Why Aren't There More Strong Female Friendships on TV?


There was a scene in the recent series premiere of USA's freshman buddy comedy Playing House that saw pregnant (and newly single) protagonist Maggie chase down her pal Emma as Emma made her way to the airport to return to her high-powered job in China. Maggie eventually caught up, told Emma she loved her in front of a whole crowd of people, and then begged Emma to stay and help her raise her baby. It was a nice play on the clichéd "race to the airport" scene that the movie industry has somehow tricked us all into thinking is romantic, and the bit ended with a bystander urging the two women to kiss as one of them explained that they're just really good friends. Not only was it funny, but it rewrote a boring trope in a way that highlighted the significance of strong female friendships—something that we don't see very often on television. 

Female friendships are often just as important, if not more so, than the romantic relationships usually portrayed in media. So why doesn't TV feature more of them? I mean, just think about how many shows revolve around a "bromance"—it's a term that's only become popular in recent years, but male friendships have been a small-screen staple for a very long time. That mine has been plundered so many times that no one even bats an eye when another series about dudes being dudes comes along. It's not that I dislike bromances—I'm guilty of loving Teen Wolf's Scott-and-Stiles friendship a bit too much, and I fondly recall Turk and JD's relationship on Scrubs—but I didn't realize until I started watching Playing House just how much TV is lacking deep, honest friendships between women. 

As Playing House has progressed (it's now five episodes into its debut season), we've seen Maggie and Emma's friendship grow beyond the simple premise-establishing set-up stories of the pilot. Emma often acts as Maggie's personal hype-woman when she's feeling less than beautiful because of her pregnancy. She's supported Maggie as Maggie has struggled with the reality of her impending divorce. When the two women were both interested in dating the same man, the show focused more on their friendship than on their respective romantic relationships. It's easy to see why they've been best friends for so long, and it's a treat to watch.

It makes me wonder why we don't see more of that sort of thing. It's not that strong female friendships don't exist on TV; Cristina and Meredith of Grey's Anatomy immediately come to mind (though who knows how much we'll see of that pairing we'll see in the wake of Sandra Oh's departure from the series). But they're very rarely the center of a series, and they're very rarely depicted as serving any purpose except being a vehicle for discussions about men. There's a reason the Bechdel test exists, and it's because women on TV often spend far too many scenes talking about the opposite sex when they could be conversing about literally anything else. Relationship drama will part of television until the end of time, but it's not the only thing that's interesting.

It's a baffling world we live in where many female TV characters are portrayed as stereotypical friends who secretly hate each other or who only care about finding a man. As a woman myself, I can honestly say that 95 percent of the conversations I have with my female friends are not about men. In fact, most of them have something to do with food, needing to find food, and the next time I'll be able to eat food. But I can't speak for all the ladies.


Television has showcased several iconic female friendships over the years, going as far back as Lucy and Ethel on I Love Lucy and Mary and Rhoda on The Mary Tyler Moore Show, but they're few and far between. Even shows that are praised for their true-to-life storytelling are often lacking in the Strong Female Friendships department. Consider Friday Night Lights: It's often been called one of the most sincere TV series ever made, but even though it featured several regular female cast members, most of the relationships were male/male or male/female. Or Battlestar Galactica: The most important relationships on that show were between Kara Thrace and the Adamas, never Kara and another woman. Or The West Wing: CJ Cregg was in a position of power, but when did she really interact with other women on more than a superficial basis? Or even Sex and the City: The main cast was all women, and they had very strong friendships, but holy crap those women spent way too much time talking about men and sex. Carrie, Miranda, Samantha, and Charlotte—and SATC itself—are important part of TV history, but that show doesn't exactly represent the average woman.

