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Exploring Revolution's Homoerotic Subtext: Why Miles and Monroe's Relationship Is More Interesting Than the Blackout

Early in its life, Revolution was a drama about society's efforts to survive 15 years after a worldwide blackout. Its themes were simple: family, family, and family. But as family members started dying off, swords were ditched for guns, and the power flickered back on, the show's themes changed. By the end of this week's Season 1 finale, "The Dark Tower," new themes had overtaken the series: gun control, technology's place in war, the dissemination of information, and man's greatest question... should I take the elevator or the stairs? However, one theme that's been hanging around just below the surface all season long went from a simmer to a boil in Monday's episode: unrequited love. But not between Nora and Miles. Not between Rachel and Miles. I'm talking about Sebastian Monroe and Miles Matheson. And while the rest of "The Dark Tower" made very little sense and was very forgettable, the burgeoning relationship between Miles and Monroe was so clear that I can't stop thinking about it.

The finale picked up right where the previous episode had left off, with Monroe going after Miles with the intent to kill him. But things took a turn when a common enemy showed up, forcing/allowing Miles and Monroe—former mortal enemies, as we were led to believe—to join forces and save each other's asses. Anyone who's watched a few episodes of Revolution knows the characters have a nasty habit of switching allegiances for no apparent reason, but this was sudden even by the show's standards, and it certainly elicited a very surprised "WHAT!?" from me. I just couldn't figure out why these two were working together mere moments after they'd been so eager to kill each other. But a few scenes later, the impetus for the change of heart was obvious: Sebastian Monroe is clearly obsessed with Miles Matheson, and it's confusing the hell out of him. And it's not just me who thinks so; even Tom Neville (Giancarlo Esposito) picked up on it, as later in the episode he said (to Monroe), and I'm not making this up, "You have a borderline erotic fixation on Miles Matheson." 


Over the course of the series, there's always been something going on with these two. They've been best friends, they've shared women, they've wrestled. But in "The Dark Tower," the brotherly love—which had already become a little steamier than that of a normal friendship—evolved into a possible homoerotic wonderland. Once their common threat was vanquished, they somehow rode the Tower's sewer line/waterslide out to a beach, where Miles lay there unconscious and awoke to Monroe watching him sleep. And then as soon as Miles opened his eyes, the pair started pounding on each other like hormonal preteens—but never to the point of real life-threatening danger. Just enough to work up a sweat and and tussle Monroe's hair.

When they weren't grabbing at each other and punching each other in the face, they were firing off lines of dialogue as if they were working out some relationship issues. Monroe to Miles, embodying the spurned lover: "Everything I have ever done was for you. You care so much about the Republic, I don't care. The only thing I ever cared about was watching your back. That's the only reason I followed you into any of this." This is a man who took control of an army to start his conquest of America, but now claims that he doesn't care about world domination, he only cares about Miles Matheson. That seems like an awful lot of effort to make an impression. Obsessed isn't a strong-enough word for Monroe's feelings toward Miles. Watch how badly he yearns for the old days (and notice how the conversations they have are frequently interrupted by gunfire, helicopters, or other immediate threats that don't allow for closure):

And here's Miles to Monroe, telling Monroe why he couldn't kill him before, but he may as well have been explaining why he can't be Monroe's lover: "Ask me why I couldn't. We're still brothers, and as much as I hate that, let me tell you, I do, that's never going to change." Miles is in denial about the nature of their friendship, but he's also guilty of leading Monroe on at times, like when he gave Monroe a flirty nod to say, "Come on over, I won't hurt you" when they teamed up at the beginning of the finale.

After "The Dark Tower," I went back and re-watched Miles and Monroe's excellent bro-down n the midseason finale, "Nobody's Fault But Mine," to check for consistency... and it was more of the same. Monroe was pleading, practically on his knees, for Miles to come back to him. He went on about how they're better together than apart. And about how Rachel, Miles' one-time lover and sister-in-law, isn't Miles' family, Monroe is. Coincidentally or not, it's in these moments that David Lyons really delivers his best performances. Also coincidentally or not, this is when Revolution is at its best.

This is what I wrote back then about Miles and Monroe's scene in "Nobody's Fault But Mine," and it still stands:

Monroe pleading with Miles to come back smacked of Eric Kripke's accidentally homoerotic fan-fic fodder Supernatural has been so successful with. I mean, for a second, I really thought the two were about to embrace and shove their tongues down each other's throats during that final confrontation. But if we're at least picking that up on our gaydar, it means there's genuine characterization and emotion at play, two basic elements of writing that have been entirely absent from the series so far.


Don't get me wrong, I'm not laughing at any of this. Well, maybe a little. But there's no doubt that Miles and Monroe have, by far, the most compelling and clearly defined relationship in the series. For a show that keeps trying to convince us that Rachel and Miles have a spark, that Miles and Nora are former lovers, and that Jason and Charlie are in love (all three of those relationships are as romantic as a slaughterhouse), it's Miles and Monroe's relationship that feels the most believable, whether it's platonic or otherwise. 

And again, there's nothing wrong with this. Absolutely nothing, and I'm being serious. I feel like I have to repeat that because I know everyone thinks I just make fun of this show, but I'm really truly serious! I don't know how intentional the homoerotic subtext is, but it's all over the place. Even no-nonsense Neville agreed with me, for cryin' out loud. You have a borderline erotic fixation on Miles Matheson. So obviously Revolution's writers are aware of it, right? 

So that's why I'm begging the writers to go with this. Hell, go as far as giving Miles and Monroe a former fling, or just continue to insinuate that Monroe's fixation on Miles extends to some dark place beyond them just being buddies. I don't know if a story like this has ever played out on television before, certainly not on a network sci-fi show, but go for it. Blaze some trails, bring network science-fiction into the 21st century. Men at war have secrets, it happens. Miles and Monroe's off-and-on relationship is the strongest part of Revolution and it needs more focus than just two confrontations a season.

Because let's face it: They've had plenty of opportunities to kill each other, had their guns pointed at each other's faces, but neither one has ever able to pull the trigger. These two can't quit each other, and they shouldn't.

Are you as struck as I am by Miles and Monroe's relationship? What do you think the show should do with it?

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A few years ago historians started reconsidering Lincoln. Was he bisexual? Was he gay? He was clearly manic depressive. Why? Why did they ask these questions. Because he expressed his open love for men that he truly loved. He cared for and about them greatly. This was before the first radios and telegraphs were brand new. Relationships were stronger and more intense because the stakes were higher. I think one day we're going to find that love, friendship, caring, respect and reciprocity - common to most good human relationships gay or straight - are a healthy outgrowth of the human survival instinct.

