James Franco's Roast of Comedy Central: Genius Unscathed?

If you watch the early roasts of then '60s and '70s, you’ll see a table of ribald besties letting the cameras film what they’d most likely be doing anyway: sitting around drinking and taking the piss out of each other. And, because it was the '60s and '70s, they did so with fairly gentle language


If you watch roasts of the last 15 years as produced by Comedy Central, you’ll see the transformation of tone that occurred as Comedy Central opened the roast format to any notorious B-level celebrity who needed a mortgage check that month and agreed to grin and bear it while a stable of Comedy Central’s hired guns lobbed low fruits at the public disgraces of the target’s life.


James Franco’s Labor Day roast was already remarkable because the target of the evening was an A-list celebrity with a great deal of connections and cultural capital, doing the roast presumably for a sense of whimsy. So we had a couple of first-timers and a higher caliber of comedians who probably had a manager telling them any chance to get on a stage with James Franco was a chance they should take. Franco himself reminds me of conceptual artist Nikki Lee and the series of photography projects she did where she infiltrated herself into very tight cliques at every level of society by dressing and acting according to their maxims for months on end. Her work was a comment on social boundaries and (presumably) an endurance run of personal alienation...


...and similarly, Franco seems determined to live the life of not just the A List but of every level of entertainer, from artist to soap star. Clearly, in his mind, doing the roast was slumming it with (and for) the dregs of that world. (He basically described the audience as a bunch of teenage stoners on Twitter.)


The tragedy of the night was that Jonah Hill went up fairly early and his set was a perfect storm of terror, defensiveness, and never having had to tell his own jokes in public. Maybe he felt that, because of his public weight-loss struggles, he had a target on his back, but Hill fired some unnecessarily dirty blows, shaming the lovable Bill Hader for leaving SNL for “T-Mobile commercials” and incomprehensibly dressing down Andy Samberg for “returning to TV” (the shame!). It was clear Hill was aiming for maximum hurt, not merely going off of career material he’d looked up online for reference, when he took aim at Sarah Silverman and his jokes moved from the topic of career success to needling stereotypically female psychic wounds: her age and assumed infertility. In every case (except of course, James Franco's) Hill showed a level of petty, personal cruelty sharpened by his own sheer terror.


The viciousness of Jonah Hill, I would argue, upped the ante for a lot of the comics: They could and did seek emotional justice by singling Hill out later in their performances with suitably merciless barbs. Only two of the partcipants really rose above the level of terrified back-biting: Hader, who handled the fracas by assuming an alternate persona—an old man in a tracksuit representing Hollywood—and keeping things fairly gentle. And Samberg, who notably had the most graceful routine of the night, pulling a Norm MacDonald and roasting the concept of roasts itself by essentially giving everyone compliments.

However, all of the stage was guilty of a TORRENT of gay jokes such as I have not heard on primetime TV since... well, since never. Not to mention that Aziz Ansari (who, as Samberg pointed out, is actually from South Carolina) was targeted again and again for being “Indian” (Franco himself compared him to a monkey in a bell boy suit). I understand the bleeding edge of comedy and that the more things we are not "allowed" to joke about, the "funnier" they get, but what are we, really, to make of a bunch of privileged millionaires simply describing gay sex, with no discernible punchline, and to laugh as that's passed off as comedy? Or millionaires merely throwing off racist remarks and standing back to wait for applause? I know hateful jokes at roasts are a beloved tradition, but then again, so is female circumcision. (Top-hat cymbal brush, laughs!)


This might perhaps be what Franco was asking us to consider, as he ultimately delivered the cruelest rebuttal when he dismissed the roast as his latest art piece and described all the comics who had written their material, gotten dressed up, and would later pose for obligatory pictures with him as “untalented, malformed” freaks. It takes a monumental amount of privilege to “ironically” get a cable network to build and finance a Labor Day special around you, and to set all that up to ultimately make fun of it only emphasizes a god-like power over your industry. It's sort of on a par with going down to a strip club in the middle of the day and yelling at the dancers for being slutty. While I have to thank Franco for opening my eyes to how outdated and ultimately depressing this format is, I wonder if the psychic collateral damage was worth it. 