I've never considered myself to be a television viewer who's deeply concerned with gender bias—I've never been all that perturbed by, say, the lack of women on Supernatural, or by the way women are written on The Newsroom—but Playing House stands out. It feels like TV has finally gotten female friendship right. It's the foundation of the series, which in itself is memorable because most of the strong female relationships we've seen on TV in recent memory have been more of an added bonus, acting as just one aspect of any given series. Leslie's friendship with Ann was a highlight of Parks and Recreation, Buffy and Willow on Buffy the Vampire Slayer had a very strong friendship that grounded much of the series—especially when Willow eventually moved into the Summers house—and Lily and Robin on How I Met Your Mother proved that writers don't have to choose between showcasing male friendships and female friendships. But even though it's easy enough to name a handful of good ones, wouldn't it be nice if we didn't have to? If television as a whole portrayed female friendships more naturally, then we wouldn't feel compelled to point it out when a single show gets one right. Hopefully that day will come soon rather than later; in the meantime, here's a quick look back at some of our favorite female friendships on TV.

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What about Jo and Blair? :)
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That's because it's not so common in real life as male friendship!
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Jane Rizzoli and Maura Isles. A stong and beliveable friendship. Love that show. It's fun and their friendship is the core of the show. It's not a quality copshow but I watch it and I enjoy every episode.
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Rizzoli and Isles
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Liz and Maria from Roswell has always been a favourite of mine.
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I wonder, does Person of Interest pass the Bechdel test?
Root and Shaw don't talk much. On the other hand they certainly don't talk about men, much.
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thing is better than friends
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Yeah it is wrong to get rid of too many young female characters in some shows right now because the interaction on everyone would get destroyed completely. But now it has been revealed that there has been a general TV financial network collapsing incident occurring right now. So in order to fix that incident, 1.) you should reduce the young female characters from the main cast to as guest, 2.) never getting rid of them from the main cast 3.) just appraise the focus carefully on all young men, old men and old women characters only without any trouble and 4.) bring back the appraisal on all young women completely.
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Rizzoli and Isles.

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Is it trendy to make women only shows? You see the same woman's lib feminism agenda, strong woman and weak men. Look at all the chick shows on the ABC (All B itch Chick) Channel Just look at all their failure shows, no one watches. That leaves the urban poor and woman as their audience, poor pickings I would say, the audience who can't notice reverse sexism. Too many girl shows has become the fad, until the sponsors realize they are losing the male 18-45 market, the market they want the most.

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"But even though it's easy enough to name a handful of good ones, wouldn't it be nice if we didn't have to?"
We don't have to. It is only an issue if we choose to make it an issue. Let's just play it cool.
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Racism isn´t an issue unless we make it an issue. Rape isn´t an issue unless we make it an issue. Murder isn´t an issue unless we make it an issue. War isn´t an issue unless we make it an issue.
There ya go. I´ve just solved the worlds problems. Who wants to go for a drink!?
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You don't seem to understand my meaning, so I'll edit your statements to better represent myself:
"Racism on television isn´t an issue unless we make it an issue. Rape on television isn´t an issue unless we make it an issue. Murder on television isn´t an issue unless we make it an issue. War on television isn´t an issue unless we make it an issue."