I believe the reason people are so lonely is because we took something - sex - we made it banal. We made it a physical thing with little or no tie to what we're feeling and then we wondered why the monster we created made us so numb.

Men and women need to love and be loved; respect and be respected; feel useful; take care of and be taken care of; experience friendship and trust; love physically and emotionally, platonically and carnally. These are normal things.

Add intensity involving human survival of any kind and I suspect if we took chemical measurements of people's brains - if we drew blood and did deep analyses we'd probably find that Dopamine is higher in men and women who experience these things. These two men experienced nearly every emotion together. That they grew close is pretty normal. Their relationship may have even been physical.

Little known is that "he men" such as Picasso and Hemingway - known for their intense female sexual conquests - both experienced one or more deep emotional and physical relationships with other men. In Picasso's case when he was about 13 or 14 he had a love affair with a young man from his village. It was passionate and short lived but he admitted later it was much deeper than some of his female relationships. Was he bisexual? I don't think so.

Miles Matheson and Ben have an emotional relationship this is probably not very healthy since they seem to express their camaraderie in some pretty disturbing ways. Sexuality isn't binary. Many men and women would like it to be - it is clearly not.
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I think their relationship harkens back to the days when men weren't ashamed to show their love for other men...and not necessarily in a sexual way. We have a funny perspective of male friendship in modern society. Women can form strong bonds with each other, show jealousy of their bestie's affections, tell one another we love them, cry over the loss of a friend to the point where we can genuinely say we're heartbroken, etc...and no one thinks anything of it. However, if a man does the same thing, he's thought of as harboring sexual feelings towards his friend. Not condemning you on this; I am merely recognizing that society tends to think this way. I remember reading Shakespearean plays in school and having all the kids titter about whenever one male character expressed his love for another. Shouts of "he's gay" would ring out. Don't know when love and sex became synonymous in this country or why a trait of masculinity is to be emotionally distant from anyone except those they are romantically involved with, but I like how Kripke isn't afraid of making the relationship deeper, even in the face of those who would shout "they're gay" from the back of the room.
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I haven't seen all of the show (only a few episodes), but from what I saw no one has the chemistry that Miles and Monroe have (whether or not it's totally platonic).

I don't think their chemistry is an accident by any means. Kripke works on this and he tries to cast people with great chemistry to be his central "couple." He did it on Supernatural, too. Like Supernatural, I do not think there are any genuine romantic emotions between Miles and Monroe, but I do think that they have feelings for each other that are intense enough that it's often categorized as romantic because no one writes friends who are each other's be-all and end-all (even if more people should). They're brothers, best friends, worst enemies, family, and a lot of other intense things all rolled into one. It doesn't even need the help of romance (this goes for Supernatural as well).

And I think Neville's comment was Kripke and the writers poking a little fun at the fans (who I assume have started shipping Miles and Monroe already). And also poking a little fun at themselves at the same time.

So while I don't think Miles and Monroe are romantically or erotically codependent (lol!), I do think their relationship is by far the best thing on the show. But one of the reasons I KNOW they aren't romantically involved is because network TV only writes same sex romance as SAME SEX ROMANCE. They can't be two people who happen to like each other in the midst of a large plot. It has to be about them LIKING MEN (or at least one man). Because apparently being gay (or a guy sleeping with a guy, at least) is a BIG DEAL on TV. Should it be? No. But seriously, TV doesn't write people who are a million things and happen to be gay. It's all about being gay all the time.

But do I think it'd be awesome if they actually were a (romantic) couple? Hells yeah. I'd probably even watch the show regularly. I don't care what anyone's sex is, if they have awesome romantic chemistry (which none of the other couples on the show do), I'm in!
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There may or may not be a homoerotic subtext to their relationship but whatever it is, as bad as the writing is, everything in this show might well be completely unintentional.
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I've been wanting Revolution to be played as a melodrama for a while now. It fails as a sci-fi wannabe, so go all out with the operatic schmaltz. At least it's fun. You are right that it's because there's "genuine characterization and emotion at play". It's rare to really care about these people.

To pound the SPN comparison, Rachel is 100% John Winchester and Charlie the poorass version of Dean (no substitutes), and they are primed for a knock down melodrama too. With Ben Edlund (damn u Kripke) coming over, some humor and melodrama could be good (can't say great lol).
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Tim, I don't know/care what your sexual preference is but I think you should get out more. Nothing wrong with two male leads having a strong brotherly past. Give up on the homoerotica. It's beneath you.
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I don't think Tim's point was to push a homoerotic agenda, I think it was to point out the obvious undertones (and overtones) of the writing. And to express the opinion that this is the most interesting part about the show.
Why should that be beneath him?
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It's beneath him because it seems like a clear attempt to attach the current zeitgeist about homosexuality to a place where it doesn't exist, very much like what happened with the hobbits in the Lord of the Rings films.

It also reinforces the mistaken (and perhaps psychologically damaging) notion that men can't be emotionally attached to one another without there being sexual feelings involved. Much of modern culture would have us believe that a man can't say "I love you" to another man without homosexual overtones. But that's not what history shows us, and it's not what human nature shows us.

So my objection (and probably gtbell's, I would guess) is that what you claim are "obvious undertones" are not obvious and, in fact, don't exist here. Perhaps you (and Time) think they do because you've been told to look for them.

I think the prevalent attitude of "finding gays under every bush" is just as bad when pro-homosexual people do it as when anti-homosexual people do. It does a disservice both to gay men who love other men in sexual and non-sexual ways, and to straight men who love their male friends like true brothers.

In short: enough with looking for homosexuality everywhere. It is where it is, and it isn't where it isn't. And it (probably) isn't in Revolution.
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Completely agree with you ninjaandy; it's always seemed to me that Surette has a problem with guys being close to other guys. I imagine he's been raised with the usual male idea that such close ties are 'sissy' and 'queer'. So of course when such an instance appears on a tv show he immediately assumes the relationship has got to be homosexual in nature.

Sadly the constant message he then sends out in his reviews to other males is therefore "don't get attached to male friends, or show them you care, or other men will think you're gay. They're so obviously gay for each other in this show that it's brokeback revolution!"

Case in point, my daughter's 15 and a boy at her school is very close to a pal of his as they've known each other since playschool. There's issues in the other boy's life that my daughter's friend is trying to support him through - things that aren't common knowledge at the school. Yet every time my daughter's friend tries to support and be there for his best friend everyone around them guffaws nastily and coughs "queer" at them.

