Justified "Peace of Mind" Review: Truth and Consequences

Justified S04E12: "Peace of Mind"

After last week’s barnburner and ahead of next week’s season finale, “Peace of Mind” downshifted a bit to let recent developments breathe and move a few game pieces into place. With Drew Thompson safely ensconced in the clutches of federal law enforcement, the next target in the Great Harlan County Scavenger Hunt of 2013 was Ellen May, the “trailer park bunk bunny” with the “tragic Southern name.” Drew has made her safety a condition of his cooperation; the cops needed to find her so he would play ball, and the criminals needed to find her so he wouldn’t.

So where the Marshals should've been celebrating a victory lap—and where Raylan should’ve been enjoying a hard-earned suspension—they instead ventured once more unto the Harlan breach. Raylan was particularly insistent that he be allowed to tie up this last loose end before being relieved of duty, since what's waiting for him back in civilian life is an estranged ex and their unborn child, domestic concerns that leave him completely out of his depth. 


Yet it’s a testament to the way Justified has honed its use of supporting characters this season that neither Raylan nor Boyd was involved in the best stretch in “Peace of Mind,” when all the parties in search of Ellen May converged. She had sought sanctuary and salvation at the erstwhile church of Preacher Billy, and the sequence of events that unfolded there distilled many of the show’s chief strengths into one long, deliberately paced act. The focus and the sources of tension shifted repeatedly without feeling abrupt, and brought a measure of closure to several characters.

I think it’s worth examining the scene as a stylistic contrast to “Decoy.” While that episode demonstrated again how much pleasure Justified can wring not just out of violence but out of the threat of violence, this week’s centerpiece proved equally effective at a far more difficult task: mining drama from the decision-making processes that lead to those threats and that violence.

Ava laid that out quite explicitly. Notwithstanding Ellen May’s assessment of God’s will, it was the choices people made that put both of them (and Cassie) in their situation. And all three of them have long been, to differing extents, more the objects of other people’s choices than masters of their own volition. Boyd and Ava sent Ellen May on the run; Shelby took her in, then delivered her to Limehouse; Limehouse succombed to a pang of mercy, leaving her free but adrift. Cassie was only in Harlan to receive Ellen May’s confession because she was carrying on her brother’s legacy; “he was the true believer,” she admitted. Ava, too, has often followed in the wake of a more determined will, her actions guided by total faith in Boyd. 

But there in the church, all three had the chance to do, as Ava emphasized, what was right in their hearts, fully aware of the consequences. Ellen May, whose defining naivety had curdled into a weary fatalism after so many betrayals and manipulations, at last unburdened her soul. Cassie, whose role in Billy’s evangelizing had been at least partially cynical, stood strong with a lost girl who had no place else to go. And for all her criminal activity and adjacency to the same, for all the damage her former charge could do to her, Ava was unwilling to become a cold-blooded killer. 

Hence Colt’s presence as the backup plan, because Ellen May still posed a threat to both Boyd and the Detroit mob. Narratively speaking, Ellen May was expendable enough to be in very real danger throughout the episode, so the stakes never faltered even as the center of gravity shifted. With Ava holding the gun, the tension stemmed from an internal, character-based source; with Limehouse’s rueful warning still ringing in her ears, how much of a villain would she let herself be? When Colt arrived, the crux of the danger became an external, plot-oriented one: He would ice her without breaking a sweat unless something intervened.

Intervention arrived in the form of Tim, and the locus of the tension seamlessly shifted once more as these two by-now-old foes squared off a final time. Inverting their rapid-fire battle of wits in “Decoy,” this was a duel of pure nerve. But once the name of Tim’s murdered buddy was invoked, the outcome was all but sealed. Tim, with retribution as much as justice behind his eyes, was determined to squeeze the trigger at the slightest provocation. Colt, whose assessment that “most of [Mark] died somewhere in Kandahar” carried a whiff of projection, was determined to provoke. 


Amid routine (but routinely funny) Justified motions—cops rousting criminals for information, criminals rousting other criminals for information—“Peace of Mind” trusted its crescendo to a mostly verbal setpiece among two of the show’s less developed regulars and three recurring characters. That’s a daunting feat for any series to pull off, especially in a season’s penultimate episode, and it's a mighty feat that Graham Yost, credited writers Taylor Elmore and Leonard Chang, and director Gwyneth Horder-Payton did so in such a rewarding fashion.

