Fringe: Time Keeps On Slippin'

This article contains spoilers from tonight's Fringe episode, "And Those We've Left Behind." If you haven't seen it yet, be smart and don't read on.


Tonight's episode of Fringe, "And Those We've Left Behind," was a Twilight Zone-ish episode, in that it blended science-fiction with philosophy and asked those impossible-to-answer questions you can spend all night answering: "Can you love a different version of the person you love? Is your love for someone built by the shared experience of your relationship, or the person?" It was old-school, and I loved it.

"And Those We've Left Behind" was a beautifully tragic "mythalone" episode, with a case that mirrored the current problems faced by Peter, Olivia, and Walter. Peter is back, and because we were too busy following shapeshifters last week, we've only now had a chance to see Peter attempt to fit in with the Fringe team from this timeline. And things did not go well. At all.

It's painful to watch Peter constantly be treated as if he just crashed a party. Walter wants nothing to do with Peter because he can't bear to deal with the man who claims to be the grown-up version of the son(s) he lost—he's reverted to a childlike state, and he has no interest in playing with the new boy in class. Olivia is cautious around Peter, just as you would be if a handsome stranger arrived out of nowhere and knew intimate details about you. I know that some Fringe fans out there would rather see the characters in their old shoes (their relationships with each other are one of Fringe's strong points), but I think this new method of reintroducing them is so cool, because it opens up all sorts of ideas that are fun to rattle around the brain.

When two people meet and form a bond or fall in love, their lives are changed forever. From the moment they meet until to the end of their lives, the life they live is entirely unique, different from the life they would have lived if they hadn't ever met each other. We've seen versions of Walter and Olivia who never had adult Peter in their lives, and while they're still recognizable, no one would dispute that they're very different from the Olivia and Walter we saw grow in Seasons 1 through 3.

Now that a man who once had such an impact on their lives has entered the mix, it's fascinatingly uncomfortable. We know, as does Peter, that he's fated to be with Olivia, but this Olivia isn't blessed with copies of the first three season of Fringe on DVD, and doesn't know what she missed. It raises the question of whether this Olivia will ever be able to love Peter the way she once did. Will fate push them together in a different way? Can they rebuild their relationship again by spending time together, as they did in another timeline? Or has the window on their relationship closed, forcing Peter to find his way back "home" to have a chance with Olivia? It's an aching examination of fate, destiny, and other terms we throw around when we meet that special someone we think we're supposed to spend the rest of our lives with. (This obviously applies to Water and Peter's relationship as well.)

While those questions as they relate to Walter, Olivia, and Peter will be answered over the course of the season, Fringe provided a quicker answer in tonight's case-of-the-week. Real-life husband and wife Stephen Root and Romy Rosemont were FANTASTIC (and they had to be to make the story work) in the emotionally charged tale of the nerdiest couple ever, an electrical engineer and a professor of theoretical physics. Engineer Raymond was fuddling around with a machine in his basement that turned the clock back to pre-Obama times, making things that happened four years ago pop up and scare the stuffing out of people. A house and a young girl reverted to their four-years-ago forms, a train popped up out of nowhere and almost crushed four teens on their way to a crappy emo concert (Aluminum Rain used to be great but they suck now), and a tunnel full of commuters slowly began turning into what it was before the last Olympics: the inside of a mountain.

Raymond didn't know he was making other people's lives hell; he thought he was creating a time bubble to set his house back by four years so his wife, Kate, could finish up some important math. It turned out that math was what made the way-back machine tick, and Raymond was giving his wife a chance to finish her work so he could perfect the machine with her numbers. Why was he doing all this? Because Kate, in the present day, is afflicted with early onset Alzheimer's and doesn't even remember who Raymond is. Raymond just wanted to spend some time with his wife when she was healthy and give her the chance to help create a way they for them to go back to the time before a terrible disease took her away. It was sad stuff, and it really packed a punch thanks to great acting and excellent plotting.

You see, we first met Raymond and Kate during one of those four-years-ago moments, when things were great (the content look on Root's face was priceless); it was only later that we saw the brilliant Kate taken from Raymond as time reset to the present. He was holding onto the past so tightly that he was willing to do anything to get it back, because his new reality was one in which the woman he loved didn't even recognize him. Does that scenario sound familiar?