My daughter's furious about it and says it shouldn't matter if they were gay, but they're not. She asked me why can't they just be close pals without all the bullying? I showed her Surette's article and said "this is why - even grown men would say they're gay."

She told me Surette's article is promoting the sort of attitude that means her friends are being bullied at school.

Here's an FYI for Surette - I do actually have a homosexual cousin who is in a long term relationship now. When I gave him the link to Surette's article, he fell about laughing and said the guy had obviously never met a real gay in his life or he was just trying to be deliberately provocative. I know what I think it is......
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I don't think anyone was looking for anything, under bushes or elsewhere. The writers on the show Wrote In a line in which one of the characters pointed out exactly what we have been talking about- the possibility that what's-his-name has a crush on that vampire chick's dad. Homosexually. If the writers themselves hadn't brought up the subject, I probably wouldn't have thought of it at all.
Thanks for the dissertation, though.
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Tom mentioned it to insult Bas, not to actually point out a truth. He's not actually serving as the over-obvious mouthpiece of the writers.

Other clues from the show overwhelmingly demonstrate Miles' and Bas' relationship being brotherly, and both of them also being straight as razorblades. One off-hand insult from a bad guy shouldn't be taken as a repudiation of all that came before, especially when there's another, more likely, explanation.
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I also support the Miles/Monroe romance. I think you portrait the other relationships on the show perfectly: as romantic as a slaughterhouse. Miles and Monroe really do have a lot of chemestry and clearly deep feelings towards one another. It is by far Revolution's most interesting and intriguing storyline. I say go for it. If done right, I could develop into something beyond great, giving Revolution a unique spice.
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And how can the reviewer still not know that the show was never about people trying to survive the blackout after 15 years?! It was about people vying for power since the very beginning. That's just lazy observation, Tim.
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The minute when a guy opens up his heart about how much another guy means to him and how much he respects and loves him (in a brotherly way), then everybody thinks they have homo tendencies. What is wrong with this world! Or maybe this is just in America. But one thing I do agree on is that there are powerful scenes when Miles and Monroe share the screen. I had hoped Revolution would become great by the end of the season, but it hasn't happened. It isn't a deal breaker though since the show is quite entertaining.
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I love how every single review I've run across about this finale has been 20% screaming about the sheer stupidity of EVERYTHING and 80% real-talk about the homoerotic "subtext" of Miles and Monroe.

I think the subtext between the two, that everyone and their grandmother is commenting on, happened on purpose... accidentally. What I mean by that is, all of Kripes' writing and show running weaknesses he displayed in Supernatural (poor pacing, plotholes, logic free plotlines, retconning the rules of his established world repeatedly to fit a throw-a-way storyline, no respect for distances between places, characters seeming to have schizophrenic personality disorders with themselves and with others to fit a storyline, heteronormative romantic relationships being tossed in haphazardly to be lifeless and somehow misogynist before disappearing and forgotten (unless one of the prominent male characters needs some unrelated angst to round out the hour), male relationships that are supposed to come off as platonic or familial, but continuously drawing the side-eyes of: I don't think these phrases mean what you think they mean), but with a bigger budget.

Fangirl Notice: I like SPN. It has Jensen Ackles, who is hot and can act. There is Misha, too. Jared's fabulous lion mane.A badass car. And MAGIC and full-fledged criminal behavior to lay my weary head to rest about logical real world concerns.

Miles and Monroe are pretty much the only interesting relationship the show has semi-established. However, I think they've already squandered what could have been a compelling storyline, pretty much like the whole premise and execution of the show. They've shown Monroe unhinged, he's contributed to the deaths of Miles' actual brother and nephew (and that random long-lost love interest); I know people forget why they're angry mid-episode on this show, but this is a bit much to handwave. I mean, the nanites can no longer be used as an excuse for the blown circuits in everyone's brains.

But since, the show sucks as is, I'll play.

It wouldn't be out of nowhere to have season 2 open up with Monroe spilling his unrequited love woe over drinks to a stranger, thus bringing about a gentle dawning of awareness in the few audience members that never cottoned on to his gayness (or Miles-ness). I assume these are the same viewers who don't see a damn thing wrong with the science or magic portals the walking "heroes" use to get across the US on foot.

Monroe I can see as loving Miles since childhood and taking out his frustrations of not being loved in return or refusing to acknowledge his romantic feelings towards Miles and sublimating his desires by banging his women and later "killing them". Miles has been shown to be a commitphobe cad with the ladies and Monroe (shit gets real, he can't deal). His scene in the finale quickly lampshaded Nevile's on point observation in the preceding scene, by using the "brothers" line. I actually sighed in annoyance, well in addition to my always present annoyance with this show. To get past his already established apparent obliviousness to Monroe wanting the D and the ring, uh...do a flashback with Old man Matherson beating or preaching the gay out young Miles after catching him holding hands and sneaking puppy love kisses with little Monroe. It would explain why he's repressed after living and serving during the repeal of DADT and the world coming to an end. They can precede from there with either sinking or sailing the ship.

Shite. I can't believe I wrote so much on this crap ass show. Insomnia, y'all.
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lol I completely and 110% agree with you sir, theres been a monstrosity amount of homoerotic subtext going on an i been saying that from the beginning! Thanks for finally announcing that shit to the world! lol But in reality, it does make for the best episodes of the series when they have scenes together, an thats no bull.
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Hmm, I feel the same way, towards my brother and best friend (female). I guess that would make me bisexual (and in this case incestuous); wow, I have been living a lie, my entire life! I guess when people utter the clichéd, but meaningful words: "I would take a bullet for you," they really mean: "I want to have sex with you" (subconsciously of course)!

Sometimes your own perspective, seeps into objectively-intended analysis. If this was supposed to be a hidden subtext, it wouldn't have been so blatantly shoved into our faces. Kripki (one of the creators) has a habit of inserting close and intimate (possibly co-dependent), but non-sexual/erotic, relationships, as one of the main components in his shows (I.E. the brothers in "Supernatural"). Maybe he's attracted to men, also!

Point being, there are some people in your life, who you put in front of you. I would probably do the same thing (little less cruel), that which Monroe did, if someone tried to kill my brother. People on such shows try to rile things up (for ratings probably), by sprinkling in innuendos (as such). They are present in, almost all "best friend," and similar themed story lines (even non best friend shows, have obvious intimations, to dramatize and get more viewership). So, if you are falling for such stuff, maybe analyzing shows should be left to others.
On a separate, but related note: You might want to read some: Jung (C.G), Freud, and Kinsey, to start with; if you want to psychoanalyze things. It might be enlightening. Maybe, try caring about someone more than yourself (I apologize, if my inference of you being self-centered, is incorrect). incase it's not, it may give you insight, into why people defy their own innate sense of preservation, to protect their loved ones.