And with those edited statements, you are right - none of the above are issues.
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If you think that adding "on television" to all those statements makes the whole thing okay, than you truly don't have any clue how much media influences our society and the power of visualization. And to add to that, if that's how you feel, what the hell are you doing on this site!?
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I'm on this site because I love quality television regardless of the premise.
A better question would be what the hell are you doing on this site if you have such strong views about all of the above on television? There can't be much left on television there for you with such stringent viewing requirements.
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It seems to depend on the target audience. Shows that veer younger and more female do have strong female relationships (PLL, TVD, Reign, Continuum, etc). Shows that go in the opposite direction are more rare in that department.
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I hadn't tapped into this show because of the whole baby having original show description, so thanks for this article. I have now done a catchup on it and realise that it is a comedy about female friendship. I am really enjoying it and there is always something in the show which makes me laugh out loud (particularly loved the gnome pictures!). While I really enjoyed SATC it was always the cycle of "I don't have a man, men are awful - why don't i have one" which i found a bit on the tedious side.
As you say there are not enough shows with strong female friendships with no competing for men aspects
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totally agree - Sex and the City was not really about the friendship of the girls - I mean it was but in a unrealistic way. And it was more about guys and sex.
And I dont get why everyone keeps talking about Christina and Meredith - for me they never really came across as best friends - like u said it was probably cause we didnt see much of them and when we did all they talked about was their men problems. I know Meredith said she is her soulmate and stuff but I always thought: buuullshiiit haha
Thats why Turk and JD were so good - cause they talked about everything not just Girls and Sex.
Gilmore Girls and TBBT Shows good friendships
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I had the same reaction to this show, so refreshing... after watching a couple of episodes (catching up) I got so hooked that I turned to their first attempt "best friends forever", which - sadly - only lasted for 6 episodes... let's hope this one stays around for a bit longer!
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My absolute favorite line from Gray's anatomy was said by Meredith to Derrick and she said "you're the love of my life but she's my soulmate". She was talking about Cristina, but I just love the idea that those two roles can be fulfilled by two different people.
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In Parks and Rec, I can't help but feel like the show's producers or whoever is running the show felt like Leslie didn't need Ann anymore after she got Ben. Ann was slowly edged out as Leslie and Ben's relationship got more serious. Don't get me wrong, I LOVE Leslie and Ben and their love thang but Ann and Leslie had a pretty special thing going on, too. There are probably other reasons why Rashida Jones left or was made to leave the show but I think this is a good example of how romantic or male-female relationships usually overshadow female-female relationships on TV.
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Another one is The Good Wife. Alicia and Kalinda used to be really good friends. Now they hardly ever talk. I don't even know what happened. It's all about Alicia and Will/Peter/Cary/Finn/other guys or Kalinda and Cary now. Also, I always thought that Alicia and Diane should be good friends, if not bffs.
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Kalinda slept with Peter before Alicia and Kalinda knew eachother. Kalinda didn't tell Alicia so she found out by accient. Alica felt like Kalinda stabbed her in the back by not telling her. That's why their friendship ended.
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Right! I remember now. Thanks, hegealgardsta. :) My memory ain't what it used to be.
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And in another episode (belive me or not, SatC isn´t by far one of my favourite shows, but here in Spain they put it one n,d another, and another time, so you ended remembering a lot of episodes) Carrie tried to spend more time with the girls to make stronger they friendship because it is important to their future ( at that point a thought : hurra! at least one show showns friendship as something to invest time on!) but in the end she realise that she was only "doing it because she was afraid she wasn´t to have a man in the end"....I was mad about that turn...
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Miranda said it in one of the Sex and the City episodes, that they were 4 intelilllent women and they didn´t talk about anything that it wasn´t men... and then they tried to talk about something else about two seconds and end up talking about men again... I thougght when I saw it that that was sad, but I undestood that the series was about love and relationships, but it´s true that me and my friends talk about a lot of things, and men are not the most important one... and for people like me, that don´t have a relationship, friends are OUR true love, our special ones, and so many times it´s not seen in tv
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Bo and Kensi on Lost Girl
Lily and Robin on HIMYM
Buffy and Willow on Buffy
Amy, Bernadette and Penny on TBBT
Rachel, Monica and Phoebe on Friends
Sookie and Lorelai on Gilmore Girls
Rory and Lane on Gilmore Girls
Alex and Nikita on Nikita
Lydia and Alyson on Teen Wolf
Carla and Elliot on Scrubs
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Also Lorelai and Rory from Gilmore girls, ( they always seemed to be bff's first and mother and daughter second)
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It depends on the show. However, most friendships in real life are due to circumstances, which is shown on tv. But, half of the time, a female character can call another one her best friend, and they barely spend any time together.
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Kaitlin thank you! Because of this article I watched Playing House and these two friends are adorable :)!
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I'm glad you watched it! It's a very funny show.
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They do seem to be few and far between. Rizzoli & Isles comes to mind though, probably one of the strongest female friendships on TV these days.
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Sorry to correct this, "you should reduce the young female characters as guests rather than getting rid of them".
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I thought of a bunch of shows that have strong female friendship: Winx Club, W.I.T.C.H., Strawberry Shortcake, Hannah Montana, etc. Of course I'm guessing at most of them.
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I think Game of Thones is plagued with strong female friendshipa: Lady Catelyn and Brienne just one example of it (just because Brienne didn't jump into a bear pit for Catelyn doesn't diminish what she's doing for her daughters one bit).

