Mad Men: Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap

Mad Men S05E11: "The Other Woman"

It’s Pete Campbell’s world, everybody else is just being manipulated in it.

I want to like Pete Campbell. Deep down inside, I know he’s a giant douchebag, but every now and then he proves his worth as a human being, or at the very least, makes me feel sorry for him.

“The Other Woman” wasn’t one of those times. When Herb—the head of the Jaguar dealerships, and one of the most influential decision-makers over at Jaguar—implied that a night in bed with Joan Harris would guarantee his vote in favor of Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce, Pete made it priority numero uno to get Joan to take one for the team. He tried to ask nicely. Then he tried to bargain. Then he tried to guilt-trip her before finally looping back around to bargaining when he told all the other partners about his plan and made it sound like Joan would be willing to work some special overtime for the appropriate compensation. Of course, providing appropriate compensation ($50,000, or four times Joan’s yearly salary) would require another extension on SCDP’s credit line, and Lane was still sweating his first spin on the embezzlement wheel, so he wanted very badly to avoid a trip to the bank this week.

So Lane tried to shoot down Pete’s pimptastic aspirations. Don was outraged because he had PRINCIPLES. Also, after their successful outing at the Jaguar dealership and the subsequent cocktail-soaked heart-to-heart, Joan is his new favorite female. Roger was incredulous, then calmed down when Pete made it sound like the whole idea was Joan’s. I feel like Roger should have known her better than that, but maybe he was feeling a little insulted that she apparently wouldn’t let him pay for his own child, yet she’d essentially whore herself to get a little financial security. I don’t know, he got his panties unwadded pretty fast. Bert Cooper was scandalized because once again, he was forced to realize he works with a bunch of savages.

Pete passionately argued that everyone at the agency had worked so hard over the past six weeks preparing the proposal (you know, when they weren’t eating catered lobster and getting lap dances from Megan’s actress friend in the conference room). “Now we’re just going to walk away? Over what?”

Oh nothing, just Joan’s dignity.

So, like the fine upstanding men that they are, the equally scandalized but far less principled partners of Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce waited until Don left the room and voted to pay Joan to bang Herb. Since Don wasn’t there, his vote was in absentia, and SCDP fumbled its way into a business model that suddenly relied on prostitution to gain business.

Wow, things have gone downhill really fast for the company, haven’t they?

And of course, Lane Pryce did the dirty work, mostly in an attempt to avoid groveling at the bank. He offered Joan a partnership in return for her cooperation, argued that a partnership would go much further than a measly $50,000 with a child to care for. He touched on his own lack of satisfaction in the company and said that in the past, when people asked him what he wanted, he never told them the truth. Cue the sad face. I would have cared a lot more about his miserable existence if he wasn’t actively participating in the most horrific thing the men at Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce have done to date. Maybe we should revise the Mad Men deathwatch of a few weeks ago and add Lane to the list of potential goners. Between his general unhappiness coupled with continued financial woes, and now his role as middle man in the SCDP pimping enterprise, well, I wonder how he sleeps at night.

When Don found out about everything, he headed straight for Joan’s and attempted to talk her out of it. He said that if they didn’t get Jaguar’s account, then so be it, he didn’t want to do business with men like that anyway. Remember kids, Don Draper has PRINCIPLES.

In the morning, Don made the pitch to Jaguar, a heavily sexualized campaign that compared the lovely but dysfunctional Jaguar cars to mistresses—without actually using the word mistress, of course. “Jaguar: At last, something beautiful you can truly own.” Don’s pitch was cut with scenes from Joan’s night with Herb, leading us to believe that she had ignored Don’s plea and slept with the creep anyway. The degradation of Joan Harris might just be one of the most unsettling and certainly upsetting scenes in Mad Men history. My skin crawled and Christina Hendricks managed to convey Joan’s disgust with the situation, with Herb, and mostly with herself, using little more than her facial expressions.