As a result, Ellen May enjoyed a warm, if brief, reunion with her ersatz father figure Drew—chaperoned by Raylan, who couldn’t help but feel stung by his own paternal insecurities. With Drew’s deal on track at long last, the Marshal can turn his attention to his personal life. But so too can Detroit, as Nicky’s man Picker infiltrated Winona’s home in perhaps TV history’s most nerve-wracking cliffhanger based around a rocking chair. The object of Theo Tonin’s revenge appears to have shifted. After this week’s wary, meditative installment, the finale looks set to once again ratchet up the threat level.



POSTCARDS FROM HARLAN COUNTY

– Kudos to Abby Miller. Her character began in a space somewhere between comic relief and hapless innocent, but this episode demanded a quiet, disarming pathos and she delivered.

– My second-favorite scene of the episode was the confrontation on the porch of the barbecue shack. I loved the way the blocking and framing put Raylan right in the midst of Limehouse and his muscle, while setting the other two Marshals starkly apart. And I loved how Rachel decisively slapped down yet another man who thought he can size her up easily.

– Seriously, did anyone else think that rocker was going to, like, explode or something when Winona sat down?

– “What’s the matter with you, Raylan? Are you not used to positive attention?”

– Rachel demanded to know what we were all wondering: “Does this mean you’re finally getting a haircut?” And Raylan promptly shot us all down: “Don’t hold your breath.”

– Art thinks Julia Roberts looks too much like Eric, albeit with better legs.

– “You know, suspendees don’t get to choose when they get suspended. That would be ‘vacation.’”

– “Don’t you know how to win? Can’t you enjoy anything?”

– “It’s Everybody Wins Day here at Johnny’s bar. Everybody except Johnny.”

– “I’m gonna need Google Translate on my phone if I’m gonna keep talking to you.”

– “He’s gonna back me up, I’ve got to put my boot up your ass out here in front of everybody.”

– “Did you not wake up this morning thinking today was another opportunity to mess up some bad guy’s day? I did.”

– “Don’t do that. Don’t even think about that. That ain’t gonna end well for you.”

– “It’s my job, being a dick. It’d be weird if you liked me.”’

– “Good plan. Small problem.”

– “I guess I’ll quit today.”

– “He’s still lookin’ out for you. Else none of us would be here.”

– Thanks to Tim for asking me to fill in this week. He'll be back next week to wrap up Season 4.

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Nervous for Winona now that the actress is on the Following.
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I like how the writers of Justified know what the audience is thinking. Like really, the whole Raylan should get a haircut comment, using Google to translate Boyd (gotta love how Boyd phrases things) - who hasn't thought of these things? This show is seriously one of the best, if not the best, shows on right now. Couple of random comments: I totally thought the rocking chair was going to blow up haha. And I'm glad Johnny's still around - I liked Colt, but his time was definitely ending and I'm glad they didn't draw out the whole Colt-Tim dynamic for too long - but I'll for sure be sadder if/when they kill off Johnny (I don't really know why but I really like his character).
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I am so pleased Wynona is back! I was hoping her absence from The Following was because she was back in Justified for the finale and my wishes came true. A brilliant ending.
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For a murderous thug, Colt was rather sympathetic. I'll miss that guy.
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I am now extremly annoyed by whatever Ava says or do.. Put that aside, another great episode, sad to see Colt go, but hey, we knew that it was coming
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Colt was a total suicide-by-cop. He had made up his mind, smoked his last cigarette and the actor did an awesome job of showing that decision in his eyes. He knew he was going to die and he welcomed it. Awesome, awesome episode!
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I was waiting for that rocking-chair to explode - but they wouldn't do that to the beautiful Natalie Zea!
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BEST.DIALOGUES.EVER! Awesome episode!
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Maybe these hard-hitting shows have "jaded" me, but I found Colt's death was underwhelming. I liked it when Ellen Mae finally took off her rose-colored glasses.
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another excellent episode in a excellent series (in the top 10 of my favorite series)! Great review;-)
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Oh my lawd all I can say is next week is sure gonna be BODY COUNT and MAYHEM!!!
I love this show.
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Thanks, Andy, for giving us a (great) review for the week.

That last scene was great. I didn't think it'd be a bomb, just because Picker was putting the chair together in front of her and Winona's not blind or stupid. But I did think Picker would shoot her at some point. The fact that he made his own way out, rather than Winona walking him to the door, suggested to me that he may not have left... that as soon as she sat down and was in a more disadvantaged position, he'd walk back in and shoot her.