Finally, I don't mean to insult you in any way. I am just stating my opinion (emphasis on opinion). Thanks for reading!
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I get most of you points and I agree with almost all you wrote but asking Tim to educate himself and implying that you know Tim's self-centered when you never actually met him is going overboard. The last sentence doesn't take away your insults. Don't get me wrong now I actually liked your comment.
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I think that writers of Revolution should pursue this homoerotic relationship between Miles Monroe.

1) Revolution is not doing the best as a series; the show, at its current pace will probably survive one more season.
2) Pursuing a homoerotic relationship is upsetting and provocative enough to garner interest from the right and wrong people.
3) It's something that hasn't been done (in the modern era) on an A-list show that isn't forced or completely unexpected (so long as it isn't forced or unexpected).

I feel, that if the writers do pursue this type of history/present/future between Miles & Monroe, the audience should come away from the experience only touching on that uncanny string in their psyche BUT agree with what just happen.
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Agree and disagree. The relationship is not ultimately what the show is about, so even if they pursue a homoerotic angle it'll just make the show into more of a drama. IF they pursue said angle, it should be kept somewhat subtle while still pursuing other arcs in the show's main story.
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I can't believe that no-'one's created a Miles & Monroe montage and set it to the Brokeback mountain theme yet. :-)
Yep. Completely agree their relationships is the most interesting aspect of the show (apart from Giancarlo's performance - the man is absolutely brilliant!) and I hope they take Tim's advice and run with it.
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Giancario's performance in this show is absolutely weak compared to what it was in Breaking Bad, save for the episode where it showed his past before the blackout (that was fantastic). Definitely a great actor, but with the writing in this show I find his character hard to believe.
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I have said from day one of this show that the only interesting thing about it was Myles and Monroe, particularly their relationship (which I always felt was more than "friends"/"brothers"). I would love them to focus on that more, though to be fair I haven't watched the 2nd half of this season the first one was too painful and I predicted it would go along the lines of a Myles-Monroe truce to overcome someone worse like Neville taking charge. But hell if there are more Monroe-Myles scenes I might try to suffer through it.
General question though, I haven't been up to date on the show or the reviews but do these to have a shipping name yet or whatever you call it?
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... An open homoerotic drama plot-line between the two of them might actually convince me to get back to watching Revolution.
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You're joking right?
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Well, well, hell froze and I actually agreed with Tim's review. I'm just not sure his mocking humor would be appropriate to explore the possible homoerotic nuances of the Monroe/Miles relationship, considering the times we live in and that, for some people, this is not something to be joked about, as they are particularly sensitive about it.

Anyway, the fact Neville spells that out means the writers are perfectly aware of that, and no, this kind of complexity was not reached by random means. While most relationships are sketchy at best, the Monroe/Miles one has been explored in more details (no not as many graphical ones and some people wish to see).

On the other hand, I never really saw any chemistry between Miles and Nora (and truth be told, she wasn't much more than a distraction), and even though Aaron lived very close to Charlie in that idyllic agro-village and was dragged into this heroic quest by Charlie's father, Aaron and Charlie behave like they met in the beginning of the show and still don't know each other. And now that that English lady is gone it's like she never existed. But the writers really cared about developing whatever was going on between Miles and Bass.

I just think that one man can have some sort of attraction for another, a strong connection perhaps he'll never have with any woman, but even then not even think of making it something physical or necessarily sexual. And the opposite is also true. A man can have a fondness for another and even want to engage physically and sexually with the other man without necessarily having a strong bond or spiritual connection. Human relationships can be something very complex.

Of course since we're talking about fictional characters only developed over the course of a few episodes, we can always find a homosexual vibe if that's what we are looking for. After reading Tim's review, I started thinking... Why does Lex Luthor obsess with Superman? Hell has no fury like a man scorned?
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*coughs* Kon-El/Connor Kent/Alexander Luthor/Super Boy *cough* Biological child of Supes and Lex *wheeze*
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OH, MY GOD! You're totally right! Supes would be asking Luthor for child support, since the baldy is so well off if only that universe hadn't been erased and their lovechild fallen into oblivion... Unless the new Superboy also comes from the same ill-fated gene match.
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Agreed. I think, Freud and Kinsey would have a great time with our beloved reviewer!
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Detractors talk about laziness in writing like Revolution invented laziness on TV. Just two CW darlings had the same title for the season finale (Arrow and Supernatural), the pretty generic "Sacrifice." Come on, isn't sacrifice what every single TV hero eventually does?

And I was catching up on the last episodes of Arrow and Person of Interest, and both had episodes had the VERY SAME plot idea for an episode. A computer genius (Harold/Felicity) tries to hack into Bad Guy's corporation computer/intranet/whatever system. But it so happens Bad Guy has super-ultra-über security firewall or stuff and all attempts by Genius Hacker are blocked. (with the creative detail that they actually make Harold's laptop actually EXPLODE with a command!)

"It's impossible," says Genius Hacker. We'd have to access it from the inside.
"No problema," says tough Guy/Alpha Male Character/Resident Muscle (John Reese/Oliver Queen). "We'll break into the place." And then an elaborate and equally successful plan follows and this ultra-mega-hyper secure place is physically breached by a relatively simple ploy in like ten minutes.

OH, and I loved the special touch when Oliver comes out of an elevator through the top, and then extends his arm to "lift" Felicity, but we can notice that she is visibly climbing the steps of a ladder conveniently placed inside the elevator.