I tried to put myself in both Raymond's and Peter's shoes, and it wasn't pretty. Would I try to make this "new" person love me again? Would I try to figure out a way to go back to the "old" person and revive that love? Would I crumple to the ground and scream, "Why me!?" Yes, yes, and definitely yes.

Those questions still remain, but Fringe offered one bittersweet outcome in its resolution of the Raymond and Kate story. Raymond eventually showed Kate the machine and told her what he was doing, but he didn't know that his effort to keep them together was hurting others. Kate understood the negative side effects of her work, and realized she couldn't continue with it. Raymond asked her to finish it anyway, so that he could rebuild the machine in a remote area were others wouldn't be effected, but in the end, Kate erased everything and left Raymond a note telling him that the best way for him to love her was to move on. It was so tragically heartbreaking yet so filled with love, one of those endings that sticks to the inside of your soul.

With its themes of love and loss and sweet time jumps, "And Those We've Left Behind" was Fringe's version of Lost's "The Constant," considered by many to be that series' finest. But the love story between Peter and Olivia is still very far from being over, and as the new Olivia begins to understand just how important she was to this strange man who popped out of time, I get the feeling that Peter and Olivia might avoid the same fate as Raymond and Kate if destiny can just give them a little nudge. An excellent episode of Fringe, and one that should stay with fans for some time.

Notes from the Other Side

– How awesome was it when Olivia and Peter connected at the end of the episode, when she asked him about the other version of herself and admitted that she can tell how much he cared about her from the way he looked at her when he thought she wasn't looking? Their Season 4 relationship between may be frustrating for some, but it's these big payoffs from such small things that make it so worth it. This is what I expected from the Fringe writing team when they steered the show in this direction, and they're delivering. Ditto for Walter's reluctant praise of Peter.

– It seems like the writers are still struggling to find a place for Lincoln in all this. He was the star of the season premiere, but hasn't really progressed since then. I figured the show would make him an obstacle between Peter and Olivia, but so far he's just a co-worker.

– Walter, while looking for his rubber cement: "I think it's in my Spider-Man fanny pack."


Follow TV.com writer Tim Surette on Twitter: @TimAtTVDotCom

Comments (67)
Submit
Sort: Latest | Popular
The Peter-Olivia "romance" is the weakest and most emotional part of Fringe. I sincerely hope the writers won't gloss over the obstacles of their relationship. And of course the first time Peter develped stronger feelings was when he was with Fauxlivia who is of course much livlier and more interesting. Like Olivia once said. "She's everything I'm not"



Unfortunately one can be sure that the writers will pander to the american TV-viewers sappy taste and go for simple romance. Especially if the show continues to rate poorly.
Reply
Flag
Really awesome episode. Everything tied in together, and it was wonderful to finally get to see Peter try to be 'one of the guys' again. I really like how Walter and Peter's relationship is going, Walter is COMPLETELY different without having known his son. He's a leaning a little more towards the 'Mad Hatter' in him and interesting. What keeps me laughing is how rude he is to and concerning Peter! And Peter just lets it roll right off his shoulder. I think with time Peter will wear Walter down and they will become close again.



Reply
Flag
As much as captivating this episode was i couldn't muster any joy out of it as it also was the lowest rated and watched episode of the series closing it further for cancellation. Therefore, at this point it just feels like why even watch it. Of course, as addicted i am to the show now i can't turn away but i wish i could. It is a torture watching these great stories and they can't even have a proper ending.
Reply
Flag
Great episode.

But I have to say, I really miss the alternate universe with kickass Lincoln, and social Olivia.

Anyone else feel the same way? (and aren't they supposed to be helping each other to repair the two universes?)
Reply
Flag
I really hope they don't use Lincoln as an obstacle for Peter and Olivia. Those two crazy kids have enough obstacles, what with the alternate time lines and all.



My question is, when does Astrid get a little romance?? I think Lincoln and Astrid would be a really nice coupling.



Great episode!! I really like your reviews, Tim. You get the meat of the matter. :)
Reply
Flag
"And Those We've Left Behind" was Fringe's version of Lost's "The Constant," considered by many to be that series' finest"



yes I remember that episode !! :)
Reply
Flag
My greatest complaint about this episode is the conveniences that were arranged. Like the lack of a even remotely plausible cientific explanation for the event, or the convenient tunnel time bubble jam.