When Raylan suggested to Art that Tim and Rachel come along with him, I went "Yay!" Then when Raylan and Rachel left Tim up with Limehouse, I went "Awww." Then when Tim came to the church near the end, I went "Yay!" True story.

Loved this episode. Can't wait for the finale.
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If Picker is not rigging that rocker what the bleep else was he doing there?
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Well, since it didn't work out like the shooting scenario I said, I can think of a few others that maybe makes a bit more sense than a bomb:

-- Getting a good look around the house, for two reasons: 1) Augustine, through Picker, or Picker himself, can later threaten Raylan with Winona's life, showing it's not a completely idle threat by being able to describe something like the baby's room... 2) Picker could take a quick look around and see possible entry points, kind of like a brief surveillance around the place in case he or others have to go back in later.

-- Giving Winona a reason to call Raylan (I think she thinks he sent the chair), he'll say he didn't, she'll give confused, and he may ask about what the guy looked like.

I can probably think of others, but these two are more common scenarios. You see bad guys all the time in shows "making contact" with loved ones of the good guys they're up against.

Tonin, Augustine, Picker, etc. are very bad guys, sure, but they don't seem like the type that'd be able to have tiny-sized explosives small enough to hide in the small pieces of a rocking chair. If on the outside of the chair, it'd probably be a little too obvious and Winona could've seen it while Picker was assembling the chair together.

Obviously, I could be wrong and the next episode could start off with Winona sitting there and hearing a ticking sound, or with a shot of the house and seeing it explode, or with Tonin/Augustine calling Raylan and telling him there's a bomb in Winona's baby room, but I think I'm leaning towards the absence of a bomb.
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I like the notion of Winona calling Rayland about a chair he didn't send though I'm still clinging to an exploding chair !
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Eh, Winona is kind of stupid.
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I was think the Detroit Mob are going to Kidnap wyonna in order to get Raylan to give them Ellen May. That would make most sense.
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I thought it was obvious that it was one of Tonin's men installing the chair, because there really was no other reason for that scene. But I never even thought of a bomb until I read these comments. If Tonin wanted to send Raylan a message, he would have had Winona shot or kidnapped. message sent, and less worry about installation and evidence. I don't know if the fact that Tonin has people on Winona is going to be a part of next weeks' episode, or next season, but with Arlo gone, Raylan really has the one vulnerable spot left (two after the baby girl is born) so I am looking forward to it.

I was happy to see Ellen May survive, wasn't sure they were going to let that happen.I get why Boyd and Ava knew to go to the church to look for her, she left them for it before. I can't remember any scene where Raylan knew that.

And the Google translate line was hilarious.
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Justified feels like having the cake and eating too. Great writing, no massive plot holes, fantastic acting and wonderful pacing. This episode showcased everything great about his show and why it is one of the best shows made.
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I need a memory refresher on the first couple of seasons, but how long has Theo Tonin been in the background now? We know he sent Robert Quarles to Harlan in season 3 (as punishment of some sort) and Wynn Duffy before that, but I forget if he was mentioned or had any part of season 1 or 2. But it's been occurring to me lately that Theo Tonin, while never on screen other than a lone conversation with Quarles last season, has been somewhat of a constant in the background for a while now. Most seasons we're given a Big Bad for the season. This year we didn't really get that, but it dawns on me that it could be because there is a bigger arc building to Justified....a series arc rather than just a season arc. Something along the lines of Theo Tonin vs. Raylan Givens. If you think about it, look how many problems Raylan has already indirectly given Tonin. By this point Raylan has to be a huge thorn in Tonin's side. He's killed his henchmen, stepped on his Kentucky operations, and now directly put Tonin in the Fed's sights. I wasn't really surprised by the end scene because I've been thinking how long it would be before the Detroit Mob went after Raylan in some way or another (which is not to say that final scene wasn't chilling). I could be wrong on this, but it seems we've got the foundation laid for a broader Raylan/Marshalls vs. Tonin/mobsters storyline.
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The idea that this was "breathing" seems a bit disingenuous. Yes, they had less to do and less weight of concern doing it, but the characters weren't really let out to breathe and the motivations never got to see the light of day. We saw actions, like Tim intercepting Colt at the makeshift church, but we never saw WHY he decided to go there and break ranks at Limehouse's place. He gunned down Colton, but we never got to have the moment breathe with character-driven motivations, Colt lived and died with no depth, why did he shoot Tonin's sniper last episode, where was his head here in dragging out that cigarette? Where was the witty banter or the character moments to go with all the empty space in this episode? We got a big moment from Ava, and as usual a lot of noise from Limehouse, but very little actual breathing.