The Walking Dead's Carol & Lori where solid until the day Carol died, so were Michonne & Andrea'sdespite the Governor.

Not to mention, The Big Bang Theory's Amy, Penny and Bernadette one of the most solid friendships on TV.
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Thumbs up for the TBBT friendship.
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I think Gilmore Girls is a great example of strong female friendships. The major characters are a mother and daughter, and while this is the case, they're more like best friends, and somewhat close in age (teen pregnancy). Expanding on that, they each have a best friend, who are seen nearly every episode, with them, sometimes all together as one big group. More often than not their conversations are about pop culture, food, and their wacky small town -- of course, there is a fair amount of boy talk, but still.
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kate and allie was my favorite while growing up. Golden Girls too
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Christina and Meredith's relationship was the funniest thing on grey's anatomy! Pity she's no longer in the show
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BTVS Buffy and Willow's friendship was a good addition to the whole show. And it IMO felt quite real - you can tell your friend everything, but sometimes you just don't. One might be a slayer, the other a witch, one all action and kick ass, while the other a real nerd, and it still works. Cause real friendships are just like that - you're there for your friend, but it does not mean you're a goner on your own
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I don't think it's anyone's fault that there are more guy relationships . I think that maybe it's just easier to do male bonding and relationships than the reverse. Shows like Sex and the City have probably (and unfairly) made a certain view of women relationships popular in modern culture and could even in certain ways have helped even unbalance the dynamic we now get.
Shows like Rizzoli & Isles however are prime examples of female partners when it is written and done right. Unlike SATC it doesn't have outrageously feminist characters and it shows that even in a man's world, women can still bust some balls. The fact that this show is a buddy cop show as much as anything else also goes against the very male driven cop procedural.
In conclusion; good onscreen female relationships have to go beyond the sometimes shallow mutterings of Carrie Bradshaw's SATC, doesn't have to be about a kooky lawyer like Ally Mcbeal and can achieve more success if they emulate mixed sex relationships and male bonding relationships more. I.e. less men / women's talk, more humour etc.
Note; also noticed that Charmed wasn't up in the review, can only guess its because all three girls are sisters but I loved that show and I thought the relationships were great on that.
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What I find interesting is that an increase of 'bromances' on television was probably in response to series like Sex and the City and Desperate Housewives highlighting female friendships, but like you indicated Kaitlin, their friendships all seemed based on superficial things, and the writers often felt that they had to be fighting to keep the drama up and make the series good. So really, television was never really at a stage were it was producing meaningful female character friendships, it only gave the appearance it was, and ironically, people thought men were being left out which has resulted In the initial success and now over-exposure to meaningful bromances, while we're still waiting for a decent female friendship. Ironic, really.
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It´s complicated question but I guess one reason are stereotypes. Females in general aren´t consider to be very interesting - and two female friends or group of female friends are in real life usually patronized by men - "Oh, they talk only about shallow chick things, ugh, they talk about boys, makeup, feelings, period, they make sleepovers and polish their nails, nothing interesting". You know how many man don´t believe me that I talk with my female friend about politics, economy, books, movies, life and death, philosophy etc.? They say something like it´s not possible and they know that chicks talk only about stupid boring things.
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Because Playing House is written by the stars, who are actually best friends. That's why it rings true.
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I always found the women in Friends more sympathetic and easier to root for than the ladies of SATC. Monica, Rachel and Phoebe did pass the Bechdel test: they talked about their careers, families, and yes, about food a lot.
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What about the soaps? I never watched them but I would assume there's a lot of women with friendships. Although if you look at most shows today they tend to use either a male/female pairing or a group of mixed gender friends/colleagues. In fact, didn't Friends have two women who got along? And the relationships between the women on Person of Interest are complex. It may be that a show with two women can, and has, turn off male viewers and networks want as broad an audience as possible. It's just that showing two women fighting has more drama than two women getting along. But that tends to come from the soaps.