That being said, i'm a huge sucker for this season. I was never a big Peter fan and it always pained me a bit the absence of chemistry between him and Olivia (That was my complaint about season 3). But now I can't help but love the character interactions which seem so real. As fond as I was of the relationships from the first seasons, I can help but feel refreshed by what the writers are doing right now, which is giving the viewers major perspective without giving much away at a single time. Building up THESE characters and these new interactions with old Pete, who is doing a hell of a job out of a job straight from hell: He has to convince this world what he is capable of; deal with his former employer, girlfriend, and father who didn't acknowledge his existence in the first place. What would you do in his shoes?
Reply
Flag
No chemistry between Peter & Olivia?! They have been developing that chemistry since the conclusion of the John Scott storyline. Those two have amazing chemistry, beautiful, earnest and aching like a Jane Austin romance, long gazes, heartfelt conversations, sweet and small and slow.



Modern tele has inured us to the gratuitous and obvious main character love story wherein the obstacles to their connection are merely cheap tricks to lather the shippers and drag out the tension but the outcome is a foregone conclusion (see http://tvtropes.org for a great resource on this and every other tool in their case). Peter and Olivia built their connection through shared experience and gradual trust, and laid a foundation that was strong enough to weather a terrible trauma and betrayal. Their connection is so powerful, Peter appeared to the amber universe Olivia in her dreams and she was compelled to use her cortexiphan skills to manifest him into her world from wherever he was lost in time, despite his never existing in this universe. Those two have more chemistry than Heisenberg's notebook, man.
Reply
Flag
I felt I was going to break someone's animosity with that comment. Sorry about that, it's my personal opinion and I stand by it. I'll, at least, try to explain it.



You have the right on most everything you said, and I second it. The writers did everything correctly. The set-up, the build-up... But when it happened it felt forced. At least I did. You can take a horse to the water but you can't make it drink. It can be a great stallion and very tasty water but still... I love Anna and her work and I never disliked Joshua's (and I'm taking a greater fancy in this season) but I have yet to see a meaningful click between them.



The best scene for me ever between these two was in the cafe, when Peter told Olivia what happened between him and Fauxlivia. Torv shined brightly there. After they made up she always felt a bit out of character. Even out of sync. There was no romantic depth whatsoever.



Blame 'Liv perhaps, whose romanticism levels with that of a shepherd's pie... I dunno. After a few episodes it had grown to a finale where we were left with "Peter must choose one Olive and the other world would be destroyed". It didn't happen but it was a hell of a pill for a viewer to swallow at once back then.



Excuse me if i'm struggling a bit to explain myself. Sometimes it's hard to write stuff directly from gut feelings rather than facts. The bottom line is it had everything to work, was written to work and was building up nice and slowly, but then it all got rushed with the smoothness of an elephant herd. Didn't buy it.



cheers!
More +
Reply
Flag
Please, no need to apologize; I appreciate that everyone has their own perspective. My rebuttal was certainly not meant to be delivered with animosity; I wanted to offer a differential point of view. I hope my impassioned response did not come across as threatening.



For me, Olivia's reticence and awkwardness, her struggle to make and sustain connections and intimacy, her compartmentalism, and Peter's patience and steadfastness throughout all her issues, this was one of the best, albeit subtle, plot arcs of the last couple seasons. These two have the love of the imperfect, the romance of dark and twisty souls, AND they are seemingly star-crossed. It is Jane Austin meets Shakespeare meets the Outer Limits.