If Franco honestly wants us to judge this as an art piece, I’d say he succeeded in conjuring up problematic associations and visceral disgust in the viewer, and making a relevant comment on this form as a pressure tap in a hyper-materialist industry that simultaneously makes it a virtue to be non-judgmental: The almost surgical dissection by the most “successful” guy onstage of the other entertainers careers, the hateful “othering” potshots at two of the most traditionally targeted groups, gays and minorities, by everyone involved—it all makes me want to turn off my TV and move somewhere where the two main industries are publishing books and brewing beer. So thanks for the catharsis, genius, but ultimately Franco gave Comedy Central the ratings they wanted, the Twitter chatter they desired, and got a bunch of young viewers who normally don’t watch roasts to tune in and hear a bunch of hateful bigoted and homophobic messages being condoned as comedy. So tell me, genius, are you slaying or are you feeding the dragon?


QUESTIONS:

... Is the roast format all in good fun, refreshingly real, or deeply depressing?

... Will all the comedians involved with the roast enjoy a jump in fans/ratings/Twitter relevancy, or just the meanest ones?

... Is James Franco a legit genius or a guy who needs to hear the word “no” more often?

... Was Jonah Hill scared out of his mind, or what? Why did he go so hard to the hole with Sarah Silverman?

... Do you think anyone wept after the show?

... Are you more or less likely to watch roasts in the future, after having seen this one?

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This was a good roast. Imo, they could have gone a little harder on Franco instead of each other but it was all fun. Hader was the best in his stupid red tracksuit and Samberg was ridiculous as well with his nonsense.
This is a bad review. Clearly the author doesn't approve of roasts in the first place. Of course is going to be vicious and mean. Roger and Hill and co are specialists in gay/minority jokes. Of course they're not going to be PC
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Not only do I approve of roasts, I've roasted others. I've also done stand up in some of the dirtiest rooms in LA and the number of rape/gay/minority jokes I've heard would fill a set of Encyclopedia Britannicas.
There's a difference between telling a well crafted joke and standing up, knowing you are the only person on the dais with an Oscar nomination (aside from Franco), and belittling someone for only booking T-Mobile commercials.
Consider where us peasants who work 9-5 jobs stand in Mr.Hill's estimation, if he has so much contempt for someone who is merely "returning to tv"?
PS being a specialist in gay/minority jokes is not something to brag about.
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Look I'm completely against calling you out personally I don't think it's called for but I just can't support your analysis on this. Bill Hader makes a lot of money.... A lot! It was a joke that T Mobile is sort of like the B or even C team of mobile companies and it was funny that Hader was pimping them out. Hader had genuine laugher to this joke and you could tell he thought it was brilliant. If anything this joke was one of the least offensive of the night so I'm not too sure why your harping on this particular one. The TV joke has been a staple for a while in Hollywood in that if you return to TV you're a failure. Obviously everyone now knows this to not be true but it is still a joke that is always funny just like a joke about stoners liking Funyuns and Cheetos.

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I find this discussion extremely intriguing and must admit I am torn. While I agree with many of the comments below - that comedy (especially roasts) should be left as just that and not over-analyzed - I also feel that stand-up comedy is one of the few, unchecked forums of racism, homophobia, and bullying existing in our culture today.

Some of the comments below bewilder me. One person argues that just because such jokes/comments are made, this kind of action doesn't necessarily equate with hate/racism/what have you. To the individuals who support this view, I must ask, "By what other standards do we judge racist/homophobic behavior?" Is one still not racist when he supports minority movements but then makes fun of those exact stereotypes he is supposedly trying to counteract with his "support?" Is an act of racism (whether verbal or physical) now to be taken into context of the person's entire life and belief system?