I didn't dislike this episode by any stretch, but I feel like the review presented doesn't jive with what was actually on the screen, that all this subtext bubbled up to a "verbal setpiece" - I couldn't even tell you where that scene would be, was it Tim vs Colt? Compared to their verbal shootout last week this was tame and one-sided and hollow. And coming off of such a winner last week, this felt like a real stall.

Also, the ending of the episode with Augustine's best boy giving Winona a chair in suggestion of greater danger really seems like a soap opera ending, not grounded in any reality whatsoever. I would guess they found Winona from the paperwork she sent Raylan, but again we ask what risk is really worth it to a mobster to go after a federal agent so hard, and again we're left with not enough.

Yes, I did also think the rocker had a chance of exploding, that's how soapy that scene was.
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To your question about Colt's motivation for killing the sniper last episode--we can't forget Colt has a drug problem and addicts don't always behave rationally. But more likely, I took it to imply that Colt was trying to thin Detroit's herd, so to speak, as they had come to town not to happy with Boyd and his crew. The less Detroit thugs on the scene, the better off Boyd and thus Colt himself are. Evening out the odds, so to speak. Remember Yolo and Augustine had been beating on Boyd not too long before Colt did that.

To your question about would a mobster really go after a Federal Agent's family--I think in Theo Tonin's case, yes, because it's part of off his ongoing off-screen characterization. If you think about it, he's been quietly in the background for a while now. I think we may be building to a series arc that deals with Raylan vs. Tonin. Plus, we already know Tonin is crazy. And think about the trouble Raylan has already been to him from a distance. Plus Drew Thompson/Shelby is now going to be giving the Feds everything they need to take down Tonin, so Tonin may figure he's done anyway and so now he just wants to make sure he puts Raylan through as much hell as he can on his way down.
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I'm with you, @2muchbadTV, I think Colt took out the sniper because, while no genius the man was quite intelligent, enough to survive several tours in "The Sandbox" and Afghanistan and is able to calculate a simple linear equation: Detroit mob + Raylan/US Marshals - Drew/Shelby = Dead Crowder Gang. As soon as Colt realized there was pretty much no hope of mission success his mission needed to shift from "get Drew" to "stay alive" and the most efficient way to do that would be to surgically reduce the imminent threats, in this case the Detroit guys. Colton would have learned in the Army that when cut off from command a soldier needs to make decisions in the field and it is just common sense that the sniper had orders to kill him regardless of the outcome of their foray. Augustine and Tonin have little lose by killing off the Crowders, a group of potential witnesses with ties to the US Marshals, which is precisely why Boyd wanted Ava to go to Limehouse alone, shifting her out of the line of fire and into an environment few would risk attempting to penetrate.

I'm still perplexed as to Colt's motivation for suicide-by-cop, but as previously discussed, addicts are often irrational and unpredictable.
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I think Colt would rather go down with suicide by cop than go to prison. He was getting arrested if he dropped his gun. I am presuming here that this was the same gun that he used to kill Tims friend, because of the seen with Boyd where he mentioned that he was using his army piece. And who knows what else it would link him to, the snipers death etc?
I get that Colt killed the sniper guy to even the odds, what I don't get is why Augustine wouldn't question what happened his man?
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Interesting thoughts. Drug addicts rarely are irrational like that, they are undependable and selfish and motivated by personal need over everything else, but they're not bugnuts random unless they're under heavy hallucinogens or they're already suffering severe mental disorders. I've worked with them in the past, they are weighed down by pain in their pasts and their actions aren't generally disconnected like that once you see where they're coming from.

As for thinning the Detroit herd, I suppose it's possible but that'd be Boyd's call and Boyd seemed to need those guys to get higher up in the mob at that moment. There are no tracks to cover, the sniper guy and Colton didn't bungle their move, they simply got outplayed because there wasn't enough of them vs the marshals. Boyd deserved the beating he was catching from Augustine, he failed miserably on big promises he made, and didn't seem to hunger for revenge over it.

