Marvel's Jessica Jones Season 1 Review: Introducing Marvel's Most Terrifying Villain Yet

Marvel's Jessica Jones S01E08, S01E09, S01E10, S01E11, S01E12, S01E13: "AKA WWJD", "AKA Sin Bin", "AKA 1,000 Cuts", "AKA I've Got the Blues", "AKA Take a Bloody Number", "AKA Smile"

Editor's Note: This review covers Episodes 8-13 of Marvel's Jessica Jones and includes spoilers. If you're looking for the review of Episodes 1-7, it can be found here.


The Netflix and Amazon distribution model of releasing entire seasons at once makes determining the best way to cover shows like Marvel's Jessica Jones a constant struggle. The influence of DVRs on our lives means that we can all watch TV on our own time, when it suits us, but there is still some semblance of a schedule regarding traditional TV. Releasing an episode a week, whether or not that's how an individual consumes a show, allows for an episode to have a clear beginning, middle, and end. It also allows time for proper reflection that the all-at-once model simply does not. Some people probably watched Marvel's Jessica Jones in a matter of days while some may still be working their way through its deeply dark and disturbing subject matter two weeks later, and so the question becomes how does one cover it in a way that pleases everyone? The answer is that you can't. 

However, the bigger problem is one that is born from the creative process, and it's not limited to just Marvel's Jessica Jones, though it is probably more noticeable here than it was in some of Netflix's or Amazon's other streaming originals. To put it bluntly: Marvel's Jessica Jones as an episodic show does not exist; it was written like a 13-hour movie, but no one would watch a 13-hour movie, so it's broken up into binge-able chapters like a novel, with each one building slowly upon the last but none being able to exist on their own. And so if there's a flaw in what is otherwise an extraordinary look at abuse and surviving, it's the show's structure. And so the question becomes: does that matter? 

Well, it depends on how you personally watch and grade television. Marvel's Jessica Jones is the best show Marvel has produced yet, but for traditionalists who want to dissect each hour as its own compact story and how that story fits within the larger narrative, it was likely frustrating to watch since the episodes didn't always have the structure required for that kind of viewing. For reviewing purposes, its format means we must look at the product as the sum of its parts, rather than what each of those parts mean individually, which is wholly different from what we're doing everywhere else in TV criticism. Neither way is more right or more wrong than the other, it's just a symptom of the changing landscape of how we watch and create television. And so that's why we've reviewed the show in two halves and not 13 separate parts.

As a whole, Marvel's Jessica Jones is a sometimes slow but engaging and satisfying drama about Krysten Ritter's titular superhero—someone who'd never consider herself a superhero—facing down her demons and eventually delivering a knock out punch in Round 13. But when episodes are viewed individually and their merits are weighed as such, it becomes somewhat weaker, especially when you look at Episodes 8, 9, and even 10 ("AKA WWJD," "AKA Sin Bin," and "AKA 1,000 Cuts") in comparison to some of the earlier episodes. Putting Jessica and Kilgrave in the same room upped the stakes dramatically, while the show's exploration of Kilgrave's backstory, including how he came to have his powers, his parents' involvement in creating them, and the fact that his power is actually a virus, made those episodes the most captivating hours of the show's first season. It was not simply because they prominently featured David Tennant's villain, who may be Marvel's best villain yet, but because they had a real structure around which the story was built. It doesn't necessarily make the episodes that came before less worthy but it does make the episodes featuring his backstory stand out more when you look at the episodes next to each other. And to go one step further, they are also probably the few episodes that could have stood on their own in the more traditional sense. 

Which leads to another related issue: the pacing. Jessica Jones could have benefited from a 10-episode season rather than 13; It would have made the show feel a little tighter in spots, which would have led to fewer complaints about the slow build of the earlier episodes. An alternative would have been to use a few of those episodes to tell stand-alone stories involving Jessica taking on cases unrelated to Kilgrave in an effort to build out the world the show inhabits while also allowing viewers some time to breathe. Jessica's obsession with finding and punishing Kilgrave was as all-consuming as his obsession with making her love him; it's not hard to see how some might find that a little suffocating. 


Even still, the show's final six episodes covering Kilgrave's backstory, Jessica tracking down his parents, his attempts to expand and increase his powers in a hope to once again ensnare Jessica, all the while still finding time for a slight detour into Trish and Jessica taking on Simpson, were rightfully more invigorating than the previous seven, and they paid off on all the groundwork that had been laid. Together, they told one woman's journey of abuse without feeling the need to showcase that abuse. It showed her confronting her attacker and rapist and shutting down his excuses and explanations for why what he did was seemingly okay. The show never once let Kilgrave off the hook. It never once let itself off the hook. The season was never going to end any other way other than with Kilgrave's death and Jessica being the one person to end it all, but on the way it gave strength to voices that are often drowned out: those of the victims. 