The men of SCDP betrayed Joan, whom they previously held in rather high esteem. She had always been, even moreso than Peggy, the woman in the office who could go toe-to-toe with the powerful men she worked with. Don confessed to initially fearing her when he began at Sterling Cooper in the fifties. She was a force to be reckoned with in the office. She was beautiful, yes, but essential to daily operations for her intelligence, experience, and professionalism. Men have lost their jobs in the past for objectifying her and while, in the instance of Joey and his crass comic back in Season 4, Joan didn’t approve of the action, there had to be a sense of comfort, despite her protestations to the contrary, that she was respected at work. Valued.

After doing her implied duty with Herb, Joan returned home and donned her green silk robe, right before Don knocked on her door, revealing to we the audience that Joan hadn’t ignored Don’s plea at all. He simply didn’t get there in time—the prince arrived too late to slay the dragon and they lived unhappily ever after.

I was half-expecting Jaguar to go with another ad agency despite Joan’s actions just to cement their sleaze status, but Herb apparently kept to his side of the bargain and Jaguar signed with Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce for all of the company's advertising and womanizing needs. Joan’s partnership was announced, but no one really felt like partying. Oh, and Peggy quit her job to go work for Cutler, Gleason, and Chough because she was feeling neglected or something. She’ll be back. Probably.

Elsewhere...


Pete Campbell Sucks:

Pete told Trudy that after SCDP signed Jaguar, he wanted his own apartment in the city. He brought up her habit of being in her pajamas by dinnertime. He doesn’t realize how good he has it. I mean, those were some stylish pajamas Trudy was rocking. If I were wearing those PJs at dinnertime, I’d be getting grilled about what the big occasion is.

Also, apparently Pete hasn’t been getting it on with Trudy, much to her frustration. Really, Pete? Really?


Peggy Olsen, Professional Black Sheep:

I don’t really blame her for leaving, though the Padawan teaming-up with Ted Chough was an understandably low blow to Jedi Master Draper. Peggy got herself a better title and a jaw-dropping raise for jumping ship. I hope it’s worth it, but knowing Mad Men, it won’t be.


Starring Megan Draper:

Megan got a callback for a play that would require three months of rehearsals in Boston. Don was displeased. She said that if she ever had to pick between her job and Don, she’d pick Don, but she’d hate him for making her do it. Megan is such a drama queen these days. Pun intended.


What'd you think of this week's episode?

Comments (54)
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Best episode so far this season. Remembered me "The Carousel" with Dons pitch and Joan in the hotel mixed scenes.
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I am really worried for Joan. I m not sure if she will continue to command the same respect she once did. Don has already started to look at her differently. Pete and Lane really crossed the line in this ep, and I am disapointed in Roger too. I can't wait to see the fallout from this over the rest of the season. :-D
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Don did grow up poor as dirt during the Depression, but Don's "principles" regarding anyone contemplating trading their body for financial gain are not so much him being a better man than the other partners (except Pete Campbell, he is sub-human), but likely has more to do with the fact that his mother was a prostitute and he grew up in a brothel until she died and he had to go live with the Whitmans, his alleged biological father and bitter step-mother. He mentioned this earlier in "Signal 30" when they took the Mohawk execs to that "party." He does care for Joan, certainly, but his pride in the quality of SCDP's work as a direct reflection on himself, his distaste for the world's oldest profession, and the idea that the very survival of the firm has been secured on the back of one of the firm's women, has soured any work on the account completely and tainted SCDP for him.
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I really do agree with you about Lane, I keep expecting to see him hanging from a rope or perhaps overdosed in his office.
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Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce is going down....
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Lets not forget that Don wanted Sal to prosuited for the man at lucky strike, so Don doesn't have that many PRINCIPLIES. Than he fired Sal for it.
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This episode had me on the edge of my seat the whole time. My only real complaint is I really wish Roger had stood up for Joan. I really wanted to finally see him be the better man for her.
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Wow.. that was definitely the best episode so far this season. Peggy is leaving and good for her but sure I hope to see her in the next season.



Pete and his "act of desperation" :D and Lane with his "You what!?".



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Geez Mad Men, this was some heavy stuff! This was some of the most painful, repulsive moments ever committed to screen. Now we have four partners who may never be likeable again. This is a huge moment for the show.
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The part with Joan was uncomfortable to watch indeed... but it was a choice she made, whoring herself for the good of the company and ultimately for her benefit. I actually liked Lane until these last few episodes, but the way he manipulated Joan was simply disgusting!