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I totally agree with you on this! I have found that lately when a strong female/female bond is portrayed on TV there a lot (or at least a few very loud) viewers that want or decree that they are lesbians automatically when they see a strong respect of friendship. I have no problem with same sex couples on TV, but I have a problem when its automatically assumed that 2 female friends are lesbians or secretly in love with each other. The characters of Regina/Emma on Once Upon A time or Jane/Maura on Rizolli and Isles have been at the center of this. It's fine to have a character come out like Peck on Rookie Blue entered into a same sex relationship and it was done well. But it doesn't fit all shows or characters and not every women who it tight with another women is a lesbian.
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I think another good example of this (& which im kind of surprised wasn't mentioned in this article) would be Xena and Gabby on Xena: Warrior Princess. For that the writers threw in a little lesbian joke in S1 which viewers stuck too and caused huge debates about the 2 characters sexuality
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Thank you! Just read through all the comments and was shocked that no one had mentioned Xena and Gabrielle. The subtext is an unfortunate part of that relationship though, I haven't watched the entire series myself but despite this I think their relationship could serve as a solid example of a good female friendship.
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I wouldn't say the subtext is an "unfortunate" part of that relationship but I kind of get what you mean. I'll just say that by the last season of the show the subtext pretty much just becomes text. But keeping that aside and even looking at early episodes you can see that it was a very strong friendship
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Yeeaahhh... Xena's like a whole different can of worms. Yes, they had a strong friendship, but by the end of the series, even the biggest deniers could see the subtext from space
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Yeah idk how you could watch S6 and not see it
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I'm just gonna leave this here.
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Lost Girl's Bo and Kensi were the best! Their relationship/ sisterhood was my absolute favorite.
I have to exclude season 4 because Bo was going through something.
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We don't talk about season 4 at all...
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How about Caroline and Max in 2 broke girls... they're good buddies.
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Because most people don't watch enough anime. Plenty of strong female friendships there. Hell, there are entire series based on them.

But seriously, I can't explain it beyond the possibility of too many men in the decision making roles.
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I dont know about friendship... But i'm still waiting to see Tatiana Maslany F--- herself... Literally...
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Lovely to see this kind of article here on tv.com
Reign is a CW show that subverts many CW female friendship tropes. The girls genuinely care for each other and never shame each other even when they don't agree with their life choices. There's also Leslie's several super supportive female relationships on Parks and Rec (*fondly remembers Galentine's day*). There's Broad City as well, and even Cougar Town.
But yes, like you said, I can't think of any show (except broad city) in which the leads are two women with the kind of relationship the 'bromance' shows have.
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Leslie and Ann forever. I think their friendship is one of the strongest, and funniest, friendships around.
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" In fact, most of them have something to do with food, needing to find food, and the next time I'll be able to eat food." My discussions with my friends are also about this. And about TV.

There's been a lot of discussion about who could be Clinton's (Hillary!) VP. A lot of people saying that the country (mind you, not my country, I'm not from the U.S. nor do I live there) cannot handle a two-women ticket. Now, don't tell my colleagues about this (I'm a political scientist), but TV is a lot like this when it comes to the pairing of two women. It seems like they're afraid that if two women take center-stage without a man, their periods will synch up and they'll start eating a lot of cake and destroy the cake supply.