I cannot help but draw a similarity to the recent remarks and fallouts that have occurred on Big Brother. Pertaining to one contestant's racist remarks in particular, if she had said what she did on stage as part of a stand-up comedic routine, I wonder if she would be facing the same scrutiny? I would be willing to bet it is unlikely. For whatever reasons, racism, bullying, and homophobia masquerading as "comedy" or "joking," has been going unchecked for several years now.
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Well said, Chad. There's an amazing WTF Marc Marun podcast where he takes Gallagher to task about racist jokes and how they are indefensible as being "just jokes". The fact is laughing as a crowd is both a form of bonding and a form of social voting. Stand up is a form of discussion and the audience decides how far the boundary can go when they react to comedy in a social setting- that's why people like going out to comedy shows.
I'm not trying to tell anyone what they can joke or laugh about. There's freedom of speech in this country and last time I checked it covers stand up. However we as the audience have the corresponding freedom to call people out when, instead of taking the time and effort to be funny, they just point out easy targets and outsiders, stand on their own privilege, and laugh. "Aziz has a different ethnicity ! BWAHAHAHAHA." "He has gay sex! BWAHAHAHA!" When you analyze what makes those statements laughable its not really funny, is it?
And personally, I thought Jonah Hill acted out of fear, not skill, and that's never a good place to write or speak from.
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Agreed. Thanks for this article. It has shed some thoughtful and provocative critical inquiry onto what really can be great social forums (i.e: stand up comedy) when used with responsibility and respect.
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hmmm after reading the article i didn't feel like watching the roast, but after reading the comments now i'm interested... raunchy comedy isn't really my thing but i like a lot of the roasters....
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There is a lot of good material along with the bad and its certainly thought provoking. I'd cherry pick your fave performers/ FF DVR it.
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Wow Lilly, it's a comedy show, and it was hilarious, take it for what it is. Hurtful jokes are the entire point. Why else would we bother watching?... Kroll was a disappointment for me, and his set seemed to be the shortest of all. Andy surprised the hell out of me and was by far my favourite. It was the only portion where I literally laughed out loud and did so several times. Jeff Ross' 127 hours joke about Franco's Grandmother was also hilarious, and pretty darn cruel, but THATS WHY IT"S FUNNY.
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Andy's set was actually the nicest. He didn't say anything cruel and actually undermined the format. And you found his set the funniest- I think that makes my point!
Well said Alcalde...I agree with you completely.
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I will say that Jonah Hill saying I love you after about every insult was hilarious.. He didn't want to be mean, but threw in a few good zingers.

And I love Kroll. Kroll Show rules, but i laughed at the rat face joke.
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Also it hurt my heart a little when Franco called Kroll rat-faced. <3 Kroll. KROLL U R BEAUTIFUL TO ME DON'T LISTEN TO THE HATERS.
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Cruelty isn't "funny". Rule number one of comedy is always laugh with, never at. People are not supposed to go away from a comedy routine feeling worse about themselves or the world they live in. Comedy is literally the ability to bring happiness, and that's one of the most amazing powers in the world. And like great powers, it's easy to misuse and a person who truly has a gift for comedy (which is as rare as gold) has an enormous responsibility to use it wisely.

Frankly, I'm tired of hearing that insults are comedy. They're only comedy to people who can't perform real comedy, just as rap was invented by people who can't sing to pretend they're singers and those who throw paint on canvas claim they're artists because they can't draw a straight line with a ruler. Talent is rare and skill requires years of hard work and dedication; we've tried to cheapen that by cheapening many art forms.

Anyone can hit below the belt. It takes talent to craft (yes, craft) a joke.
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I always love the sets of the less known comedians in these roasts , cause theyre usually funnier cause this could be a huge oportunity for them . eg: that Natasha chick was soo funny
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Natasha Leggaro is hilarious & she always dazzles when she's given the opportunity...I did wonder if she was either very good friends with Aziz or had some beef with him, as most of her routine focused on Anzari.
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The author needs to stick with reviewing True Blood and The Bachelorette. Comedy is clearly above her head.
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Andy Samberg was amazing. I don't usually laugh out loud even when I'm amused, but that really took me by surprise. And yeah, I had seen the Norm bit before too.
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This author has the same level of humor as Terry Schiavo. Try getting off your high horse and enjoying it for what it is - a roast, you numbnuts.
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Hey! No name-calling! We get it, you didn't like the article. No problem. But that doesn't make it okay to attack the writer. Would love to hear what you enjoyed or didn't enjoy about the roast, but please avoid the straight-up insults.
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There wasn't a specific joke I really liked from Bill Hader, but I did enjoy the bit as a whole.

Natasha Legs... I think being the least-known of the group, she purposely went harder than everyone else. Her jokes about Jonah Hill were funny. I quite loved the brashness and rudeness of her Lorne Michaels and Phil Hartman jokes. Her jokes about Ansari and Franco were pretty good too.

Meh. I didn't find Samberg's routine at all funny. I guess it was cute, though.

I didn't expect Aziz Ansari to be funny, and I was right. He seems like one of those naturally funny people, but his jokes were flat. No punchlines at all.

Jeff Ross... his jokes about Jonah Hill were pretty funny. The rest were just okay.