I will agree that elements of this romance were over- and under-played and the believability of the dynamic has suffered. Peter is seemingly so well-adjusted it is nearly unbelievable, no catastrophe rattles this man, he is cool as a cucumber staring into the abyss at the edge of the world, and he has been allowing his feelings for Olivia to develop since S01 so he is utterly unflappable in his commitment, but Olivia has had so much to overcome within her internal landscape, perhaps because of her compartmentalism she just carries all her traumas around like ghosts haunting her. Try to recall how many blow we have seen Olivia receive in the 3 years we came to know her: John Scott's betrayal, the cortexiphan trials, losing Charlie, facing her mother's death and her step-father's abuse, the Fauxlivia debacle (not an exhaustive list). This is not a woman for whom love or even basic intimacies come easily. One of the most striking differences in Amber Olivia is her relationship with Astrid: the scene in which they are discussing Lincoln as a possible love interest for Olivia - Blue Olivia never would have had such an exchange with a colleague, perhaps not even with her sister; she is too self-contained. This internal struggle is not always so evident nor easily communicated to an audience but I believe Torv has done a great job of portraying a woman who has been dealt too many blows too early in life and yet still reaches, however cautiously, for the beautiful, shiny thing before her, despite being hurt repeatedly in the past. When I look back at Olivia and Peter "together" I see a woman trying to find her way in unfamiliar territory, cautious and uncertain, and a man, patient and earnest, willing to go more than half-way to bridge the distance. With his quirky father flipping flapjacks in the buff to add a little more awkwardness.



To me, if any of their story felt unnatural or artificial, it was the protracted betrayal: Olivia was kidnapped, taken to another universe, had her brain experimented on, was brainwashed, implanted into another woman's life, and then nearly murdered in the name of science, but no big deal that trauma, what she cannot accept is that Peter was deceived by Fauxlivia and he did not realize the deceit. Like most women I want to believe I am utterly unique and irreplaceable to the man I love, but SHE didn't even realize she had been swapped into some other woman's life, and Peter did figure it out, yet this angsty for the sake of angst issue was dragged out. Olivia getting over it and moving on with her relationship with Peter did feel rushed, but not, IMO, because they lack chemistry but because the writers kicked that horse too long.
More +
Reply
Flag
Heisenberg's chemistry was actually hot at times. These two have the magnetism of tennis balls.
Reply
Flag
Very emotional episode. The best line for me is when Olivia talks about her dream to Peter : "You're a stranger. What would I feel ?". That's pretty harsh considering how the opening scene shows how much he loves her.



I always thought that, despite the new color credits, what we were seeing in this season four wasn't a new universe but the good old blue one in which Peter had been erased. Now that Peter did say clearly that those people were not his loved ones, it seems to tend towards the fact that this is a new universe. Well, then why make him disappear in the first place... and why make him hang around in a blue-ish thing and why make him come back to this new universe if the blue one still exists ? I'm still not convinced because I interpreted "the day we died" like that : the machine made hiim disappear from his own universe, the blue one. He got out of the machine and then disappeared into thin air. Therefore what we are watching is still the blue universe. Is someone with me on that matter ?



If those character-centered episodes are very good, I'm still looking forward to know more about all the others aspects of the fringe mythologie. One week to wait... damn !



PS : I rewatched every s4 ep. About the opening credits things that a fellow commentator talked about and the black thing spreading : I think it's just a screen or video problem. On my version, last week episode has the whole screen darker... leading to the impression that the black frame is bigger than on the other eps. So nothing relevant here imo.
More+
Reply
Flag
I second your opinion. The only place Peter's essence could remain (barring all the possible otherworldly explanations the writers can make up of course) is the same world he disappeared from. Hints to that were given in this season's second episode, near the end by Walter when he explained "some people can leave an indelible mark on our subconscious".



So I'd reckon it's not even a different timeline (since then Peter wouldn't even exist to leave that print), but a rearranged one, by Peter itself and the machine. I figure the only way to restore it is using the machine again?



I guess the reason this universe is amber or yellow might just be a nerdy Pokemon reference (Red + Blue? please don't make me explain. The subcontext is all there) since the major difference is both worlds are now entwined so it could not be red and blue anymore.
Reply
Flag
So far this has been the best episode of the season..

Every scene with Peter makes me cry a little, he looks sad and lost. Seriously,am conflicted,though i love the freshness of this season (the new relations/interactions, the idea that Peter's return means some physics theories are now practical), but what Peter (the character) is going through is almost unbearable n painful