And the fact that Jessica was a victim made her story incredibly personal and allowed it to resonate on a number of levels. This wasn't the Avengers fighting Loki to save Earth from invading Chitauri. It wasn't even Daredevil fighting Wilson Fisk to stop further corruption in Hell's Kitchen. This was Jessica fighting to regain both her sanity and her agency after having it violently stripped away by a mad man who couldn't even admit that what he'd done was rape. Her passion to see him stopped came from a very real, very raw place and although Kilgrave could no longer control her, he still had the upper hand in their twisted relationship, which was evident after she successfully captured him and held him in the hermetically sealed room and he still was able to manipulate her and get under her skin. The moment that Jessica realized she was a free woman, and the moment that we realized it again in the finale, were the two most powerful moments in the entire series. The first scene because it was the first moment Jessica really realized that she could win, and the second because she finally had. The fact that stopping Kilgrave would also benefit the people of New York and beyond was what gave her the strength to keep going even after his long con with Luke Cage nearly destroyed her. You can't really call it a bonus or a side effect, because Jessica was always thinking of the bigger picture, always thinking of how stopping him would benefit her but also everyone else. That's why it was only after Hope killed herself that Jessica was really able to commit to killing him and not just capturing him and getting him to confess to all of his crimes.


Small pacing issues aside, the show's first season was nothing short of spectacular. It introduced us to a kickass female superhero, it gave a voice to the voiceless, and it fixed Marvel's villain problem. Prior to learning his backstory, Tennant's Kilgrave was already a fascinating presence in both Jessica's life and in the show's larger picture, but it's worth discussing the fact that even after learning his backstory, even after giving him the depth that so many Marvel villains lack, he was still not sympathetic. At one point, after Jessica agreed to join Kilgrave at her fully restored childhood home—the home she lived in with her family prior to their deaths in the accident that gave Jessica her powers—she showed Kilgrave what it could be like to use his powers for good. And given Tennant's natural charisma and television's obsession with redemption, it'd be easy to see how one might have been tempted to try to redeem Kilgrave, rehabilitate him, or even forgive him, but you cannot redeem a man like Kilgrave and you cannot ignore his sins. 

After learning about his history as Kevin, we better understood Kilgrave and his motivations, and we were confronted with the complication of his skewed perception of the world, one in which he struggled to know and understand if people were doing things because they wanted to or because he told them to. But in the end he was still a sadistic murderer and rapist, one who made excuses for his actions and who didn't—couldn't—understand why someone like Jessica would not react warmly to him. And he was made all the more sinister when he chose to exact revenge on his parents, people who, as it turns out, were trying to save his life when they subjected him to the experiments that gave him his power and who, despite what he said, only abandoned him after they spent time trying to help him and he terrorized them. Add in the way he always built in fail safes—usually having innocent humans harming one another or each other in order to get Jessica to comply with his demands—and the way he played with Luke in Episode 12 which culminated in a major fight scene between Jessica and Luke and you've got one of the most terrifying villains Marvel has ever seen on screen. 

Tennant's presence in the first half of the season was minimal, which helped give Kilgrave an air of mystery and also heighten the terrifying effects of his powers. But once he stopped hiding in the shadows and the action revolved more directly around him and his plans for a life with Jessica, the story really took off. Tennant's performance in the back half of the season was slick and calculating, and although you would never call Kilgrave warm, his portrayal lit up every scene like a fire that had been doused with gasoline. Your eyes were drawn to him no matter what else was happening, and yet he was never bloated or overpowering the way Vincent D'Onofrio's Wilson Fisk was by the end of Daredevil. And in that regard, it's almost a shame that he had to die to be stopped. But villains like Kilgrave have an expiration date and he'd reached his. It's better that the series—and Jessica—realized that now rather than try to end it any other way.

Less terrifying and more confusing than Kilgrave was Wil Traval's Officer Simpson, a reinvented version of the supervillain Nuke who sometimes stalled the show's momentum with his own plans. His role became larger in the second half of the season as he grew wildly more unstable and the show introduced the character's pills from the comics that increased or decreased different effects on his body. The red pills increased adrenaline, blue were meant to bring him down, and white were meant to balance him out in between, but he never came down. His own single-minded desire to take out Kilgrave led to complications that interfered with Jessica and Trish's plans, and eventually led to him attacking them both. If that wasn't frustrating enough, he murdered Detective Clemons and he chewed capsule pills like they were Tums. That last one probably won't bother everyone but it was weird enough and happened frequent enough that it actually took me out of the action. 

Similarly, the amount of screentime given to Carrie-Anne Moss's Jeri Hogarth and her love triangle was disproportionate to my interest in it. Was she good? Yes. Was the scene involving 1,000 cuts frightening? Hell yes. Was it interesting to see her consider how much easier her life would be if she had powers like Kilgrave's? Oh my, yes. But was all of it worth it to detract from the rest of the action? Maybe not. Still, these minor issues aren't enough to bring down the show overall. They are but minor hiccups in an otherwise excellent addition to the Marvel repertoire. 

It's probably only a matter of time before Netflix announces that it has renewed Marvel's Jessica Jones for Season 2, especially since the show has planted the IGH breadcrumbs that would allow the show to dig into the how and why of Jessica's powers in a new season, but should Netflix renew the series? Before you pummel me into the floorboards, let me explain. If this show existed in vacuum, I would argue wholeheartedly for more time in Jessica Jones' world. I love a good noir and the arc of Rachael Taylor's Trish so pleasantly surprised me that I'm dying to see the show continue to build her out as a hero of her own. But I do wonder how a new season would intersect with and potentially affect the rest of Netflix's Marvel properties. 