James Franco... as always, wasn't funny. Bleh.
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Seth Rogen was pretty funny. His best joke for me was probably the 'live tweeting... speaking about 140 characters no one gives a shit about, Bill Hader is here' joke. His The Rock joke was kinda terrible. The co-hosting the Oscars joke was funny, if not a little late.

I thought Nick Kroll would've been funnier. His Lisa Lampanelli - Jeff Ross joke was okay but I think I heard a similar joke in a previous roast. Meh @ the rest.

Jonah Hill started off pretty strong with his Bill Hader T-Mobile jokes. I thought that whole part was funny. His jokes about the others were kinda boring or awkward.

Sarah Silverman... like I did for Kroll, I expected a bit more. Best joke for me was: "Right before the show started, Seth rolled a giant fatty... because that was the only way we could get Jonah Hill onto the stage." *Giggle*
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"shaming the lovable Bill Hader for leaving SNL for “T-Mobile commercials”"

And The Awesomes, don't forget The Awesomes. He's the funniest thing on there...
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Wow....I loved it!! ..I never knew Bill Hader has a lazy eye..Thank you Jeff Ross..I may have to start following the career of Natasha Leggero..I now believe every roast needs Jeff Ross..What a delivery!!!
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please try using the word PSYCHE instead of PSYCHIC, otherwise, nice article
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Hahahahahah but what about all the damaged clairvoyants?! Thanks for the reminder
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The Dean Martin Roasts were definitely so much funnier (you can find on youtube, etc.) I'm not so bothered by the swearing as I am that the jokes just aren't necessarily funny. For James Franco's, which I'm watching on DVR right now, Seth Rogan, Jonah Hill and Bill Hader's were definitely the funniest. I don't find Sarah Silverman funny, ever. And that Natasha gal, who the heck is she? Bob Saget's roast was definitely funnier. Comedy Central definitely needs to 'rethink' who they roast and how they do it. Charlie Sheens was awful last year, and that could have been really, really funny.
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I'm actually watching the roast now. Maybe I'll kinda-sorta live comment on it.

I will say first that I tend to not like Comedy Central Roasts all that much, especially the newer ones. I always preferred the NY Friars' Club roasts. But I try to watch almost all of them anyway because I quite enjoy mean comedy.

Anyway... Seth Rogen's a decent host. His 'yuck yuck' laughter is oddly slightly charming as a host.
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Leggero and Hill killed it.
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Relax, a roast is supposed to be mean, edgy, embarresing and fun. It's just comedy...
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Is Lily Sparks the writer who dedicates whole paragraphes to the damnation of rape jokes and women getting slapped on TV?
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I just re-read the article and laughed out loud at the whole "visceral disgust" blah blah paragraph...that sort of pretentious writing seems so out of place when all you are writing about is a freakin' roast! That's all it was....it wasn't really an art piece, it wasn't anything. It was a stage for some friends to publicly make fun of each other, which they probably do to some extent on sets anyway, and make some money off of it. This roast, or any roast, doesn't deserve such deep scrutiny. This article reminds me of some college film classes, trying to find "symbolism" in scenes and things that just weren't there to begin with.

And seriously, you thought it was homophobic? That's just comedy...listening and laughing to those jokes doesn't make me want to hate gay people or poke fun of the next one I see walking down the street. I honestly don't think any of those guys on stage are even remotely homophobic. That is just comedy, folks! And especially stand up comedy. I mean really, what did you expect? Freakin' jokes about puppies and kittens and fucking butterflies? Coming from the dirty minds from some of the best comedies in the last decade?
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I wish I could review this review with the same level head you display, but the best I can come up with is that the author is an idiot. The roast was hilarious with very few misses. Will watch again.
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perhaps the only thing more ridiculous than criticizing a roast is criticizing a review of a roast. Why you mad tho?
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This is just the kind of inane response I would expect from the author of this mess of a review. That aside, I can assure you, the only thing more ridiculous than your "criticism" as a whole, are the individual jokes you took exception to. I can only assume that the jokes about Bill Hader's resume and Sarah Silverman's age must have really hit home for you. In future, you should try not to take personal offense about jokes that clearly weren't intended for you.
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Wait, wait, wait, is the person who gets paid for a living to take aim at complete strangers really calling me out for doing the same? This is some next level hilarity right here. But, whatever it takes to get a few extra page views, amirite?
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Dude, get off the computer & go for a jog. You're taking heavy aim at a complete stranger to defend a bunch of millionaires who agreed to make fun of each other. Up the B vitamins, and be nicer to yourself.
Unless this is actually Jonah Hill, in which case up the B vitamins and grow up.