"the subject" is so moving ya'll
Reply
Flag
Tied for the best episode of the season.
Reply
Flag
Fringe is back in track with this episode... the best episodes of this season (so far)
Reply
Flag
This was a wonderful episode, very interesting and emotionally charged.
Reply
Flag
Walter on the Spiderman Fanny Pack is one of the funniest lines in Fringe yet. Fabulous episode. Everyone knows a show is ruined when the characters who've been on the verging of getting it on, get it on - the writers have found yet another creative way to keep Peter and Olivia in the "almost but not quite" zone.
Reply
Flag
Fantastic episode, I like season four very much!
Reply
Flag
Quick Question: The house in the end was closed for years (20 years I tihnk) as Walter was in an institution and judging from the covers and dust... so how come there was a flat screen LCD TV?
Reply
Flag
In the Amber universe LCD televisions were first introduced to the consumer market in 1987.
Reply
Flag
I noticed that too and was what???
Reply
Flag
This was an outstanding episode, though I don't understand why no-one has mentioned the observers again. This is basically all their fault, and Peter seemed to understand this, but then didn't take the time to explain to Olivia, Broyles etc. who they actually are.
Reply
Flag
For a while I was kind of worried that they would take the cheap, easy way out, and rush to get everything back to normal. Despite some fear when Peter came back 4 episodes into the season, I've been extremely pleased with the way they've handled it. I find it easy to care for these characters, partly because I can see some of the old characters in them, but I think they've been given enough depth to stand on their own. I also think the writing has hit its peak. The mixture of the stand-alone stories and mythology elements has never been handled as well, and as consistently as this season. I do feel like they have been under-using the parallel universe and the Observers, but considering how much I love this season, I can't say I really missed them too much. So, for now, there's only one thing that concerns me. I'm worried about, whenever they do bring back the original timeline (because we should all know they will), how it will be handled. I have faith that they'll be able to do it in a way so that what we're seeing now doesn't become obsolete and a waste of time. But we can't really know that until we see it. I'd hate to see this storyline cheapened like that. And, of course, I'd hate to see it cancelled without them being able to plan a proper ending, but unless that happens, I'll just sit back and enjoy the amazing ride they're taking us on.
More+
Reply
Flag
"Isn't anyone else bothered by the fact that Peter just accepts this timeline as his even though it's as different for him as the other universe? I mean, if Peter wants to plant himself here and acclimate to everyone around him and vice-versa, he might as well just go back to his original universe with Fauxlivia. The one here is really now Fauxlivia 0.5."



That's what i was going to say, but Fringe went handled it beautifully at the end. This is my favorite episode in quite a while, but the next time they make a Faraday Cage, hopefully it'll include a helmet. The question now is when Peter gets his timeline back, will it be with everyone remembering both timelines, or will it overwrite the current timeline? It determines how much time we're currently wasting.



As someone who's calmly watched Fringe since the first episode, I don't care abut Peter and Olivia getting back on track, nor do I care about their epic love story. It's Olivia; she's as exciting as broccoli mold. As long as Walter's Walter, I'm okay.



I like the actual Fringe element. I like the filler episodes. Besides, once they left the season one cliffhanger in the other universe and brought us back with absolutely nothing but their first amnesia arc, I'm not surprised that they're not really getting to a big picture yet.
More+
Reply
Flag
I'm torn. On the one hand, I'm enjoying the episodes this season. On the other hand, I hate the direction. They were at a GREAT point at the end of Season 3, and we still had a lot of ground to cover.. the two universes working together, telling the story about The First People, the origins of the machine, the Observers, etc. ...but instead, it feels like we're wasting time on this alternate reality, and I'm just waiting for them to hurry up and put it back, and stop wasting our time with it. It feels like all of the Flash-sideways stuff from Lost's final season - it was a good end to the story, but they could have spent the majority of that time rewarding the viewers with answers to their questions rather than a big What If? scenario. -sigh- (And yet.. I'll keep watching, haha)
Reply
Flag
As in life, great TV happens in between making plans.
Reply
Flag
Still no story arc, no progress, unrelated main characters, only filler episodes. I'm one of the few who don't like season 4 at all.
Reply
Flag
The love story was so powerful. I want to see more of the observers and what they think of Peter and the timeline. To bad show will be going into hiatus till January.

Am glad the Peter Olivia love story is on hold.
Reply
Flag
As first I must say that for me was the first decent episode of Fringe this season, but I'm still disappointed by the simple fact that the story does not go forward, it seems that everything has stopped. ok there was the dream and Peter back in the lab, but other than that? I think it is becoming a little too Lost and a little less Fringe. For example: when they started to insert elements of Lost in Terra Nova I think the show has improved, but I think inserting elements of Lost in Fringe.... you can't improve a show that was almost perfect.