Already on deck for 2016 is the second season of Marvel's Daredevil, which will feature both Elektra and the Punisher, as well as the first season of what I'm just going to assume will be called Marvel's Luke Cage. Then at some point there will be a series starring Iron Fist, followed by a Defenders series featuring all four characters. Where exactly does a second season of Marvel's Jessica Jones fit in that timeline since it is Netflix's objective to release two Marvel properties a year? How long would we have to wait? The potential for complication exists is all I'm saying, especially as the shows progress and potentially bleed over into one another. Right now the only real crossover that has happened between the shows has been the presence of Mike Colter's Luke Cage and Rosario Dawson's Claire Temple (who was in Marvel's Daredevil and will also appear in Luke Cage) despite the fact Matt Murdock (Charlie Cox) is actually Jessica's lawyer in the comics. Again, I will gladly absolutely return to watch Jessica take on whatever else comes her way when Netflix announces another season—the quality of the storytelling, the style and tone, and Jessica's cynical world view drew me in almost immediately—but it's just something to consider.



OBSERVATIONS FROM A STAKE OUT

– The show's credit sequence and its score are phenomenal and really set the the style, tone, and mood for the show. Right now Netflix is two-for-two on credit sequences, because Daredevil's was equally fitting.

– Robyn was by far the worst character I've seen on a TV show this fall. Actually, possibly this year. I can't even talk about her without flying into a blind rage so I won't.

– I can't be the only person who found themselves watching some of David Tennant's lighter Doctor Who episodes after marathoning Jessica Jones, right? I needed to make myself feel better about being drawn to him throughout the show. Mind you, I wasn't bothered by Tennant playing evil like some Whovians apparently were—his performance was brilliant and this certainly wasn't the first time he's brought a villain to life—but I did feel a bit dirty about loving his character so much. Also, was he just trolling us with his "weeeellll"or is that just a thing that Tennant does and I've never really noticed before now?

– "You're not 10 anymore." In my mind, I immediately jumped to Doctor Who. He's Ten! and based on the internet, many other viewers did too, but whether or not it was a purposeful reference to Who remains unclear. I'm almost leaning toward no, but who even knows.

– "Kilgrave? Talk about obvious. Was 'murdercorpse' already taken?"

– "You can't improve on an asshole by making it bigger." 


Comments (216)
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Apr 20, 2016
Very irritated that the reviewer addressed the way this is released as if this is the only netflix show that has been released this way. Sense8 was also released this way and is probably more like a movie in its structure than JJ. The reviewer might like to take this in to consideration when discussing the way in which netflix operates.
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Dec 17, 2015
Good but not the best Marvel series out there. Highly overrated.

What worked :
Kilgrave. Fantastic vilain, superb ability. Great acting.
Luke Cage

Mixed feelings :
Krysten Ritter's acting.

What didn't :
Pacing.
Jessica's limited abilities... Super strength? That's it?
Too much talking. Gets boring at times.
Missing the wow factor in superhero movies and series.
The thousand of times the name "Kilgrave" is heard all along.
Kilgrave and Jessica's many one on one encounters. Kill the guy godammit! Always having second thoughts.

Daredevil takes the crown for me.
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Dec 13, 2015
"I can't be the only person who found themselves watching some of David Tennant's lighter Doctor Who episodes after marathoning Jessica Jones, right?" Right!
"but I did feel a bit dirty about loving his character so much" Oh yes! :)
(And the "You are not ten anymore!" -joke was hilarious!!)
I loved Jessica Jones as a character, but David Tennant was so good that I didn't want Jessica to kill him... (I knew she had to, but still. I will miss him...)

One thing that no one mentions: Mike Colter played Lemond Bishop in The Good Wife. Bishop was a drug dealer who seemed sophisticated on the surface... but he was capable of killing his son's mother. And anyone else really. So for me it was pretty easy to like Tennant after Doctor Who, but pretty hard to like Mike Colter after The Good Wife!

Maybe next season we get something more (intellectual) from Luke, not just naked body/sex/skin scenes or "you were inside me!!!" -speeches. Then - I guess - I will love him, too :)
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Dec 11, 2015
I only know it is exremely frustrating to just have seen episode 8 but NOT being able to read this review or ANY of the comments because there will be spoilers, and NOT being able to read a review of EACH episode, analysing each episode in detail. SO frustrating! So many feelings, thoughts, ideas... and NO ONE to share them with, until I've seen them all. But by then I will have forgotten what upset me most with each individual episode, or what I liked most with each episode...
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Dec 06, 2015
I so much agree with this "the show's first season was nothing short of spectacular"
I did not feel the show was slow, but intense. Officer Simpson was not necessary,
Now that Doctor Who is finished I am going to re-watch the David Tennant series, of course. But I also recommend the UK version of Broadchurch, also on Netflix.
If we get a second season I will be happy, but I won't complain if we only get the one first season. I'll re-watch it in few months.

Krysten Ritter has gone a long way from being the heroin addicted girlfriend of Jesse in Breaking Bad. She is really a talent.

Jessica Jones is without a doubt the best TV show I have seen in the last 7 or 8 months.
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Dec 06, 2015
I also like to think this was an intentional reference:


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Dec 06, 2015
Does the entire (netflix) Marvel Universe take place in a dive bar?
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Dec 06, 2015
"You're not 10 anymore."