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Oh, and, I believe the rhetorical question you were looking for was "You mad bro?"
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It's totally fine for you to disagree with what Lily wrote, but it's totally unacceptable to translate that disagreement into "the author is an idiot." No more personal attacks, please.
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This was just mean. The jokes were too general, insulted too many people. I think insult is part of the game for the Roast, but usually the jokes are more personalized to careers... The level of racism, sexism, ageism... It was all just too much for me.

I find Hollywood Game Night to be funnier from week to week than this ever was.
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To me Hollywood Game Night had about 4 or 5 funny episodes overall. The others had either boring and/or stupid celebrities to play their games. The season finale was arguably the worst and quite the terrible episode to end with. If you're gonna be absolute shit at the games, show some charisma or some sort of entertainment, will ya? Why bother getting people like me on the show? I don't wanna watch me, I wanna watch people who are funnier than I am, hehe. Anyway, yeah, I'm not disagreeing with you or anything, I just wanted to let out the tiny frustrations I had about HGN.
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Then why'd you watch? Don't you know Rogen and co. are known for this kind of humor?
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No, not really, actually... I don't follow their careers. I watched because I enjoyed the Bob Saget Roast a few years ago, and everyone was talking about this one, so there I was. Nothing nefarious about it.
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All right then... Majority of people enjoyed the roast but I guess some people don't appreciate the low brow kind of humor. I found the jokes to be creative but I guess that's just me.
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These roasts are always based on same things and jokes. Few stand out(Andy for example in this one),but it always has fat jokes,gay jokes,sex jokes,race jokes,etc.(And 3/4 of them ain't even funny no more,because it's the same joke,different person) You say Jonah was mean,but jokes were already written by all of them. Of course they will make jokes on him,because of his weight....
Don't pretend this is some revolutionary roast here. Go to your tweeter and facebook:D
I am just glad Lisa ain't there no more...she was disgusting. I watch roasts,if there is interesting person to watch. Sadly I watched Rosanne's and Charlie Sheen's roast and what a huge mistake that was. I watched others as well,but I did enjoy some.
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Do people not remember that Jonah HIll made his name in comedy from SUPERBAD? Do you remember the subtle and thoughtful comedy of that movie? NO, you don't. Relentless, petty, mean, and sick- this is what he was known for and I think he may have been reminding people of that, and it was certainly a decent showcase for it.
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I honestly thought I would never EVER defend Jonah Hill, in any context, but to be fair....THIS WAS A ROAST! How on earth was he petty or mean? I know he's become a bit of a douche, but honestly....he was trading barbs with his best buddies! I didn't see any vindictive or mean streak....in fact, he seemed to take the jokes aimed at him in good stride and laughed harder than anyone else. These guys, like it or not, are some of the most popular movie comics out there, so they gotta be doing something right, ya? I didn't think Jonah Hill was particularly funny, but I didn't see any particular pettiness on that stage. I thought the roast overall was pretty hilarious, and full of Judd Apatow-era humor on a somewhat raunchier and more personal scale.
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I think there's definitely a way to needle someone in a way even they find funny- calling out something true about them a good friend would notice,or simply making a funny joke that could stand up as a funny piece of writing no matter who it was about. Then there's what Jonah Hill did: he attacked the men's resumes, then dressed down Sarah Silverman for not having a kid. Is it funny to say the meanest thing you can say, or just an easy way to shock people into laughter?
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Wow, you're actually complaining about "attacks" against the resume of a well known, millionaire actor? THE HORROR! How dare he stoop so low.
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the only genius thing about Franco is how he's managed to convince the world he has talent.
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I have watched all the roasts, sat through them all. I have seen the Dean Martin series and the Comedy Central series. But this one I had to shut this one off after about 30 minutes. I just couldn't get into it

This was just a tempest of bad jokes and low blows that dripped with disdain. In the old days, friends and fellow accompished entertainers would come together to roast the guest of honor. Sure, the jokes hit hard, but they still had the tone of respect and love underlying them.