Oh, boy and for a moment I actually thought "force pairing" a cell phone actually existed... I feel so stupid...
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Really?? Tim, you watched the entire season. The show has never been about society trying to survive the blackout--that's just what you wanted it to be, from day one you wanted the show to be about a post-apocalypse wasteland. It's not, and never has been that's why it started 15 years after the blackout. The blackout just made the world the way it is--power is literally power, etc, etc. Continuing to say that is like saying Game of Thrones was about a society trying to get ready for the coming of winter.
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You're absolutely write. The problem is that many people, for some reason, are still stuck in what NBC's initial promo seemed to promise (something like"a society that struggles to function when all forms of energy cease to exist"). For some reason those people still expecting that show to happen without realizing that the title "Revolution" would actually indicate the overthrow of a government. I don't know, unless they were expecting something like an "Industrial" Revolution...
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I think if you've watched the show it's pretty clear: The survival and the blackout premises that lasted an episode and a half were in order to start the Revolution. Maybe people are still hanging onto that because the promise of a post apocalyptic blackout whatever show was so much more interesting than what Revolution turned out to be in all its craziness....
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Personally I don't think that would be *so* much more interesting. There are tons of survival-in-the-post-apocalyptic-world stories around. That would just be one more of them.
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There's always more you can explore with survival-in-the-post-apocalyptic-world because it's about showing people's true colors when faced with extreme change, and how everyone's competing to earn their part of the "new" world. I personally don't think is that monotone, it can take different shapes. You just need to know how to mold them correctly.
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Hahahahha yeah, I never get tired of watching new shows apparently. Until they turn to pure shit xD
The Danny plot is exactly what I mean, they used this plotline that, ok, I would have shot someone in the face if they kept looking for him the entire season, but once they found him, they turned him into a plot device in less than 30 seconds and killed him because he wasn't necessary anymore. That shows a major lack of development from every point of view possible...
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Yes, I agree it would be nice if they had developed the world better and longer. The way I see things, a show can be cancelled very quickly, so they decided to go to the core of their central idea (a revolution, that is) right in the first season. And the whole Danny quest was essentially a waste of time. But a sci-fi show can go in so many directions, and I believe viewers will never be totally satisfied because they'll always imagine something different.

As for the other shows, maybe I'm more tired of post-apocalyptic shows than you, that's all. I would have a hard time seeing yet another show about survivors in the wasteland fighting for food/water/gasoline/medicine/weapons/ammunition and against zombies/aliens/infected people/the rise of the machines/people maddened by the fact there is no more law and order anymore... Yes, the shows are different in some ways, but so much alike in others which define them.
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Even with the same premise, they are all different. I may complain about it but I still watch the show, therefore I like it, so don't get me wrong, it's not like I hate the way Revolution is being made. But I would have liked if they had sticked to the original premise a while longer. If the mystery of the power going off and trying to begin a Revolution with that would have lasted a bit longer. I like that power is back on and Monroe's had power since episode like 8 but I can't help but think that if they'd held it for at least the entire season, I don't know, but it'd be more compelling because things would've had time to develop.
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Well, I guess we'll have to agree to disagree on that one. You see, when they announced Revolution, I also thought the same as many other people and groaned. I thought, "Well, one more post-apocalyptic survival drama... Survivors in rags desperately trying to make it in the wasteland... How many times do they have to tell the very same story with minor variations? We already have mad Max, Resident Evil, The Walking Dead (and all of the other countless zombie movies), H+, Jericho, Afterworld, Falling Skies... And I'm sure there are others I forgot to mention. Do we really need another version of the same old story told the very same way?" Well, I'm so glad they actually didn't follow that path.
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Ok, truth. But it's still more promising than what it is right now.
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We love to hate this ensemble of terrible scripting, lack of cohesive cognizance, insane characterization and downright lazy science, and so Revolution has been renewed. The only sure thing that would/could strike a death blow to this fabulously inane series would be The Torchwood Error. It ain't gonna happen, not since Bafta's best have tried and failed.
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If you want lazy science you should watch Person If Interest, unless you're one of those people afraid your phone will be "force paired" with one touch of a button...
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Everyone thought it. Neville freaking said it. And now, Tim has written about it. Yes. This. All of this. I take this article for the seriousness that it truly is. I mean, yes Revolution is more so one of those shows where you kind of watch it and you make fun of it and it's just good, solid fun. I love ragging on this show. But Tim, you are absolutely right in that, the strongest, most solid, best written relationship is the Miles and Monroe one. They are shockingly at their best when they were playing off of one another. IT's the best characterization to date. There is something unquestionably fascinating about the pair of them. It's honestly when Monroe as a character is at his best. The obsession and fixation he has on Miles. I swear I rewound it twice when Neville said that and I laughed so hard my stomach hurt, not because it was a fantastic line with great delivery but because it was so TRUE.

I don't think anyone would be reading too much into the subtext of their relationship in saying that. It's not a normal bromance. It's not a normal rivalry. Not in the everyday since. Monroe gets straight up Glenn Close in Fatal Attraction crazy eyes when it comes to Miles, and man, it's so freaking awesome. It's probably, it's definitely the best part of the show. I'm thinking that with that line in there like that, it's acknowledgement that they either know that the subtext is there now or it's been intentionally implemented from the beginning. I hope they go with it. the show flounders in trying to grasp on to that one thing that's the foundation of the show. This relationship, that could end up being unlike anything else we've seen on TV if it continues in this fashion, could be that foundation. The solid thing that holes it all together.
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*holds
ugh, I type too fast for my own good. I think Monroe is crazy, obviously. But he's obsessed and fixated on Miles. Miles on the other hand really does see Monroe as a brother. It just makes for a very interesting something to watch with them.
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Honestly, if the writers actually went somewhere with this, I would totally start watching this show again. It's probably the only thing that could get me watching this show again. I stopped watching after the big mid-season break (which btw, NBC, was a huge mistake, because I liked the mid-season finale, but after so many months without the show, I lost interest). Back when I did watch it, though, the characters I was most intrigued by were Miles and Monroe, and their relationship (I know Monroe is a total psycho, but I like him. Not sure why).
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I am just glad it is over, even if for short while. I have bad habit not to leave a show once I started and I had to go through it. I don't know if I will be able to hold myself from the series or continue but for now it is relaxing without it.
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Lyons has always played Monroe in a non-traditionally threatening way, especially whenever he discusses Miles. He always treats huge events as personal responses: so Miles causing huge amounts of trouble is a personal attack on him. And Monroe is okay with killing entire hordes of people so long as it affects Miles.

It's clear that the show doesn't believe that there's a romantic relationship there (family, family, FAMILY for an NBC drama doesn't include we gays), but there is definitely something more to the way Lyons (and maybe Burke) plays it
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Giancarlo Esposito deserves to be in a better show.
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Except I don't want him to leave because he has the best lines in this show. I'm still going around telling people that they can be the General of My Nuts when they piss me off. LULULZ.
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I'm with you! In the beginning his role was great, but I haven't watched the show for ages, can't stand it. I was sorry see him leave BB (but he had to go eventually), but the man is one of TV's best. I hope he gets cast in something better soon.
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"Rachel and Miles have a spark, that Miles and Nora are former lovers, and that Jason and Charlie are in love (all three of those relationships are as romantic as a slaughterhouse), "

Be honest that's only really true about Miles and Nora.
Too soon??
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OK, I say that Monroe does/is in love with Miles - always has been, since childhood. Which is why he has to bed anything Miles has - hence the so called son out there. Miles knows but doesn't want to accept this. He, more than likely, does think of Monroe as a brother, Ben looks the type that would have kept his head stuck into books or computers & didn't have the time or energy for stupid kids games or his stupid little brother. The bond between Miles & Ben is only a thread, compared to the rope between Miles & Monroe.