Yes but never mind that... just fifteen minutes later or so it becomes apparent that he's said "Don't Blink!" to those two houseslaves off-camera while Jessica was out shopping for drugged Chinese. :D :D :D
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Dec 05, 2015

I really liked the show but felt like Killgrave's ending was done poorly. It was far too obvious and lacked dramatic flair with him simply being picked up and having his neck twisted... We all knew she wasn't controlled, they could have done a better job with that and building up such a vicious character to only have him die so basic was dissapointing. Still loved the show as a whole though.
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Dec 08, 2015
I understand what you're saying, I was confused because I thought from the start that she wasnt controlled
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Dec 05, 2015
Oh I just realized that I not likely to see a Defender series from the comments below. I really though all 4 superheroes would combined and appear in one series.I thought that was the whole point.

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Dec 05, 2015
I'm not sure which comments you're referring to, but the Defenders is most definitely the eventual big crossover, because, you're right. That IS the whole point of making a Defenders series.
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Dec 06, 2015
Great I am so glad there will be one.
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Dec 05, 2015
I love it even more than Daredevil. Killgrave is a very interesting villain and David Tennant is just awesome. The scene where Jessica locked up killgrave and brought his parents was the highlight for me. I'll probably remember it forever just like Walter White blowing up someones face.

I can't wait to see the defenders series. I'm confident it should be good.
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Dec 05, 2015
To everyone who is complaining about Jessica's failure to stop Kilgrave too many times. She failed so many times because she needed to bring him in alive to free Hope of murder charges and because when fighting people under Kilgrave's control she couldn't exactly fight to kill. Kilgrave had a strong advantage until he didn't. Until the gloves got taken off and Jessica stop needing to bring him in alive.
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Dec 05, 2015
I loved this show I couldn't stop watching it and I fend up thinking "I want more" I don't care how it would come together with other shows I want more Jessica Jones
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Dec 05, 2015
I liked Jessica Jones a lot, but I didn't think it was the best Marvel show to date. I liked Daredevil more. With JJ, I found myself getting annoyed by the way the show kept re-using the sequence of almost catching Kigrave, then losing him, then catching him, then losing him, then catching up to him and losing him again some more. It happened over and over and over, until I found myself almost getting angry at the way they kept trying to do the same thing(catch him in a public place) and repeatedly suffered the same results(had bystanders and crowds used against them). This annoyance somewhat tarnished the show for me.

On many other levels, though, I loved the show; especially the emotional impact it made, more than once.
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Dec 05, 2015
I absolutely love this show. I did find the pacing getting a little off-track around episode 10, but other than that; I love everything about Jessica Jones...even Jessica herself - although she's prickly. :)
The only idea I wish they would've explored more is exactly how Jessica became/becomes immune to Kilgrave's control. I assume it has something to do with his abilities actually being a virus; but I felt like that bit was glossed over, and I was left confused.
David Tennant plays Kilgrave so fantastically! I would love to see a second season, but with Kilgrave gone...what's next for Jessica, now? I do agree that it'd be a couple steps in the wrong direction, to follow such a glorious debut season up with a "regular PI" noir-type season...(as much as I love my Veronica Mars, I must say, I think JJ is darker, and can pull off more mature storylines...) but I guess we'll just have to see.
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Dec 05, 2015
I can't sing the praises of Jessica Jones enough (in spite of the fact that I found the first half a bit too slow of a burn). I absolutely loved it! Since the series has already been commented on at length in the comments, I'll just note/reiterate that I was thrilled to see a show in this genre that has so many female characters in the spotlight who are simultaneously strong and deeply flawed -- complex. Storytelling is awash with cranky, broody, (often) unapologetic, misbehavin' rogue male protagonists. How refreshing to see the screen full of key female characters in a similar vein! Overall, a superb series.
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Dec 05, 2015
Thanos with the Infinity Gauntlet and all the gems is a much more terriying villain...
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Dec 05, 2015
To each their own & all that but what makes Kilgrave a much more terrifying villain over Thanos & his props, is that Kilgrave's villainy is based on reality...There are people out in the world that are truly sick in the head like that character & it's the portrayal of that deformed humanity that is so chilling on an instinctual level.

Thanos at best won't be able to strike that kind of primal chord in people. Too many comic book levels of disbelief have to be suspended by people in order for him to compete in the same league.
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Dec 05, 2015
In my opinion, the show suffered one major problem. The whole time I'm thinking to myself "Where the hell is SHIELD?" Their job is to find and stop guys like Kilgrave, and Kilgrave certainly wasn't making himself hard to find. A drone with a gun is all it would take to put him down. So in a vacuum, yes Kilgave could have been Marvel's most terrifying villain, but they put him in a universe where he shouldn't have been able to last five seconds and just asked us to selectively forget everything we're not seeing on the screen. One not so major problem, this is Marvel's second female superhero series and once again the villain has mind control power. Mix it up a little Marvel.

I agree, Robyn was the worst.

