The subject matter of most of the literature suggests that like men, women predominately fantasize about 2 opposite sex partners, so perhaps the same principles apply with twins. My guess on the prevalence of the twin threesome in pop culture is that it tongue-in-cheek ups the ante on a topic that is already wink-and-nod risque. Honestly I was pretty shocked to see even the suggestion of it on CBS considering their typical programming, though FX did it like three times on Nip/Tuck alone. I also wonder why these sexually adventurous fictitious gals are almost always blond. Are brunette and ginger female twins all around less likely to share a male partner than their wilder, more adventurous blond contemporaries?

To your question, I would think the appeal of a threesome, more than being with two people who don't look alike, is being with two different people at once who likely have different personalities, different styles and methods of connecting with a partner, and the simultaneous contrast is both novel and exciting. Or if two of the people are in a relationship, then there is also a sort of cuckold voyeur/exhibitionist thrill to be with an outsider together. I consider myself pretty laissez faire about people and relationships though I find the blood bond taboo pretty uncrossable. I honestly cannot say if a twin fantasy is prevalent among women (I'm in the quasi-incest opinion group and I've never heard any woman discuss it, but I'm more a tomboy so perhaps I wasn't invited to that slumber party?), I can only say definitively that the twin thing - not a thing for this woman.
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Good answer. Much appreciated.
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Another thing I'm having trouble with is that thing you said about romance. I'm conflicted. At one point, I'm *really* hoping they don't go with the Sherlock/Watson romance, 'cause it'd just screw up things and I'm really starved for the male/female friendship that happens all the time in real life but almost never on TV. But then again, could Sherlock have any other meaningful romantic interest in this series? Unless they bring Irine Adler in big time, I think not. And people need good romance. I need good romance. :P
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First onto your questions:
1) Apparently not by the NYPD, but from private jobs? Apparently so.
2) Ugh. Both, I guess.
3) Surprisinlgy, I didn't. I don't like convenient coincidences and the fact that on one jury there *just* happened to be *four* people, who *just* happened to have the needed skill sets? And then, the black only black guy in the bunch gets to be the perp? Come on! And the bone marrow thing is really starting to get old...
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