But the Peggy situation... it just broke my heart! I saw Don extremely angry at her for abandoning him (to add insult to injury she joined Ted Clough) so at first I believed he would not shake her hand. But when he took it and kissed it... You could feel his pain and hers too.



Scenes like this one are what make the show great... When they open up to each other (granted, sometimes it takes some alcohol and/or drugs to get there) you really get a feeling that you are understanding those characters better. And for me personally, this is a main ingredient in a good show.
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"The degradation of Joan Harris might just be one of the most unsettling and certainly upsetting scenes in Mad Men history." How was this more disturbing than Joan getting raped by her fianc??? I think the fact that she married the creep anyway is even sadder than her sleeping with Herb for the partnership.



In my opinion she married a rapist because she didn't really feel like she had a choice, but she *chose* to secure herself a position of power at SCDP. Yes, it probably was at a staggering cost to her self-esteem, but again I feel that her marrying Greg after what he did to her already was her self-esteem at its lowest - so from this point on I believe it can only go up...
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Pretty good point. I just hope that her 5% stake in the company doesn't end up being worthless when Lane's embezzlement is discovered.
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Lane being busted can only mean good things for Joan. Once he's fired who do you think is going to replace him?
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If the company survives you're right... but what if he brings down the ship in the process? Then we might be looking at an entirely new agency. Sterling Draper Campbell Holloway? (Considering Cooper's office has moved to the men's room, I'd be surprised if they continued to keep him around)
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I think you (MaryAnn) didn't catch the significance of Joan whoring herself for the company right the same time as Peggy was leaving it. Did you happen to catch the smile Joan secretly shot to Peggy as she was leaving? I think that was a gesture done out of respect. Joan, despite being strong and smart, will always be loyal to that company. She's like the ultimate go-to person, that whenever there's something that needs to be done albeit dirty or otherwise, she's going do it (if she can of course), and in the end it may wind up being her downfall. Peggy is more like the modern day woman set back in the 60's. After Don pretty much embarrassed her by throwing that money in her face (similar to a prostitute), she packed her sh!t and she cut out, something Joan wouldn't have done. I think that's the main point of this episode. Now whether or not she'll be back or if it was the right move remains to be seen.
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Not surprised Joan went along with everything. I cant wait for Roger/Joan squabble at partner meetings.
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This review totally missed the point of this episode.
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I intended to elaborate on what I said above earlier, so I will come back and do it now.



It seems that MaryAnn was pretty steamed about the way the women were perceived in this episode, and rightly so, to a certain degree. I, too, found it uncomfortable for Joan to be used in such a derogatory manner, but Joan also made her own choice in the end. What I found most unnerving was Lane's blatant lying to Joan, which played the biggest role in her making the decision she made. Lane knows how bad SCDP is doing financially, and that 5% stake may be worthless to Joan in the end. But, to cover his tracks, Lane once again compounds the problem at SCDP instead of facing it head on.



I felt Peter wasn't anymore evil than the rest of the men, except for Don. Peter was his usual measly self, trying to get ahead and play the genius when he is strictly just a pawn. Lane was the real mastermind behind Joan accepting the offer, and what of Joan herself? I felt all of the characters displayed disgusting character in this episode, again, except for Don.



For example, Peggy went behind Don's back and totally abandoned him when he clearly confessed his admiration for her and even offered her more money. Despite his lack of acknowledgement, Don was the man who took a huge gamble on Peggy by making her a copywriter in the beginning. Whatever Peggy's assumed reasons are, she is still letting her ego and pride obstruct her sense of right and wrong. Furthermore, Joan accepted payment in return for her morals. Regardless of the temptations, she still made the decision on her own.



I think this episode was meant to show everyone's lack of character in desperate situations, or situations that they perceive to be desperate. I saw this hour of Mad Men to be a foreshadowing event of what is going to happen to SCDP. As I stated before, the death this season will be SCDP, the company it self. Don will be left to save this sinking ship somehow. This episode only cemented my belief in that scenario.
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Interesting theory about the agency. I'll have to think about that some more. My money was on Pete turning into a serial killer.