P.S. The technology to record TV shows and watch them at our convenience has existed for forty years, the DVR changed nothing. The only difference is that now the network's are able to know when people are watching shows after they air. People's viewing habits haven't changed in the slightest.
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Dec 05, 2015
Viewing habits have absolutely changed and if you think recording via VCR for watching later was a truly common practice by our society as a whole 40 years ago, even 15 years ago, you're mistaken. And people certainly weren't using three different VCRs to record different shows at the same time to watch them later. It just didn't happen.
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Dec 05, 2015
I never could understand why it's so important for Marvel to have all their stories exist in the same universe.
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Dec 05, 2015
1. It's a fantastic marketing strategy for the comic books. If you want Spider-Man readers to start buying Daredevil comics, just have Daredevil team up with Spider-Man in a Spider-Man comic.

2. It's easier for the writers. They don't have to think of a new villain as often. Just borrow one from another comic.

3. Kids are easy to please. Having a hero or villain that they recognize from another comic show up for an episode may be enough to give them a nerdgasm. The guest characters don't even have to do anything interesting. They just have to show up.
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Dec 05, 2015
IOW, it's all about the money.
Just like everything else.
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Dec 05, 2015
To be perfectly honest, I think Jessica Jones kind of killed off their potential for a reasonable Season 2.

I mean, so much of what the show was about was all that psychological terror of seeing people do things to themselves and others without any control and that it could happen at any time. A new season lacking that suspense simply won't feel like the same show no matter what story they give her. It would be a step back to simply have a season where she's just a PI doing her thing.

Without Kilgrave, even if they try to focus on Simpson as the threat I think they are better off leaving Jessica Jones as a one-off, unless they do something drastic to the character at some point. However, all is not lost. Because of the great groundwork they laid with several characters, I think it would be a much better idea instead to do a season called Hellcat, and focus on Trish either getting more power somehow, or training herself more to become the hero she so desperately wants to be. Then Jessica can show up just as often as Trish did in JJ Season 1 (which was basically every episode) and even have her own ongoing B-plot storylines that either tie in, or possibly establish her new found freedom in order to make the transition to a non-Kilgrave JJ Season 2, an easier one.
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Dec 05, 2015
If Whovian's can't handle Tennant playing a bad guy, better tell them to avoid "Goblet of Fire".
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Dec 05, 2015
That was the first thing I thought of when I heard he was cast as Kilgrave, but he also wasn't a huge presence in Goblet of Fire because of the Polyjuice potion. Which I think was kind of a shame, especially now.
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Dec 05, 2015
I got bored with its pilot episode. Did it get better?
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Dec 05, 2015
The pace did pick up bit it's not the typical superhero show and one reason why not I love it.
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Dec 05, 2015
No. If you didn't like the pilot, you probably won't like the rest. (I liked the pilot AND the rest).
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Dec 06, 2015
Thanks. It was too slow for my taste. :(
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Dec 05, 2015
It would have been cool if the heroin that Malcolm was using was the heroin from daredevil. That would have been a cool little Easter egg to tie the shows together in a city/neighborhood way.
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Dec 05, 2015
I loved this show. My only major complain was about Simpson. I didn't like his plot at all.
Also, Kaitlin, the concept of a long movie broken in parts is almost as old as TV, not a fancy Netflix idea. It's called "miniseries". It is true that Netflix puts all the episodes on screen at the same time, but nothing else.
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Dec 05, 2015
I never claimed Netflix invented something new.
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Dec 05, 2015
Not explicitly, but the beginning of your article sounded like "we on tv,com don't know what to do with this new format". Sorry if that was not your intention
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Dec 05, 2015
That was a pretty great show. I enjoyed it more than Daredevil though I'd understand how others would feel differently. I also agree with most of the issues the show had around the fringes. The Nuke guy was a little too cartoonish and annoying to be effective. And as for Robyn I mostly tuned out for her stuff.

But the show was masterful at building tension and telling a taut cat and mouse game over the 13 episodes while Killgrave continued to be the most disturbing and effective Marvel villain I've seen.

Looking towards a second season, if it happens I don't see how it could be as good as this, not with how Killgrave had such a personal history with Jessica. I don't know what they did in the comics beyond The Purple Man, whether they managed to come up with other big bads that were also tied to Jessica's psyche. Maybe the comic readers could help out. I would like the show to maintain the personal, and psychologically damaging connection between Jessica and the baddies, but even so I think they'll struggle to top Season 1.

If it is renewed I don't buy that they'll only release two Marvel seasons a year, I think we'll get it in a timely fashion.
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Dec 05, 2015
I think they did Robyn's character one great disservice. They heavily implied that there was a sexual (meaning incestual) relationship going on between her and Randy. While it certainly explained some of their quirk, it made neither of them all that likeable initially, and made Randy's death much less impactful than it could have been.