I hope Fringe continues its own way
Reply
Flag
Great episode, In the first episodes of this season i was missing the old characters. I didn'nt recognize this new Peter, Olivia and Walter and i wasn't like it. But now i'm starting to think that this plot could be really great... the " can i love another version of the person" thing and also the " how i would be if i never met you" are very interesting. I hope that in the end of the season we get back to the 'right' timeline though,
Reply
Flag
I couldn't agree more: this was Fringe's "The Constant".



Absolutely flawless from beginning to end and a most heartbreaking tale of starcrossed lovers I've seen since The Notebook.
Reply
Flag
Stephen Root and Romy Rosemont were absolutely amazing in this episode. I usually don't get caught up in the case of the week, but this was great. And how does John Noble not have a closet full of emmys already?
Reply
Flag
This was one of the best episodes of the entire show so far IMO. Stephen Root and his real life wife were excellent in their roles - the time stuff was great - as was John Noble playing such an unhinged Walter these days. Can't praise this ep enough - 10/10.
Reply
Flag
First thing I want to comment on: the new "SPOILER" bar at the top of the page-lol.

And yes this was a fantastic episode. I love Fringe so much. And I respect the writers for being so much bolder than really any other writers on television. It was heartbreaking, as a lot of time-related tv seems to be, and just another example of why this show should be nominated for a whole slew of Emmys. I feel so bad for Peter right now...

From what the actor who plays Lincoln said, it seems like he and Peter will becomes bros. Fringe isn't the type of show that does cliche: it's idea of a "third wheel" is when your doppleganger from another universe kidnaps you, pretends to be you, and gets knocked up by your boyfriend. So I think Lincoln will just be part of the team-like Charlie was. He just needs to get his niche, which he will.
Reply
Flag
Last season I was starting to lose interest in Fringe. I found the season arc to be a bit too complex to understand with the limited amount of information they offered up. This season has easily pulled be back in. I have a rough list of the TV shows I want to see more than the others. Fringe is back in the top 5 of that list.

This was a fantastic episode, I'm loving the interaction between the main three, but I agree Lincoln could be better utilised. This season just keeps getting better. I still think that Astrid is long over due for her own episode though.
Reply
Flag
I'm actually thrilled Lincoln isn't going to be the (not yet anyway) so so overly done 3rd wheel clich.

It's soapy and it's been done to death and zombified and re-killed. Give Lincoln something else to make an impact on the show by all means. But more sci fi, less soap - thanks :)
Reply
Flag
And here I was for the longest time thinking that season 2's "White Tulip" with the time jumping man trying to save his wife giving Walter the okay to tell his son was Fringe's version of "The Constant". This just prove me wrong, because this episode was INTENSE. So great, on EVERY level. Writing, acting (!!!!!!!), even special effects and music added to this episode. No words for Stephen Root and Romy Rosemont (by the way, they're married in real life, yet that does not diminish this feat). This episode just goes to show how blessed this show is in terms of cast AND crew.



-Olivia/Peter this episode were amazing. Great writing and acting as Peter tries to find her and she discovers him. I'm hoping that she was lying to him about the dreams and that hers were the exact same as the one it revealed to us at the beginning of the episode that he was just having. Please, I love their love too much.

-I'm hoping that that's going to come up in the next couple of episodes as Olivia goes to Lincoln as a sort of knee-jerk rebellion against the dreams/memories/whatever-the-hell-they-are that she has of Peter as well as the longing looks he gives her. I just hope they don't let it go too far, because that will make me sad.

-Walter wins the comedy moment of the episode. That's right, not only does he have a Spider-Man fanny pack, but he uses it for important stuff. Like rubber cement. Everyone needs a little rubber cement from time to time.



Also, I'd like to see more interaction with the peeps from the other side.
More+
Reply
Flag
Thank you for bringing that episode up. It's another amazing Fringe episode-one of my favorites, actually.

I really like how although on paper the plots are similar (man goes back in time to be with wife), in fact each plot has specific resonance with what the main characters are going through. And that's what makes Fringe so great.

"White Tulip" had a man whose wife was killed and he needed to get her back, reflecting Walter's crossing into the other universe; "And Those We've Left Behind" is about a man whose wife, while technically still alive, is no longer the same person-their shared experiences are gone, obviously reflecting Peter coming back to find a different Olivia and Walter from the ones he knew and loved. Similar, but distinct.