Usually, when there's a duo and one is female, the other has to be male. Somehow, the concern for "balance" becomes very important, whereas it really isn't an issue when it's a man-on-man (see what I did there?) deal. This pairing is very obvious on procedurals: it is usually a male-male or male-female (in that order) pairing. To anyone wanting a little taste of something different, I always suggest Scott & Bailey, an UK show about two badass female cops who are best friends. (BTW, it is always criticized for its lack of relevant male characters).
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But what about series like Girls, Mistresses, Desperate Housewives, Sex and the City etc. that have more than two female leads?
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Girls, as the writer pointed out, has four female leads with tenuous relationships. I do watch the show, and tend to agree. I followed Desperate Housewives for a while - to me, they felt like friends of circumstance. Sex & the City, also as the writer points out, is about four women - mostly talking about men. I don't know the show Mistress.

She's hoping to discuss "strong" female friendships and, those shows don't really present that, despite a very female cast. I would also point out the extreme lack of diversity on all of those (except for the one I never heard about).
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'To anyone wanting a little taste of something different, I always suggest Scott & Bailey, an UK show about two badass female cops who are best friends. (BTW, it is always criticized for its lack of relevant male characters).' Oh the irony.
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I have never seen a show criticized for not having female leads or having them be irrelevant. Well, only by feminist reviewers.
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I just thought it was funny that a series that seems to exemplify a strong female friendship would of course be criticised for it's treatment of male characters.
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There's at least one thing wrong with that logic. The president and VP do not hang out. As such, I cannot imagine any reason their periods should sync up.
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Be sure to tell that to your party/representatives/media.
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I'm actually angry that I have to be the one to bring up Broad City. Best tv relationships of any kind ever.
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I still need to watch Broad City, but this makes me more excited to do so.
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In real life women are not really friends with other women, unless they are into other women. Most of the women I met in the last half century actually preferred the company of men. Even in comedies, most women who hang out with each other have male buddies in common.
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This sounds kinda sexist.
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My main group of friends is predominantly male, and I spend a lot of my time with them, but that doesn't mean I don't also have several really good friends who are female. It's ridiculous to think women aren't friends with one another or that they're only into women if they are. The women you know are definitely not the norm. Or they're just really bad at making friends.
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Very possibly the case. I have been thinking about it all day and even talked with some of my female friends about it and the consensus is that they don't have the time to spend with other women because they work all day and don't have the time to date or get to know men otherwise. A woman who is not married by age 24 in that society of mine is considered an old maid. Since the civil war, this limit has extended to maybe age 28 but that's the extreme limit.It's not really about being independent financially and otherwise that is at issue, but actually the judgement of other women in that "competition to be married" that is apparently terrible. You have also tot take account that we are a small population in a tiny country and the ratio between eligible partners, especially if social background is of decisive importance. is minute.
As for the lesbian comment, it is the most stupid thing I said or wrote in the last decade. But still, again from the feedback I got from my female friends, it seems that spending too much time with someone of the same gender has the social stamp of a " gay stigmata" attached to it, precisely because the "competition to be married" is so overwhelming strong. Naturally, I am opposed to such a notion, but it is what it is until the slow progress of time will change these customs.
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where do you live?!
or should I ask when? sounds like the 50s...
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No, it's today's world in most of the societies of the world. It's in the Deep South of Hart of Dixie (watch the last four episodes and all that Cruise subplot). It is in the lives of both Indian characters in respectively TBBT and Royal Pains, and the Korean girl in The Gilmore Girls. In all the latter Foreign examples, there is what I consider a racist undertone of the fact that their culture and concept of marriage is like you yourself imply antiquated and that you the Great Americans have it the best.It is there in the Chinese cultures and African cultures as well In almost all the major societies, there is that competition to be best married. It's the whole debutante culture, and we are talking of over two billion people.
I am no expert on the issue of why in these societies women don't have strong relationships with other women, which is why I talked about it to my female friends; and got the response I did.
But take Hart of Dixie and all the Belles culture.They do seem to have many girlfriends in that social club of theirs. But are they really close friends outside from the social attractions they plan.?They turned against one their own and "banished" her in the same way as the women in my and all these other societies did. Is it a good thing? Of course not. But it exists, whether antiquated or whatever you feel about it.
I am still waiting for that definitive study which demonstrates without a doubt that women who do not have the constraint to be married before their 30s and have special bonds with their gender are better off than those who do have these constraint. The answer does seem obvious; but frankly now that I have read about it and discussed it , I am not so sure.
Again, this does not involve me or my views on this issue. All my girlfriends were Dutch or Scandinavian and this is the way I comsider relationships between the genders.
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and before you yell rightfully about the "gay stigmata" it is NOTHING compared to the "divorcee stigmata". I know, I know.
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This is the stupidest thing I've heard all day.
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Lol... what? So I don´t have any female friends - I just want to sleep with them :D? And I guess they wanna sleep with me too otherwise why would they talk to me riiight? That IS so funny that I can´t even be mad at you for this ridiculous opinion. And I guess it´s the same with guys? Girls are friends with guys only because of sex of course.. so basically.. I want to sleep with anyone around me, right :D? Oh, such a typical woman!
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nope
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I...what?