If they had simply just made her the crazy over-protective twin sister, it would have made her a lot more sympathetic, even when she was in full bitch mode. Actually, almost all of her dialogue and actions could have been exactly the same once Randy was killed. She played crazy over-protective sister to a tee. It was just so hard to see her as a victim initially because it was assumed that what she was doing to Randy wasn't much short of what Kilgrave had done to Jessica. Unfortunately, that did a great disservice to Robyn because it was clear that there was real love there for Randy, and she even came around to seeing her own guilt in it by the end. While it was cheesy to have the little service at the river, when taken as a loving sister getting closure, it becomes much more touching than when it is simply brother-raper coming to know the truth.
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Dec 05, 2015
I didn't mind Robyn - her crying about not knowing Randy's whereabouts was a pretty heartbreaking moment. After she found out he was dead the anger was very understandable, and the progress of her relationship with Malcolm was kinda interesting.
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Dec 05, 2015
yeah her character is clearly a bit mental - but i had no problem with her at all.
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Dec 05, 2015
Can't really blame her for not getting on board with everyone else talking about being mind-controlled, while her brother's missing/dead.
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Dec 05, 2015
I think the thread concerning Robyn and her brother could've been tighter but I think that her character was wonderfully bizarre and over-the-top and the acting -- also terrific.
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Dec 04, 2015
I wouldn't mind another season of Jessica Jones. Like in the spring season. I like her and her teammates. Creator (Melissa Rosenberg, is it?) can return to Alias comics and construct 2d season as case by case story while digging deep into JJ backstory and making her fight some baddie like Simpson or his bosses (or JJ can fight Simpson's bosses in the first half of season and in the second half she can fight someone else intriguing enough).
Also best of Tennant you can see in 2 seasons of Broadchurch, imho.



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Dec 04, 2015
I'm two minded about this show it is a slow butn & yes I can see how you should watch a few eps at a time but not many people have the time to do that. I think you're right in saying it may have benefited from being 10 eps instead of 13. I too like Trish's character & want to see her development. Time will tell. David Tennant is an incredible actor to be both so loved as Doctor Who & creeped out as Kilgrave! I do find it difficult to watch him in this role but that is a good thing because he is doing his job as an actor. So creepy! You forget he was Doctor who while watching him till you think about ti and go Whoa!
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Dec 05, 2015
So far both Daredevil AND Jessica Jones both were 3-4 episodes too long. I hope they either start packing more substance into these series, or make better use of their initial 5 episodes in each series to give better background to the main and supporting characters. (Also, like others have pointed out, it might have been nice to see Jessica prove her PI mettle a bit more. After all, she was able to find Hope not because of great investigation skills, but simply because Kilgrave took her to all the same places Jessica had been taken to, which was on purpose)
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Dec 04, 2015
"...so it's broken up into binge-able chapters like a novel, with each one building slowly upon the last but none being able to exist on their own. And so if there's a flaw in what is otherwise an extraordinary look at abuse and surviving, it's the show's structure."
"An alternative would have been to use a few of those episodes to tell stand-alone stories..."
I completely disagree!
What you see as a flaw I see as an asset.
And thank god they spared us fillers like generic procedural stand-alone stories!
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Dec 05, 2015
Stand alone stories get a bed rap. They can be used very effectively for world building and to add depth to characters. They don't have to be "filler."
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Dec 04, 2015
I got sucked into the binge on this show more so than others. I was watching it on a Friday night. "It's only 11pm. One more then off to bed." Next thing I know it's 6am and I'm still thinking "One more..." but force myself to turn off the TV. And the tone was SO dark; it made Daredevil look like The Flash. Yet, I still couldn't look away.

One thing I have always liked about Marvel over DC is their villains. They're not simple, "I'm a bad person and want to take over the world" types. They have complex motivations like everyone else. "I was 10 having a tantrum" pretty much sums up Purple... I mean Killgrave (though I did appreciate the fact that he wore purple all the time). He's still 10, still having a tantrum, only problem is no one can discipline him. It's like asking: What if Superman had not been taught right from wrong, how would he have turned out? Oh, wait, Marvel already did that. He's called Hyperion.

I like how they've now intertwined all of the known characters now. Can't wait for Luke Cage to come out. He did a bang-up job. Also, the nurse from Daredevil was a nice touch.

About the only thing I didn't like was the lack of logic or common sense by a lot of the people. You KNOW what Killgrave was, yet you still though going to confront Jessica was a good idea!? Really!? Also didn't care much for the cop's story line either. If he is the villain in season 2 or the Defenders and dies, I might actually cheer.

Overall, a great show, can't wait for what comes next!
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Dec 04, 2015
I hope we don't have to wait years to see more of Jessica Jones. I'd rather we have more Jessica than a series about Luke Cage. I liked his character, and the actor was a good choice for him, but I just didn't find him interesting enough to want to watch more about his life. I'll still watch it, don't get me wrong, but would rather have more JJ. ;-)

Oh, also, agree, Robyn was the worst! I have never hated a character so much, so immediately, so I guess, good job writers and actor? Please never torment us with such an annoying character ever again though.
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Dec 05, 2015
I wholeheartedly agree with you. I liked Luke Cage, and I can see why they included him in Jessica's story so much...to solidify their relationship...but I still like Jessica more, as a character. She's so complex and she has such a tumultuous past behind her - I just want to see more about her, and be able to spend more time inside her head.
I like her commentary on the world, and on human tendencies in general - and I'm not sure I'd get a lot of that dry wit/caustic humor, with Luke Cage.
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Dec 04, 2015
One of my favorite moments death by a thousand cuts.

oh no Trinity. i mean Hogarth... That was a painful to watch. It seemed the scene was going on forever. Shouting at my screen. Run Run. Still think if she reacted a little faster she could have escaped. When somebody is under the influence of Kilgrave and is trying to hurt you you better run because you can't reason with them.