I don't buy Tonin as a character though, his motivations are ridiculous comic book levels of stupidity. The mob works when it is just underground enough not to rile up the federal boys, when they start attracting this much attention they generally get snuffed out hard. I'm used to the Justified universe having smarter characters than just going for cheap revenge, Tonin could use those resources to leave town and regroup outside the reach of the law, or go to ground and hide, or a million other actions; instead this guy is a rabid dog going crazy on one target and then lashes out at Raylan to get what he wants despite knowing there's no way he's going to break down that system, it's cartoonish writing on the show's part - anybody so stupid to think that running an organization that way would never rise to the levels high enough to run it.
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"It’s my job, being a dick. It’d be weird if you liked me." This is probably one of the best lines from the series. It is just good and for me it kind of plays to the audience. Because it is weird that we enjoy Raylan when he is being a dick.

Great episode again. Ava really kind of led it for me and the quips between Tonin and Boyd were hilarious. The google translate quip was hilarious.

The only thing kind of disappointing for me was the end of Colt. I thought with all of the quips and back and forth between he and Tim it would have been grander. I still think the better ending would have been for Tim to shoot him when he was talking to the girl before. But then we wouldn't have gotten the great conversation from them last episode.

The Winona thing was oddly expected. The tail of Raylan is a tragic one, and he is having a really good time right now. I don't think it is going to end well for him via Winona and the baby.
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Haha, that was my favorite line as well. It really has a good sound logic to it.
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That was a great line. My favorite is still Art's "Marshall stiffie" from way back this season. Nothing yet has topped that one for me.
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Can you fill in next week, too? I appreciate your reviews much more than Tim's.
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I also thought that rocker was gonna go. That would have been a shocker. Also i got to give props to the writers. All the one liners was just great and funny.
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One of either Winona or Ava isn't making it out of this season alive. I don't think this story is going to go "Spartacus" and kill a baby but the way that last scene had you on the tips of your toes sure let the mind go there. The stories of Colt and Ava and their similarities of both at least somewhat desirous of being "good" people coverged beautifully. It was the same journey all 4 of the players in the scene before Tim's arrival had been going through in one form or another for the entire season. Colt had fallen so far from what he wanted to be and was just spent. Joelle Carter, Ron Eldard, Lindsy Pulsifer, and Abby Miller made that scene work perfectly. All of these "bad guys" who were starting to smell the stink in that corner. The Tim and Cassie scene was great, he really has a lot of Raylan in him but at least this girl seems to want to change after seeing what happened to her brother. Hopefully she has some life expectancy in this cast.

One final thought, John Kapelos from high school janitor to mob henchman, is that upward momentum?;)

The Ava story this episode from the scene in the bar when Ava seemed to be the only person in the room who was concerned for Johnny, to her visit to her old friend who couldn't even recognize her anymore, to her sneaking out the tent as Colt was shot was my favorite part of the episode. Joelle Carter gets my MVP this week. Exceptionally worried about Ava as the season draws to a close.
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Totally thought the rocker was going to blow up.
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Me too. But who knows ...
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I'm going to be spending this entire week guessing and second guessing the Winona finale; 'They might kill her off as she's not been around at all' vs 'THEY CAN'T KILL WINONA!'. Might have to take some epic sleeping pills and sleep for a week...
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I had worried a little when the third season slipped a bit after that amazing second season. (Margo Martindale will now *always* be Mags Bennett, no matter how much other great work she does on however many other shows.) But my faith has been fully restored after the week-in, week-out excellence of this fourth season. Every hour of it has felt like it was only twenty minutes long, one of the clearest signs of great TV.
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I agree I thought they couldn't top Mags from season 1, BUT Robert Quayles came real close in season 2. This season has just been a diffuse excellence with no standout performers.
I still get chills thinking about Quayles he was out of control and just a total psycho played with gusto by Neal McDonough! And Mags death scene ....the best thing on TV.
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How is it this possible that a show can be this awesome from start to finish. I have so much to say but it would be pointless to reiterate what's already been stated. #justified.
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I nearly passed out from holding my breath when Winona sat down in that chair and began rocking. The scene ended and the commercial break was blaring before I relaxed enough to have a go at breathing again. I just cannot imagine the wrecked shell of a human being Raylan would become if Winona and their little baby girl were murdered by the mob in the wake of his daddy's murder. Biblical. That's what that would be. Thankfully we will probably know next week that I worried for nothing. This isn't Revolution, after all.