Both are heartbreakingly sad and beautifully crafted, as is a lot of Fringe. I truly believe that Fringe is the best show on television right now. John Noble was robbed of an Emmy nomination, as were the writers and directors of the show.
Reply
Flag
good episode, fringe is the show i always look forward to

its kinda a revanche for lost's cop out ending
Reply
Flag
boring
Reply
Flag
Yes, your post is quite boring.
Reply
Flag
Good stuff as usual Timmy! Honestly, I didn't realize how depressing it would be to see Peter treated this way by Walter and Olivia. We all watched their relationships grow into something really special over the course of 3 long seasons... And now, *poof* it's gone. and only WE (the viewers) and Peter know it was ever there. (So someone get Olivia those dvd's stat!!!)



As far as Walter and Peter go, it's sort of a reversal from Season 1: where Walter was trying to win Peter over, and Peter was very hesitant (to say the least). Parallel- type situations, for obviously much different reasons.



With Peter and Olivia, their love grew slowly, but when they finally got there, that bitch Fauxlivia messed it all up with her vagenda.... and then just when they were on the mend: doomsday! Now it's 'this.' Whatever 'this' actually is....



Peter= poor feller
Reply
Flag
It's important to note that Peter and Fauxlivia fell in love with each other when she pretended to be our Olivia.
Reply
Flag
I don't think that they "fell in love"...

He thought she was Olivia and Fauxlivia played along. They deceptively continued what was already there.
Reply
Flag
Although one could argue that Fauxlivia did start to have feelings for Peter in the end.
Reply
Flag
This episode was beautiful!

Stellar performances from everyone.

I love Fringe. After episodes like this, it makes me tear up to think of our ratings :(
Reply
Flag
Agreed. One of the better episodes of Fringe this season.. And very touching with the couple..
Reply
Flag
Brilliant, touching and heartfelt episode, reached so many levels. I love this show so much that it breaks my heart the ratings are so bad. One thing that excels on the show besides the sci-fi aspect is the characters, they don't feel like characters but real people. The interaction and tensions between them is amazing to witness. Kate and Raymond were brilliant, yes I even got verklempt. :)
Reply
Flag
Chalk it up to either great writing or watching the episode after working the night shift, because I thought the Raymond and Kate storyline was great, I loved the scenes between Olivia, Peter and Walter, but it never dawned on me how interconnected the stories truly were to each other. Until I read this article, that is, and had the dots connected for me. Seeing Peter trying to go on business as usual, while everyone else around him is suspicious of his existence, is frustrating and intriguing at the same time as a viewer who knows how the puzzle pieces fit together. Next week's episode looks exciting but since it's the mid-season finale, it's like a mixed bag of awesome and sad.
Reply
Flag
I cannot believe you have to post a spoiler disclaimer for the stupid people. How sad.
Reply
Flag
Staff
Hey emmiegirl, thanks for your comment. The reason we made a point to put a spoiler alert in this story is that, when we posted it, the episode had only aired on the East Coast. Our general rule is that once something has aired on TV it's fair game to discuss freely, though we do realize that DVR viewers and folks outside the U.S. may not be watching right away... that's why we make a point of not posting obvious spoilers in headlines. In this case, since the episode hadn't yet aired on the West Coast, it seemed appropriate to include a note.
Reply
Flag
Thank you for the explanation, that seems incredibly reasonable. I did not realize the WC had not yet aired. My comment seems very snarky now, apologies.



(I made the comment in frustration because several of Price's reviews have had a tussle in comments with people complaining bitterly and offensively the review contained spoilers, which have gone quite heated and unfriendly. That sort of vitriol derails the conversation and conjecture fans engage in and share ideas about the show, characters and the plot direction (this Fringe group comes up with some awesome theories, very switched on here) and I have been pretty turned off of reading through comments on some reviews because of it. I thought the disclaimer was a preemptive strike to save these people from themselves.)
Reply
Flag
An amazing episode! I always loved how subtle Fringe can be! Thinking back to 6B, just last season, the parallel between the case-of-the-week and the characters' situations is not so heavy-handed and just beautifully done! They've gone full-on impressionist and I love it!