And what's with the Robyn hate? She was obviously mentally ill. Yes, her behavior was very annoying. I'm not denying that. People that are suffering from mental diseases are like that sometimes. I pitied her not hated her. It wasn't her fault she was sick. Probably just me.There is a lot of hate for people that are different or mentally ill. It's a damn shame but the human psyche works that way apparently.

You could argue that Kilgrave was also mentally ill but he was killing people and all kinds of other nasty stuff so he had to be stopped. Killing him was the only option.

Very good show and the re-"watchability" is very high. One of those shows you can watch over and over again without getting bored.

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Dec 04, 2015
This was a very well written and acted story. That being said, I wouldn't be hurt if Netflix DIDN'T make a second season of JJ.

Jessica is an integral part of the Luke Cage story. She, and her entire supporting cast could be blended into the new Cage series easily. With any luck, they will do that and leave out Iron Fist.

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Dec 04, 2015
While I'm sure Simpson is going to lead us to an interesting story, dear god his character was so annoying. It would have been more entertaining to watch an actual broken record than this stone faced actor turn up on screen looking stoned. He was good for two episodes but then acted like he was fresh on his first job ever.

David Tennant himself said that Killgrave was a character you could empathise with and tried to play him in that respect which is what made him all the more terrifying, because Tennant could have chemistry with a plain cheese sandwich and could have easily pulled viewers into sympathizing with him.

Unfortunately I don't think they'll be able to top Tennant's villain in the second season and it will fizzle out.
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Dec 04, 2015
I think the whole 2 a year thing is kind of ill conceived on their part. They could only introduce one new series a year, but if the others get more seasons, they wouldn't count against it. Daredevil premiered in April, Jessica Jones in November. Keep one of those in the original month, probably Daredevil since it was first and s2 is expected for April again, and then spread them out to one every 3 months with Luke Cage and Iron Fist premiering in either January or July. I would think The Defenders will be a one off, but if it's more it won't really be an every day thing and won't need to disrupt the other shows.
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Dec 05, 2015
I don't think that they are releasing only 2 a year. The plan was to launch 4 shows over 2 years: Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, and then The Defenders.
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Staff
Dec 04, 2015
Well, they're filming Luke Cage right now and Iron Fist hasn't even been cast, so that makes it very difficult to churn out a new season every three months. And Netflix has many other original series that it wants to roll out, too. For publicity reasons, they likely don't want them to overlap too much either. There's a lot to consider.
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Dec 04, 2015
I wouldn't think overlapping would be a problem when a season is released all at once.
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Staff
Dec 05, 2015
As noted below, not everyone watches shows the second they're released. In fact, I think most people can't watch them all that way. But I was actually talking about publicity for ALL of Netflix shows. Netflix is bigger than just their Marvel dramas. New seasons of Bloodline, House of Cards, OITNB and more are all still coming in 2016, plus plenty of new originals, too. They're not going to want to overlap too much.
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Dec 04, 2015
Indeed....and what happened to Kimmy Schmidt??

Netflix has too many good shows right now. Having to wait two to three years for another JJ season sounds insane (she'll be OLD then!!) That's talking Louie numbers.
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Dec 04, 2015
I really enjoyed the show. I love Jessica. I love Trish. I like Malcolm a lot too. I'm really interested in Luke, which I guess is good as he's getting his own series. I loved Kilgrave too. I really enjoyed Tennant in the role because he made him so creepy and yet charming at the same time. Like you wanted to hang out with the guy, but at the same time you wanted to hit him with another bus.

A lot of people are complaining about Simpson, but it seems to me that all that stuff is going to lead us into next season. The people that are playing let's make another super soldier are somehow involved with how Jessica got her powers. I bet they're up to no good and maybe it's up to Jessica and Trish to stop them. I bet Simpson will make a return too as he might be Nuke. Also, I kind of liked Simpson and his chemistry with the ladies. Then he over stayed his welcome.

The show dealt with some heavy issues, but I felt it did a good job. They weren't just plot device, but clearly had an impact on the characters. I do want another season.
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Dec 04, 2015

So after the show ended i gave jessica a 8.0 score. But after some time and after i watched the crossover of arrow and flash i realized wait a minute JJ is a masterpiece! I know u shouldnt compare shows but.. Look at arrow/flash. Why does berry catch a bullet in one fight and in others he cant overpower some guy with a gun? Why do i have to listen to arrows/flash melodramatic romances? If i drink every time cuz of a plothole will i die? I wish arrow/flash where so mature and interesting like JJ/DD. But being on CW they never will
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Dec 04, 2015
Comparing broadcast shows with something on payed cable/streaming service isn't exactly fair. But i agree it is a masterpiece.
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Dec 04, 2015
Officer Brett, whose mother Foggy continues to give cigars, was at the police station in episode 7 of Jessica Jones. So two crossovers.

And, although everyone on the internet seems to hate Robyn, I absolutely loved her character. Her one-liners and crazy monologues grew on me.
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Dec 05, 2015
Absolutely! Robyn and her brother worked so well for comedic relief.
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Dec 05, 2015
Also, he has Stan Lee picture behind him, in the wall :-)
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Dec 05, 2015
The same pic was in JJ, but in a different spot, according to IGN.
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Dec 05, 2015
That is what I meant. That Officer Bret came "from DD" with all and the picture (It's the same precint, of course)
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Dec 04, 2015
The show's credit sequence and its score are phenomenal and really set the the style, tone, and mood for the show.