You are giving Pete way too easy a pass. His weaselly self reached new lows in the episode. It was his web of half-truths that provided the fertile ground for Lane's bombshell implication that all the partners wanted Joan to do it.



Pete was the one in the original partners' meeting who willfully ignored Joan's clear offense and sarcasm in their conversation by relaying in a matter-of-fact voice that Joan felt they "couldn't afford her." The skeevy partners began readjusting their views of Joan at that point. If she was willing, no matter how distasteful a prospect this was, then why not consider it? Why not come up with a number she couldn't refuse? Even so, the last thing Cooper told Pete was to be sure and let Joan know that she didn't have to do this. Pete did not relay that message.



Then there is Lane, who delivered his own death blow (figuratively or in reality, we'll see) by not giving Joan the whole story. That is, when she protested that the partners had been discussing her and her willingness to prostitute herself, he didn't relate any of the events or nuances in the room such as Don storming out or that everybody was uncomfortable with the concept except for Pete the Mastermind. Ironically, Lane's bonus would have been more secure if he had followed his initial conscience instead of maneuvering to keep it safe (if SCDP lost the account, as Pete predicted they would without Joan's services, the bonus would have been his to keep). I truly believe part of Joan's accession was fed by the betrayal of the partners in standing up for her -- Roger especially, because of their former relationship and that she's the mother of his child. Remember, she specifically asked if Roger was on board with the event.



Don could have changed the course, as well, but he washed his hands of the whole mess. Even after his own experience at Pete's hands, and knowing the lengths to which Pete will go to achieve his own ends, didn't follow up with the other partners to find out what happened after he left. He also could have gone directly to Joan to express the sentiment he said so eloquently in her apartment when it was too late. It was the same thing he said to Pete in the meeting, and since he knew Joan had already been broached about the subject it wasn't any less offensive to tackle it directly with her.



So, no one comes off good in the episode, but Pete was the most evil of all of the men. He even timed telling Don until it was too late to stop the hook-up. The fact that no one was willing to do the dirty work except him, meant he controlled all the elements and could do and say as he wished to achieve his goal. The only piece for which he didn't account was Lane, and that would have been a game changer except for the bonus situation.
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I actually think Don didn't do anything more about the discussion of an offer to Joan because in his mind, once he said no and walked out the door, the discussion was over. It wasn't until he found out that they were offering her a 5% stake in the company that he went over to her apartment to tell her not to do it, not knowing that he was already too late.
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i looooooovvvedddddddd this episode, my best ever
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BTW... anyone else think this is slowly becoming the best Mad Men season so far?! I already loved season 4, but -aside from my darkest fear of peggy being a goner which, story-wise, is genius too - I think this season is simply spectacular.
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This is not the first Mad Men recap i have read this season, and I have to say that in my opinion you don't analise this show as deeply as it deserves.

You describe the plot points of this show almost as if they belonged to a soap opera, when there is so much meaning to almost every scene in the show.

If you watch Mad Men in a shallow and superficial sort of way, the show turns out to be boring.

If you, for example, try to find the relation between the Joan's story in this episode and the work they did for Jaguar ("At last, something beautiful you can truly own"), and analyse the position and behavior of all the characters involved in a more serious way, this recap would turn out much better and much more interesting.

And this week, the fact that you gave the tiny amount of importance to a single mocking sentence to the last scene between Don a Peggy, only helps to prove my point. It was one of the most important scenes of all the history of the show, and both actors gave excellent performances. The feelings in that scene, pain, sadness, respect, anger... Bah, you could write another recap about it. Elisabeth Moss shed REAL TEARS during that scene, and what do you do about it? Oh you, write a sentence. Pfffffff



So please, give it more time and more thinking when you write about this.



PS: Im portuguese, sorry for the english.
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I agree, especially about the line "Oh, and Peggy quit her job to go work for Cutler, Gleason, and Chough because she was feeling neglected or something. She'll be back. Probably."