Now onto another bond, Miles & Charlie, my thinking is that there's a good chance it's Father/Daughter. With Miles & Rachel having had a fling before the blackout, which is very clear within the story line so far. It would also explain why they (Ben & Rachel) were so worried about Danny, both before & after birth - a child born out of "true love" & not lust - & why Charlie has always seemed to have come second.
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I stopped watching this show but I might just watch it again if the writers do expand further on Monroe and Miles' relationship. The way you described it, it sounds really interesting. I don't believe any show on a network has portrayed a relationship like this either whether it was intentional or not. But like you said, this kind of thing can't be a coincidence if the writers made the effort to have a character call Monroe out on his feelings. But there begs the question if the writers meant to be funny and not take it seriously or they meant to be funny and serious.
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All well and good, but I just see Monroe as batshit crazy, so whatever's in his mind is probably quite warped...
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I don't watch this show, but that second video with Miles/Monroe is like...a straight-up romantic speech.
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I kinda saw it after their first flashback, but it still seems pretty loose. Still, I'd probably enjoy them just going at for a good 40 minutes than the stuff they usually show. At the very least it would make more sense.
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This is one of the most entertaining character analyses I've read this season. There is definitely serious tension. I think that Monroe is the impetus of most (but not all) of the overt homoeroticism and the crazy. Miles is understandably reticent to off the guy he'd been attached at the hip to from infancy, closer than his own brother even, but he's not really giving off the vibe as much, perhaps because he's juggling too many love interests and trying to play the erstwhile hero for his niece/daughter. (I'm not really certain Charlie as Miles's daughter works however, because Monroe's son is meant to be only 16, and Charlie is 19-ish, so I have my doubts on this theory.)

Based on the flashbacks, Monroe early on seemed to have that natural rivalry/competition thing with Miles that alpha-type boys have, going so far as to knock up Miles's high school sweetheart before the boys shipped out to basic together (a total dick move, but totally Monroe as it was obvious he also had a thing for Rachel as well). At least one of them made a serious effort to keep the band together before the blackout because it isn't all that easy to ensure 2 military careers stay perfectly aligned over time - the military brass doesn't care if they are BFFs and have never been separated, they assign men where they need them, plus they'd be competing for the same promotions all the time if they maneuvered to stay in the same units/regiments. But then things start getting a little tight around the collar in the Matheson/Monroe saga. Perhaps he sustained some sort of traumatic brain injury in that bombing that injured Miles, and that was why Monroe totally overreacted by killing the wife and children of the rebel bomber and then going completely OFP after that. Whatever the reasons, Monroe definitely began to show more than brotherly love toward Miles at some point shortly before or after the rebel bombing that continues to direct his behavior.

I'm most fascinated by Miles and his inability (unwillingness?) to fight gravity in this relationship. In the wake of regaining consciousness and learning Monroe had killed a bunch of innocent women and children in his name, why did Miles choose to act as he did? Why try to kill Bas in his sleep and then run away? Why not try to talk to him, figure out why he did it? It seems obvious to me that if Miles had told Bas that his actions were unquestionably bat shit crazy that Monroe, given his profound obsession with Miles, at best would have been compelled to examine his actions for something a little closer to sanity, and at least he possibly could have been manipulated and controlled by his desire to maintain his connection with Miles. I will admit that is an extreme level of responsibility for one adult to have for another, and no doubt Miles must have felt trapped with no good choices. I guess the answer is that we already know that Miles can be something of a coward and ne'er do well when it comes to responsibility, he doesn't like to have any sort of confrontation except from behind a sword or gun, and we can now assume that it was his guilt at both abandoning Monroe and failing to rein him in (and the countless lives lost as a result of that choice) that sent Miles into hiding at the bottom of a bottle in that bar in Chicago where Charlie found him. Not to mention the mess of his relationships with Nora and Rachel and the hinted at possibility that Charlie is his daughter all adding up to Miles being his own flavor of crazy. Which makes for juicy, interesting television.

Tim, I appreciate your call for social progressiveness and asking the writers to continue exploring the sexual ambiguity seething in the Matheson/Monroe duo and I second it. If any genre of television is best equipped to challenge the status quo on social issues and has a long history of doing so, it is sci-fi, and I think the show will be much more interesting than it might be otherwise for taking on such a risk.
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Maybe NBC is gearing up to move the show over to Bravo. That could easily explain all of this.
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LOL
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Now how did I know this was a Tim Surette article without looking at the author?
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Because he males clear reference to having written the reviews? I was surprised, actually, he doesn't really push the guy-on-guy shipping as much as some of the other writers.
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Actually I knew it was Tim by the title thanks to his consistently negative reviews of the show I've always agreed with. I haven't read the article since I have yet to watch the season finale and my last episode of the show yet.
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Wasn't it implied that they had a threesome with Sierra?
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This is hilarious
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SPOILERS -SPOILERS - SPOILERS - SPOILERS - SPOILERS - SPOILERS -

Can I just repeat that there are........SPOILERS. Okay go ahead.....


Munroe wants a family; ANY family, and Miles is as close to that as he's going to get. I reckon if he found his 'son' (if he even exists and that woman wasn't lying just to try and save her sorry cheating behind), then I don't think he'd give a rat's bottom about Miles anymore. Likewise if he found someone who fell in love with him (I'm going with female, but whatever) then again I don't think Miles would bear a moment's remembering.

Munroe is desperately lonely; and I mean *desperately*. Feeling that isolated, that abandoned, can really mess with people's heads. That's why I think Munroe's been losing it more and more each week. Wanting someone to be his best pal at least, someone he can trust entirely; instead he worries that they don't mean it and they'll abandon him like Miles did.

So he thinks he should show them they MUST be loyal to him - much torture and bloodshed loom as some hapless red shirt is used as the unwilling sacrifice, while his new BFF looks on in muted horror. It freaks them out so much that they either run away (Miles) or stay and try and do their best to reassure him, but die anyway (Joseph).