The best part for me was Peter and Olivia's last conversation where they talk about his Olivia like she actually exists somewhere and I realized of course she does! Cause Fringe taught us the lesson in season 3 and I'm not sure Peter can unlearn it: his Olivia is unique. Can't wait to see where we go from here.
Reply
Flag
Wow, great episode. Those time jumps had me going big time! Seeing Peter not being remembered by Wlater was hard to take, but the way Fringe is handling it right now makes perfect sense. If I were in Walter's shoes, I'd most likely react the same way.
Reply
Flag
Lol, awesome episode....my favorite part is when peter says we need a feredeh cage, olivia tries to relay it and walter goes off on olivia :)
Reply
Flag
That was "Faraday cage" (nothing to do with the guy on Lost) and what he was wearing was no Faraday cage... but hey, that is science *fiction* so it doesn't really matter I guess. :)
Reply
Flag
Fun fact: Faraday from Lost was named after Michael Faraday. The very same man referred to in this episode (The Faraday Cage).
Reply
Flag
glad U said it... I knew that
Reply
Flag
What a superb write-up, Tim. Does season 4 have any new writers on board? I have noticed that in this season there are nuances here and there that strike the same chords as Lost did. Whether it is the change in musical orchestration, the film direction, the dialogue, or the themes I can not say for sure, but I can't help but get the feeling that echoes of Lost seem to bleed through into Fringe in season 4. It is because of this that this show is truly reaching greatness, peaking as did Lost with its "The Constant." Yet Lost seemed to waiver when its story went from what it was at first, character driven episodic stories, to what it became in season 5, a heavy plot mish-mash with little concern for character developmental stories. But with Fringe it seems like the exact opposite is happening. Things are going just a little slower; no longer is the show centered around the two universes, or the observers, or the machine; now its truly about the characters, with each episode having its own theme and symbolism as did Lost in its first three or four seasons. Over the past few weeks I have been getting that feeling again, one that has not surfaced since quite possibly I had watched "The Constant," a feeling that I am experiencing something epic, a thing that everyone should experience for themselves, a thing that is worth remembering and sharing, and a thing that I will sit my future kids down to watch. This is among the best that television has the potential to offer, and I am truly happy that I have had the chance to watch and discuss it with people at water cooler and the people on this site.
More+
Reply
Flag
OMFG. Best episode yet of this season! I LOVED IT! But I hope Peter is able to return home soon. I miss Peter/Walter and Peter/Olivia of the original timeline, but this story has certainly been interesting!



I really hope TPTB don't try to do a Peter/Olivia/Lincoln love triangle, but I have a bad feeling they will. After all, "new" Olivia isn't really "our" Olivia and it's clear Peter has only ever loved one Olivia, and its ours. Kind of beautifully tragic, in a way, because they're always being separated. But I think even seeing "new" Olivia with Lincoln will create feelings of jealousy and longing on Peter's part, poor guy.



My favorite part of the whole episode is probably the dream sequence- Polivia's "perfect day" *happysighs*- but I also adored the part with Raymond and Kate in the basement. Guh. Fringe, you make me cry way too much, you perfect show you.



Next week looks good, can't wait to see what Olivia's migraines are all about, but ugh I hate baseball for pushing the real fall finale back XD
Reply
Flag
....this is early.....guess you have plan this weekend or none at all.....



either way, i feel bad for peter, he seem to accept the fact that he is in the wrong place, and somehow i get the feeling that the storyarc of this season would be finding a way for peter to return to his own timeline, however, to learned that you are the cause to everything that been happening in both blue and red verse, i don't even think I would want to return back to that timeline at all....
Reply
Flag
Does anyone else find it a little suspect that Walters old faculty housing is covered in cob webs and dust and yet there is a brand new LCD TV sitting in the corner?
Reply
Flag
No.

The TV was covered with a cloth too and there were LCD TVs 10 years ago.
Reply
Flag
Indeed LCD's did exist 10 years ago, but they weren't that thin. I'm also fairly certain that no individual outside of Walter lived in the house and seeing how he was in an asylum since 1991, it stands to reason the prop department screwed up.
Reply
Flag
I wondered as well. Maybe it became a frat house !
Reply
Flag

Like TV.com on Facebook