Maybe the problem was with the fact that Franco really did not deserve a roast to begin with. Yes he has accomplished a lot as an actor, artist, and scholar but has he reached a level high enough to warrant a roast at this age, I just don't feel that he has yet. Maybe in a few years, but just not now.

Then you have the roasters. While I am happy that they actually went with at least some of Franco's actual friends rather than the standard roast lineup, I don't feel like the lineup work all that well. Silverman and Ross are veterans but I doubt they know Franco all that well. Hill and Rogen, while Franco's friends and great actors, did not seem comfortable up there.
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Rogen does stand up comedy and I thought he was a great host. Bill Hader is an snl vet and was having a blast. Jonah did sweat a lot but even said he thinks everything said about him was cathartic and great. The only one who looked a bit uncomfortable was Samberg but it could just be how he is in person. I'm glad you turned it off instead of watching the whole thing and then complaining about it. If it's not your comedic style I respect that. But I thought the jokes were brilliant. As someone who appreciates the Apatow brand of humor the Seinfeld brand and even the Mel Brooks brand. To each his own I guess
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I honestly don't know where to begin..... This is a roast! Maybe not a PG roast like it was in the 60's and 70's but when you get a bunch of Judd Apatow actors and a NEW generation of comedians together it's going to be a little raunchy.... The whole thing with Jonah Hill being too mean and then people following suit.... You do know the whole point of a roast is to make fun of every single one there trying to be as cruel as you can without going nuclear which no one really did. And the fact that every single person was laughing hysterically when they were roasted including Jonah and Bill Hader who were probably laughing the most shows that everyone there was pretty much friends and knew what they were getting themselves into. It is to be take as seriously as comedy should be... Not serious at all. The gay jokes have been discussed on numerous other forums and honestly I didn't see anything wrong with them. They were not offensive to gay's they were more so poking fun of Franco trying to hide the fact that he was gay. If he is or isn't is beside the point. Everyone on that panel was a bleeding liberal and I guarantee you all support gay rights as do I. So they clearly weren't trying to offend anyone. Even my gay friends thought it was funny and took no offense to it. Over analyzing a roast is like trying to find out if there is double meaning to an episode of a kids program there is no point because it is as straightforward as it gets. This is a roast we make fun of you in good nature and that's all. Lastly the whole thing with Franco saying this was just another artistic ploy was clearly making fun of himself not trying to break ground on some artistic exploration of pop culture. But really me ranting like this does no good the best thing I can say is if people get offended by roasts then there's one simple thing you can do. Don't watch them.
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Perfectly worded, this post should be stuck at the top. Its absolutely hilarious to me that someone could get their panties (gotta be granny panties in this case) in such a wad over this roast.
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Omg, thank you. I feel like Tv.com should immediately fire the author of this shitty review and hire you in his place.
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An opinion is an opinion. Lily expressed hers, and you are welcome to express yours, but please keep things civil and skip the direct insults. The comments section is not a roast!
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I agree with no name calling. On a side note because I didn't know how to officially ask a question to TV.COM why are there no weekly reviews on It's Always Sunny In Philadelphia? I feel this is an extremely successful show that has a huge audience and has been on the air for a while now. You'd think it would warrant a weekly review! Heck I'd even do it. But I was just curious as to why there are no reviews for this great show.
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The best CC Roast I've seen was Bob Saget's. Truly funny, snarky, friendly jabs with some seedy backbiting. I think most of these have missed the mark in that they are suppose to be 60% honoring the person being roasted with barbs/jabs/hooks just short of uppercuts and 40% jokes about recent headlines/the other comedians present.

While I have not seen the James Franco roast (I dont think he should have gotten one), I do plan on catching it on Netflix down the line.

Although one can with all honesty say that James Franco Roast happens everyday on Twitter. Zing.
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I must say, Ross was awesome. He tore jonah hill in pieces. That bit was really the best part of the roast. The rest was not really great. Some better then others but mostly only worthy of a 65/100. Seth and Jonah are forces to be reckoned with. These boys are the new comedy kings.
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Andy had best roast,because you have to use brains to understand his roast. He roasted like no other and didn't go with same boring roast as some do. Rest had some good jokes in their mix,but were pretty much the same..."oh Jonah,you fat...oh gay,...oh race,..." Ross is pretty boring at times,but still can deliver joke or two. Jonah had great one on Bill, Bill had some great ones. To make it short...Andy had the best in my eyes,rest of them had few good ones.
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