I think the writers really need to start reeling Munroe in a little as, for me at least, he's becoming almost a cartoon 'bad guy' he's so evil now. So much so that I'm only really waiting for the writers to give the character a mustache he can twirl, to prove me right. So I think they should bring in a love interest for Munroe - even if it's just to see if it *would* make a difference to his mindset if he had someone *he* knew truly loved *him*, someone he could trust implicitly and the writers made them stay loyal to him.

I think it could be a good move too as the homoerotic thing is all very well, but it's not going anywhere. As much as they're close, they're NEVER going to be *that* kind of close. So it's time they moved the two characters on. If there was a love interest for Munroe then it would be a plot device they could use too - have the love interest (whatever gender; I'm going with female, but it doesn't really matter) kidnapped by Rachel (because that woman is COLD; kick a puppy cold) and either tortured or murdered in retaliation for Danny Boy. Whether or not Munroe got them back alive, I think he'd enter revenge mode with bells on territory.

They could also bring the son into it; maybe have him with a woman who won't let Munroe have him even if threatens her, he admires that and so takes her too. Instant family sure - but not something he's used to; especially if the writers could make them tough and not likely to be bossed around by him. Then he's in the same boat Miles is; people he's stuck with, but who he comes to love.

It'd bring a nice sub story to the whole show - would Munroe still be as keen to slaughter everyone; knowing the families he's killing are much like his own? Would he continue to hunt Miles and his loved ones; knowing that if he kills *them* and not Miles - his ex-bestie will be gunning for Munroe's nearest and dearest. Would he listen if the son and/or woman pleaded with him not to kill so many? Or would he completely mellow out and just go all zen? The latter is seriously unlikely - the guy's dancing on the edge of insanity, about to reach the tipping point at any second; He might step back and change, even a lot, but never totally overnight.

It would certainly be more interesting than watching a 'relationship' going nowhere because either Miles had made it painfully and brutally obvious he will not bat for *that* team with Munroe, or he ran away because he was bored torturing people. Munroe's increasingly pantomime villain characterisation just makes it all worse. So dial Munroe back, I love David Lyon as the character, but the poor man is going to be foaming at the mouth soon if the writers keep this up.
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I'm inclined to agree with some of your analysis of Monroe's motivations but I'm unclear how you feel so certain that "the homoerotic thing" is watching a 'relationship' going nowhere because either Miles had made it painfully and brutally obvious he will not bat for *that* team with Munroe". I don't think Miles has made that clear. I'm pretty certain from the text of his article that Tim is actually arguing that in fact the writers have not yet made it clear the nature, past, present and future, of the relationship between Miles and Monroe and that there is something compelling there if they choose to explore it.

I think it a tad narrow of you to want to solve all of Monroe's problems by finding him a nice girl to settle down with, when really he is pining for the bad boy on the down low. It would be contrite and simplistic to give Monroe an instant family and poof! all his problems are solved. The current paradigm, as messy and ambiguous as it is, is actually both more entertaining and more realistic, because real life is messy and families aren't perfect the way they can be in Hollywood, and as they say, truth is stranger than fiction. Honestly, if you were writing Monroe's story for S02, I wouldn't be watching.

If you definitely need to slot a female in there, I'd be more inclined to see Rachel find a zen place of forgiveness (which would be a great sub-plot to explore anyway) and go all polyamory with Miles and Monroe, rather than to find Monroe a convenient plot device female love interest and everyone hide from the homoeroticism and pretend we never went there. We've already gone there, time to let the freak flag fly.
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Actually I'm not bothered about whether Munroe's love interest is either gender, which I did say above. Having both a homosexual and a lesbian cousin I have absolutely no problem with HLBT community on any level.

However Miles comes across as *deeply* uncomfortable with Munroe's devotion so, if it is homoerotic, then he obviously is not reciprocating and therefore the relationship is going nowhere.

I also don't think that finding a love interest (of either gender, as I've stated before) for Munroe is going to solve all his problems. Just dial him back from the mustachio twirling panto villain he's becoming and give him a whole different set of problems - both real and potential plot lines - to solve.

Rachel is a sociopath - she cares about Rachel; maybe the death of her favourite offspring affected her, perhaps she just wants revenge because something of 'hers' was taken away. The only thing I see is a woman with no feelings - she will not reach 'zen place' without the writers coming up with something HUGE to enable it.

I have no problem with homoeroticism, despite your snide remarks to the contrary, but am I straight so would like a straight relationship for Munroe; no doubt a homosexual would prefer a gay relationship and a lesbian is focusing on the female characters and where they're going - I'll have to ask my cousins about that.

But I did ask them about Miles and Munroe, they both agree that if one is straight, and they believe Miles is, then that is a 'dead end' right there.You can no more turn someone gay than you can make a gay person straight. They find both insulting and so do I; it's a sloppy and lazy plot tactic. If you are desperate for slash, then the writers will have to bring another male character in for that to happen. I don't have a problem with that though.

So long as Munroe gets a love interest; someone to help him become a better character rather than the current panto one, I could care less about gender. My *personal* preference is hetro, because I am. If yours is slash, that's your *personal* preference. We are each entitled to our opinion. As for Tim; the guy loathes and despises this show - so I'm taking 99% of what he's written above as more of the same as his last offerings called 'reviews'.
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I had stopped watching. But now I might be interested again.
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Dear tv.com,

Why is that two characters of the same gender can't share the screen for more than twenty-seconds without a tv.com writer obsessing over "subtext"? (Even when the characters are semi-related?) (see Once Upon A Time)
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OUAT and Revolution are completely different though. Honestly, OUAT is mostly to me a set of shippers who just love the particular ship. I never seen any subtext that implies anything between Swan and Regina, but it's a popular ship and to each it's own. There is no deliberate or overt anything inserted into the show. Not yet. I don't knock the shippers for seeing and wanting that. I just also don't see the writers deliberately and intentionally putting something in to suggest otherwise between those two characters. If I had to say there was homo-erotic subtext anywhere in OUAT I'd say it was sapphic vibes between Aurora and Mulan. Those seemed more intentional and open to that kind of scrutiny.