So, basically, women are friends with the people of the same gender they want to sleep with?
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I know I am sounding like a douche saying that, which I don't think I am. For what it's worth, this has been my experience. Between posting the comment and now I have been trying very hard to find a woman who had woman friends that had female friends outside the family circle or boyfriend circle and have come up with nobody.I was actually surprised that none have female workplace friends, I mean people they actually see outside from work.But that does not mean that these don't exist somewhere else.
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I mean, most of my friends are female, as am I, but that goes with your theory because I'm also a lesbian. So I can't really argue, even though I disagree!
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For the Love of God.It is not my theory, it is an observation.
The title of this page asked a question and I looked around and asked the concerned and was given a reply. Full stop. My mistake is I shared this here. Good for you that you're a lesbian and that you have female friends. It happens that in most societies of the world, the higher echelons of society, to which I belong of no fault of my own, women want to get married young and they compete with each other to get the best eligible bachelors they can get.This is why you have shows like The Bachelor or Who Wants to Marry Harry or whatever.Since they are mostly working women, they feel that they don't have time to spend with other of their gender in a way to form strong bonding friendly relationships. They have of course female acquaintances with which they spend time, but not the deep commitment of what is usually called friendship. This happened all the time in Gossip, the backstabbing BFF.
This is what I have been told. Again, for the fourth freaking time, it does not reflect my beliefs, my views, or my experience with women or my gender. And it is not in any way, shape or form a theory.
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I thought Nikita did female friendship brilliantly. Granted the situation was not your normal everyday run of the mill friendship but still, Alex and Nikita's relationship was the heart of that show. Yes, they were spies, yes there was shooting and explosions and kidnapping and Russian mobsters and yes both ladies had romantic subplots throughout the series but all of that was secondary to the relationship Alex and Nikita shared.
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Ah yes. Will miss them. Sad now.
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Happy Endings had some great female friendships! Shame though we have to think of specific examples as examples!
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Strong female friendships seem to dominate more in comedy. Maybe because when women get together they say really funny things? The social mystery of what women say/do when they congregate in a washroom is always good for a laugh.

Drama on the other hand is a weak area for female bonding. TV drama needs to find a Thelma & Louise....minus the driving off the cliff part.
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Because television has come to portray all strong female relationships as a precursor to lesbianism. There are probably many reasons behind this, but it does a disservice to women and dumps fuel on the flames of chauvinism. Not to mention that it doesn't reflect real-life friendships.
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