We haven't seen much of Ellstin Limehouse this season, which is a shame, because like Boyd he always has a unique and colorful way of viewing the world. It was his view on the events of last season and this season, imparted as advice of caution to Ava, such a departure from the Machiavellian patriarch of last season, that gave me pause. Limehouse had so many plans last season, and certainly Noble's Holler must have been the backwoods bank to more than just the Bennett's ill-gotten gains, but until this episode it hadn't occurred to me that there may have been greater costs paid by Limehouse and the Noble's Holler community for their part in last season's shenanigans than the loss of the Bennett funds. In this episode we saw a different Limehouse, older, a bit tired, still calculating and a force to be reckoned with, but no longer ambitious regardless of consequence, a man changed by failures and their costs, by the burden of his responsibility for those failures and the effect it had on the people he cared for. I was relieved that he and Ava have the sort of relationship to have that conversation, that his words echoed misgivings she herself possessed and that in the end she chose not to kill Ellen Mae in cold blood.

Am I wrong or did Tim take Colt's aviators as a trophy after he shot him? I was pretty sure that was what that was and it kinda freaked me out, so if I am off on that please someone set me straight. I was sad to see Colt's suicide by cop. For all his poor performance at being Boyd's henchman, he was a clever conversationalist full of humorous repartee. It is also sad that the veterans portrayed are suffering so, even Tim, and so little assistance for them. Perhaps Cassie and Tim's budding friendship will bring them both some comfort.

I am happy that Tim and Rachel had more screen time this episode, but it hasn't been nearly enough this season. It's driving me nuts that something has been up with Rachel, around mid-season she began to talk to Raylan about whatever her issue was when they were interrupted. I have been waiting all season for her to finally have her come to Jesus with the man and I'm pretty sure now it isn't going to happen before the finale's end, if at all. I love Raylan and Boyd and their special relationship, but it is rare when a show has such excellent supporting characters with such dazzling chemistry as Justified has in Art, Rachel and Tim and it is a shame they don't have more screen time.

Raylan's having a baby girl. In about 13 year there will be a whole mess of problems that cannot be solved with a gun.
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I agree that taking the aviators seemed like he was taking a trophy. And I've never seen a reference to a sniper doing that.
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That really set me back. We know Tim is a little intense, but that seemed a rather odd thing to do. Is it at all possible that those shades belonged to Mark, were taken when Colt raided that dealer's house, and Tim was simply taking them back? I'm fairly certain Colton has had those shades from the start of the season, but I cannot come up with any other plausible explanation for Tim's action. He had to feel a bit conflicted about the necessity of killing a fellow veteran; Colt left him with no other option but that one is still likely to leave a mark. The shades have me perplexed. I'm just hoping this isn't the writers slow build on a "Tim's cracking up" storyline; not that I get a vote, but I would veto that. Tim is best when he is full of piss and vinegar with a full repertoire of sassy zingers.
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I may be way off base here but I think Tim had some understanding/sympathy for Colton. Yes, he hated him for killing his friend but he could relate to the PTSD and I think he realized Colton was doing suicide by cop. I saw it as a sign of respect for a fellow veteran (respect for the veteran part and worthy opponent when not high, not the friend-killer part).

Also the witty repartee they had last episode may of contributed to his feelings (respect the battle skills and the suffering of the veteran even though it led him down the wrong path).

Maybe it was just to remember him by--remember a fellow veteran who didn't have the support system (or internal conscience...but he didn't kill Ellen May--I thought it was Ella May) to get though it as well as Tim.

I could be totally wrong but I just don't see Tim going serial killer and keeping trophies to relive the kill
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Yes, I agree with the understanding point. I don't think Tim would sympathise with Colts actions, but he probably realises that his own life could have easily gone the way of Colts or his friends Mark.
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Great episode. Not as great as last week, but few hours of television are. I loved Nicky's "google translate" line. And even more so Tim's The Fugitive reference!! Waited four years for someone to pull a Tommy Lee Jones on this show.

I'm sad to see Colt go, I think he really hit his stride in the second half of this season and became a really interesting character. It was obvious from the time he killed Mark that Tim was going to kill him, but I would've liked to see him stick around.

I wonder who Boyd's new right hand man is going to be now that Colts dead and Johnny betrayed him?
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