Revolution it's there. It's intentional, blatant, in such a way that they actually made an outside character say as much. It's been carefully crafted in such a way to suggest that they are going for at the very least that kind of ambiguity. Monroe IS unhealthy obsessed and fixated on Miles. He is a bit nuts. It's the makeup of his character. It falls on him. I don't know if you watch Bates Motel but it's along the same lines of Norma's unhealthy fixation on her son, Norman. It's a subtext that's implemented in such a way that you can't ignore it. What comes of is up to the show and the writers, but unlike OUAT I don't think anyone is conjuring up anything that isn't already right there. In at least one of the characters.
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Aurora and Mulan are a valid example. I'm a bit surprised by the resurrection of Philip, unless it is to prove a hurdle for them to overcome, but how can that be it? Disney likes to keep their subtext, well, sub.
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I know right? But then how sub can it get these days when Evil Queen was actually telling people to send the Huntsman to her sex dungeon...or whatever. Sub-Dom madness.
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Tim is not the first person to comment on the weirdness of the relationship.
Monroe is very stalkerish about Miles
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As in batshit crazy...
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The guy has emotional issuess.... That is all xD
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That's completely different. There's nothing between those two. These two there is clearly something, even if its brotherly for one of them it is most certainly more for the other one.
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Lily Sparks, tv.com's writer who does the OUAT recaps would tell you very differently. Just read the captioned pictures for the season two finale. It is completely ridiculous.

Even the Person Of Interest recap/reviews have made mention of Reese/Finch "subtext".
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Haha! Subtext between Finch and Reese. My God! How can you even REMOTELY think that there's something between them? Who ever thought that needs to relax and realize they need to come up with something else because that's just insane!
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That was the point of my mentioning it. There's nothing there; and yet, tv.com writers have taken it upon themselves to poke at it.
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I think now you're trying to support your argument with the sarcastic humor of this site in general and all of it's reviewers. Lily may legitimately ship Regina and Swan (although she also said in comments that she knows that there is nothing currently that would fully support that shipping), but Tim teasing about the Reese and Finch sexual tension was straight up humor, not evidence that he ships the pairing or even sees such sexual tension. Also to be fair, people tease about "sexual tension" with any bromance. They aren't saying that they actually want to see the two characters going at it. It's all in humor. In Tim's case,with POI he was being humorous, and giving a nod to the many fans who actually ship that pairing.

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People see sexual tension everywhere if they wanna see it, but it doesn't mean there's actual evidence to legitimaze it.
In Revolution's case, there is. Neville said so himself, Monroe has a borderline erotic fixation on Miles Matheson. It is there and we can all see it, whether viewers accept it or not.
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Where have the POI reviews ever made mention of "Reese/Finch "subtext"."? I've been following those reviews from the first and I've never, ever seen Tim suggest anything like that. You are mischaracterizing in an effort to lend weight to a specious assertion. One zebra does not make a herd.
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That is one out of context reference in a network renewal announcement. Andy also makes all sorts of jokes in the "What to Watch Tonight" taglines. Should they all be taken literally rather than in the good humor they were offered? Again, the episode reviews do not make those sorts of references. Get a grip already.
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Quoted from a newstory written by Tim Surrette:

"– Person of Interest: One of the biggest surprises of the season. Can't wait for more sexual tension between Reese and Finch..."

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True.
But you cant trust zebra's
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I know very well what Lily would say, and if you search the comments on that very page you'll see me and others telling her that she's seriously stretching. She can be a bit of an extreme shipper sometimes. Tim doesn't really have that habit and he's not really wrong here. Maybe the entire writers room isn't in on it, but someone in that room is definitely shipping Miles and Monroe.
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There is no "writer's room" I don't believe...
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I never really notice this before but, now that someone has brought it to my attention there is definitely some relationship tension between Miles and Monroe. Season 2's handling of these characters' interaction will be very interesting.
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This makes the rather far-fetched assumption that these writers know what they're doing. Sledge Hammer: "I know what I'm doing."--KA-fucking-BOOM!!!
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on this show, yes, yes it does.
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It never gets old seeing tom Neville face after telling Monroe off that he has a erotic fixation and then feeling better for saying it. That was the funniest moment in that entire season to the point, seriously, i can't even count how many times i've watched it. They do act like an old married couple though.
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I don't think Monroe is gay for Miles. It's a non-sexual crush, like the one George had for one of Elaine's boyfriends on Seinfeld. (If you can still call it a "crush" after 15 years).
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The dialogue in this show almost seems like it was written for a video game. Its possible Miles or Monroe unlocked their 'Confirmed Bachelor Perk' like in Fallout New Vegas that reveals homosexual dialogue choices
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I hope it does happen, the hints have been there from fairly early on. Miles hallucinated hugging Bass in the same episode that Aaron hallucinated seeing his wife, Bass saying "if you die I'm dying with you" and "it was better, it was simpler with you here" if that doesn't sound like someone trying to get there ex to come back then I don't know what does. Also everyone seems to know that he does everything because of Miles, like Randall says "because that'll show Matheson" and after that Monroe threatens to kill so I'm guessing he was along the right lines.
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I doubt that Monroe is in love with Miles. At least consciously, it could very well be admiration that gets a little cloudy, mixed with transference from his baby mama dying and the finding out that he has a child somewhere, add in a heavy dose of creepy and there you have it.

Hilarious article though Tim. I think it was more shocking than Nora dying.
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You reminded me that's she's dead. I've already forgotten that. Doesn't that say it all?
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Yea, it kind of does.
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OK. I was feeling Ever.So.Lazy about watching this last episode. I was simply going to pass. But now after reading this article and watching the videos, now I WILL TOTALLY HAVE TO! Damn! It was just too much. And "eroticfixation" is such a fabulous new word!! -although being Spanish, I'd rather go with "erotifixation". It has a more rounded cadence, I think :)
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I'm sorry, everyone saying "Haven't you ever had a best friend?" is kinda weird. What kind of friendships do you have? My best friend is like my brother but we don't have tension like that. I have had tension like that with a friend --- who I wanted to bang.

But honestly, I could care less if this is intentional or a case of an actor going "method" on us but either way, all I care about is Juliet Burke and how much I love her.
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Juliet can sell everything really. I already had a crush on her since Lost, but now I'm totally obsessed with her. Can't wait till she gets even better material to work with.
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I wish the show had the guts to go for it but I am fairly certain that it won't happen.
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Its all purely innocent. You know, just two adults getting a stew on, man
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Totally agree with you Tim. Monroe is in love with Miles. I wonder now that we have a new villain (the President), will Miles team up with in love Monroe, useless Charlie, coward Aaron and psychopath Rachel ?
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"So obviously Revolution's writers are aware of it, right?"

Tim.. I'm pretty sure that 1) writing writers plural is a gross overestimation of the combined *ahum* talent of their staff and 2) that their staff isn't actually aware of anything, really.

But I agree, the show should explore this. It would make for some groundbreaking american television I'd wager. They already broke the mold by getting a second season without any particular effort to create anything worthwhile. So why not rebreak that mold by doing something the fans (I do consider you and me and everyone else still watching this a fan) would like to see.
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