Its a disservice to how major Peggy is, what a major moment for her and Don it is and how well Elisabeth Moss plays her.



This reviewer has gone way over the top on the Joan part of the story and this review seems to be mostly about shaming the various male characters who were involved (this is important but shouldn't be the focus of the review, any person with a bit of morality knows what they did was wrong yet the point is laboured throughout this review for too long).
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I really liked the line that began "Oh, and Peggy quit her job..." IMO, it was very clever. The review was very well written by MaryAnn.
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well i understand focusing on Joan maily b/c her story was the A storyline for the episode. BUT Peggy leaving diservse some discussion, especially if you consider what has happened to her throughout theseries and also this season.

Aslo the reveiwer should have talked about the title of the episode. because that stands some importance to the episode both figurativly and literally.
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I agree. Joan has merely proven that she's about as moral as the men of the company, meaning not at all. she proved that she belongs, in a weird, mad men kind of way, and it will probably undermine her standing at first, but help her gain influence in the end. her scenes were great, yes, but FAAAAR less influential, important or grand than peggy's story, which (frankly, in addition to the whole joan thing) puts everything at SCDP at risk - at least when you've watched the preview snippets. I HIGHLY doubt that peggy will be back. she's a gamer, she'll very likely succeed, and at this point it's more likely that don and peggy start their own company (wtf...) than that she will be back just like that. I hope it will become a "more money plus partnership etc in 1967" scenario, like WaltGekko suggested. but to brush it off like MaryAnn did in this post... hardly does the possible importance of this scene justice. sadly enough: after Omar Little, Stringer Bell and Jimmy Darmody, main characters just aren't safe these days anymore!^^
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You don't know what you got until you lose it. That was what the final scene with Don and Peggy made me think about. Don has always taken Peggy for granted, even thinking he could just buy her off. But now that she left, he finally realizes exactly what he lost, and he was not happy about it. It was a touching moment and I can only hope Peggy won't be leaving the series.



As for the whole Joan thing, I think 'uncomfortable' covers it exactly. Will she be able to live with what she did? This has got to put an unfixable dent in her self esteem, and perhaps more important an unfixable dent in Don's admiration for Joan.



Scumbag Pete should really get a severe reality check. He has a gorgeous wife at home (gorgeous is a heavy understatement btw...), a kid, a nice home, and a very good paycheck...Pete has really morally strayed this season, and I can't imagine this season ending without him getting a severe beating or worse. He really needs to be put in his place. I actually started to like him last season (which was really hard because I was not a fan of his character in Angel at all), but this season has swept that all away.



Roger is a lost cause (professionally at least), and I think he knows it by now, he is certainly giving up a lot more easy by now. I can see this end in two ways: either he accepts this and jost goes with the motion, or he simply quits and immigrates to the Bahamas or something to enjoy the rest of his life.
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One of the best episodes of Mad Men ever,certainly the best of season 5 so far.

Poor Joan.I wonder if Don had talked to her before her meeting with the fat creep,would she have slept with him the Jaguar guy anyway.She probably wouldn't have done what she did if she knew Don was on her side beforehand.

I expected more of Roger.After this episode I almost hope they would kill off Pete.

I loved the final scene with Peggy looking back at the office ,smiling to herself and getting into the elevator and then The Kink's "You really got me" playing during the end credits.Awesome scene.This was the right decision for her ,she needs to try to make it on her own.If she had stayed in SCDP ,she would have always been in Don's shadow,no matter what.

What was the deal with the scene of Megan's audition?
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All I can say is, thank god we didn't see Betty this week! Loved the episode. :)
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I'm sort of surprised by this recap. While the Joan/Jaguar storyline was clearly the most titillating, to reduce the Peggy storyline to the following sentence seems like a glaring oversight: "Oh, and Peggy quit her job to go work for Cutler, Gleason, and Chough because she was feeling neglected or something."



Such a great performance by Moss in this episode and such a brilliant final scene between Peggy and Don. Whatever the final outcome (please don't leave us!), Peggy's resignation was a major turning point for a character who is arguably the second lead in the show.
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Yeah. Recap should shed some light on the relationship between Don and Peggy. In earlier seasons they stood for eachother. Peggy's pregnacy, ring a bell?
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agree...
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The Joan scenes were hard to watch. Not that they were badly written, it's just that I love Joan, and to see her go down such an immoral path, it was just hard to watch. That last scene between Peggy and Don was absolutely heartbreaking. When he went to kiss her hand I almost lost it. I can't help to wonder what she will be doing at the beginning of next season.
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I felt really bad for Joan. The partners put her in a terrible position with the offer, Lane lied about why he wanted her take a 5% stake in the company instead of the cash, Roger didn't stand up for her and Don was too late with his protests. At least Joan is a voting partner now and her future is seemingly secure.



As for Don having PRINCIPLES... maybe, maybe not. I think he has a deep respect for Joan as a self-made woman doing it on her own and didn't want to see that change. However (and more importantly) Don wants to win the business, especially their first "car", on the merits of his own work - not because the redhead sealed the deal before the meeting ever took place. In Don's world, there's no joy unless he championed the cause and reaped all the glory.



I wasn't surprised that Peggy left after Don threw money in her face. That's about as disrespectful as you can get. Even so, it was gripping when she was trying to tell Don that she was moving on. I half expected her to entertain a counter-offer, just to see what she could get out of him, but she stuck to her guns and moved on. As much as I hated to see it, good for her. But, come on.... this is Peggy! She can't really be gone for good, right? Some how, some way, she'll be back. Either Don will try to win her back or she'll be completely miserable on the other side and beg back. Maybe not this season, but she'll be back.



I actually like the give and take between Megan and Don, and I think he does too. He's used to having his way and telling everyone else how high to jump. She doesn't let him get away with that. And they always seem to circle back around after a fight for their calmer discussions and mea culpas. Abandonment plays huge in Don's emotion reactions, so Megan let him know that he'll always come first - but it will be with consequences.



Definitely add Lane to the death watch list (but I hope he finds a decent way out). Pete's such a slimeball, he could get murdered by several people. And don't forget, to change into those fancy PJ's by dinnertime, Trudy had to change out of the bathrobe she wears all day long. That's never good.



This episode had me completely engrossed. This season has felt, I don't know, off? somehow. But after this, I feel like everything is back to the way it should be. Not sure if that makes any sense?
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"Don Draper has PRINCIPLES" is another clever line.



TV reviews are not book reports, boys and girls.
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Linda, I didn't say it wasn't. I only capitalized "PRINCIPLES" as MaryAnn did for emphasis. I wasn't critiquing the way she wrote the review, I was simply giving a counterpoint on the topic of Don's motivations. Your scolding is misplaced here.
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Don't know what to make of Peggy's smile when entering the elevator... it could mean, she is happy she is gone, could also mean, she is happy that Don realizes he made a huge mistake by treating her like crap.
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Joan got her partnership the same way a lot of men do, except literally in her case. But wait--I didn't understand the two scenes with Draper at her apartment. Did she or didn't she? She must have because she had the opal, right?
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When we see the scene for the first time we don't realize that Don is too late to stop Joan from following through with it because she doesn't let on to Don that the act already occurred. The second time we see the scene it reveals the timeline, as well as serving the purpose of separating Don from the rest of the partners in Joan's eyes.
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the scenes wern't shown linearly. So Don told her not to go through with it after it had already happened. She only found out after the fact that Don was the only one of the partners against it. If i remember correctly they shot it as Don's day followed by how Joan's. Yeah i kind of dont like it when they show scenes out of order like that.
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I've never liked Joan and found the whole thing disgusting. I wonder if the rest of the company will find out how she managed to become a partner. If they do find out I can't imagine anyone having any respect for her. Peggy will be a thorn in SCDP side next season as they battle it out for clients. Then the season after that we will see Peggy back at SCDP as a partner. She's been too important to the show to have her gone for forever.
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How can you dislike Joan?!



But I do love your idea for Peggy. It would be a shame if she's written off the show.
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That would make sense for Peggy, or as I said in my reply, Don comes back with a mega offer (for 1967) of $25-28,000 a year and a major promotion to keep her at SCDP. I would also write it where Don begins to realize there will come a day where women could very well be ruling advertising, and in fact, if I ever got to do a spinoff, I would set it in 1990 with a 35 year old Sally (Don's daughter) and 51 year old Peggy the faces of the firm with Don and Pete (Don at 65 and Pete in his 50s) more in the background.
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What will be interesting to see is how much Lane's embezzling from the last episode catches up to SCDP, and how that affects Jaguar and the firm.



I would not be shocked if we saw Don blow away Peggy with an offer and major promotion above what she got from the firm she was bolting to (maybe to a salary of around $25-28,000 a year, which in 1967 would have been a huge amount for anyone at a time when many people still made less than $100 a week/$5,000 a year).



One thing I wished they have been doing during this series was including the occasional aircheck of 77 WABC,. the legendary radio station in New York from 1960-'82 during its "Musicradio" heyday, especially in the '60s (WABC is widely considered to be the greatest radio station of all time). I know that's one thing I would have tried to get permission to regularly include.



What also will be interesting is if Mad Men gets to a seventh and eighth season, we are likely looking at the show actually getting into the '70s and the issues of that time. You have to wonder how much those issues would affect a firm like SCDP.
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I think one thing that should be mentioned is the way the main female characters were objectified in this episode. Joan sleeping with the Jaguar guy, Megan having to turn around for the men she was auditioning for, and Don throwing money at Peggy's face in his office. Also, Megan's friend doing that crawl on the table for the guys in the conference room.



Also, speaking of Jaguar, what do they think of what is going on in this show? The guys at SCDP kept mentioning how unreliable their cars are and now in this episode one of their employees demands to have one of the ad firm's secretaries sleep with him in order to help the firm's cause to be hired.
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I dont know about now but Jaguars were known to break down all the time and thats why Bert Cooper keeps mentioning it... even in the 1974 movie The Gumball Rally one of the running jokes is that one of the teams cant pass the starting line of the race b/c their Jaguar wont start. However the point in getting Jaguar as one of their clients is that only good agencies handle car advertising, so getting a car will "put them on the map" and help with buisness.

Although these women were "objectified" (i dont think what happened to Peggy would count) you forgot to see that they all ended up on top in the end. Joan ended up gaining power in the company and owning a share in it, Peggy became more powerful by standing up for herself and leaving (and at the same time entering a better postition with a raise) and Megan.... um wow i cant remember what happened to her in the end
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"Also, speaking of Jaguar, what do they think of what is going on in this show?" oh wait where you talking about the company? They prob dont care and prob gave permission for their product to be on the show, its a good form of advertising. ^as for them not running read above post^
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Agreed. @JaguarUSA's tweet after the show: "Loved the pitch, didn't love the process. We applaud Peggy leaving SCDP."
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I think the problem with Pete is that he constantly wants things that he cant have... Hes like a big child, he only wants something that he cant have or that someone else has.

idk what to think of Joans situation. out of all the characters on the show I've always felt kind of sorry for her. Even though she has so much power over people (i think alot of that is b/c she actually knows what everybody does in the office), they still dont really give her the respect she diserves.

I have to admit that part way through this episode i was guessing that the guy from Jaguar was actually talking about Megan's friend (who is also a redhead) instead of Joan. I think i was guessing that b/c i didnt want to see Joan sell her self out like that.. and also due to the fact that the title of the episode was "the Other Woman" but then that would be to obvious. But at least Joan owns 5% of SCDP now, so good for her?
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The problem with Pete is that, yes, he wants things he can't have, but he doesn't understand why he doesn't get them. In his world he's the hero, and he will never comprehend why everyone else doesn't hold him in the same esteem.
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I can't wait for his eventuall fall. And I hope it's much more spectacular than simply being punched out by Lane...
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I completely agree. The problem is that he's so effective in this role of Machiavellian player, that I can see them allowing his manipulations to take him to the top of the agency. Of course, a fall from that position would be even more dramatic, but the wait for his comeuppance would seem like forever.
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i just cant wait till Trudy finds out... she'll prob kill him
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