Speaking of this....could someone please tell me how to shut off Netflix's auto-binge function, which skips the title sequence and shrinks the credits to microscopic size (and even cuts half of them off)? That's so annoying. I can't find an options menu to shut it off with.
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Dec 04, 2015
I have no idea where binge-watchers find the time to do what they do, and not only that, I don't condone the practice because when you watch that much at once, you miss a lot of details. I took JJ one episode per day and it may be the greatest show I've ever seen in my life. I have no idea how it could be topped by anything. What if this show spoils me for all other shows?

It's a valid concern. The episode of SHIELD where Ward tortured FitzSimmons was on after I finished the last JJ episode and nornally I would have been completely into it, but after Kilgrave nothing else felt quite as threatening. How am I supposed to care about Loki again? Heck, how am I supposed to care about something as huge as Thanos if he can't get under my skin on a personal level like Kilgrave did?
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Dec 04, 2015
Well writers have to up their game and stop giving us "oooh im bad beacuse the story needs a bad guy"
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Dec 04, 2015
Here is the thing with JJ. When i watched it i waited and waited for action scenes to happen. But somehow they rarely ever did. So after 5-6 episodes i realized that this wasnt that kinda show. I thik jessica is one of the rare shows that went the whole 13 episodes concentrating about 1 story/1villain. Which is suprisingly refreshing.

But the thing still that was missing is more action... i mean she is a superhero that rarely uses her powers and another problem is as much i liked kilgrave more villains would have been interesting.
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Dec 05, 2015
She is not a superhero. She was but she quit. So yes, if you wanted action that was not your kind of show.
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Dec 04, 2015
Superb show.
Sustained the tension and suspense all the way through, unlike DareDevil, which I thought fizzled out around ep 8.

But I don't like Netflix's release at once strategy.
It removes the anticipation between each episode. And, more importantly, makes week by week, episode by episode, discussions, on sites like this, impossible.
Since no one, that I see on a daily basis, watched it, I had no one to share my enthusiasm with, which is what TV.com is for and is often half the fun.
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Dec 05, 2015
you can make your own antici.....(wait for it)...pation anytime you want by using a little thing called self control and watch the eps at your pace. i'm a HUGE fan of releasing them all at once though - which allows people the choice to watch however they see fit.
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Dec 04, 2015
As a binge-athon I really enjoyed it, and the pacing didn't really bother me. The only thing that started to bother me a bit was Jessica's negativity. I appreciate that the draw of her character is her sarcasm and wit, but I needed just a smidge more sugar. I thought Trish was a great character though.
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Dec 04, 2015
I finished watching the finale last night. Overall I wasn't impressed, and clearly disagree with the author here that it's the best Marvel show produced. I thought Daredevil was far, far better.

Jessica Jones is much too long. It didn't need to be 13 episodes and wasted may too much time on irrelevant story lines like the Carrie-ann Moss love triangle, and Ruben's sister, who I kept hoping Kilgrave would order to cut out her own vocal chords. I still don't even get what purpose Simpson's character served, what organization he was a part of, where he went and what drugs he was using. In the end, it didn't matter anyway, so that story line was another throw away. Overall, the writing was not tight at all.

The whole pursuit to kill Kilgrave dragged on and went on too long. If I took vodka shots every time Jones said "Kill Kilgrave" I'd be drunk in the first 5 minutes.
The overuse of the same themes became a bore.

Jones is drinking hard liquor in nearly every scene and always seems to have the money to buy booze even though she's basically broke and needs money from Trish. Hogarth is an ice-cold lawyer that can stand up to the toughest cops, but for some reason continually takes crap and verbal abuse from Jones whenever the latter literally demands she do something for her. I kept waiting for some special relationship or some dirt that Jones had on Hogarth to explain why she puts up with such abuse, but nothing ever shows up.

I thought the show was OK. Nothing great, and certainly not better than Daredevil.
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Dec 04, 2015
I agree completely. The only think I would add is Killgrave escaping from capture 3-4 times. It really got tiresome. Otherwise I enjoyed the show. It's good, not great. I honestly don't think it's even better than Agents of SHIELD, Agent Carter, either. But that might be simply because shield had time to grow, and Carter was extremely well executed.
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Dec 04, 2015
You make some very good points..
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Dec 04, 2015
Daredevil &&& Jessica Jones. The only think that I found better was Tennant as Kilgrave. It's not that I didn't like Fisk just thought that Kilgrave was the better villain.
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Dec 04, 2015
I'm not familiar with the Jessica Jones comic book, but back in the day I was a collector of Daredevil and Spiderman comics where The Kingpin (aka Wilson Fisk) was one of the main villains. The Netflix Fisk is very close to the Comic Fisk, so I actually liked Fisk as a villain better. I thought the concept of Kilgrave was cool and scary, and Tenant did a great job of acting, but really, they are completely different villain archetypes.
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Dec 04, 2015
Oh, I didn't know Fisk was supposed to be the Kingping. I know nothing about him, but now you mention it, I do vaguely remember him appearing on (probably) Spiderman cartoons occasionally.
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Dec 04, 2015
I'm torn. Killgrave is evil for evil's sake, which makes him more villainous. But Fisk descends into villainy over the course of DD. Seeing him go from wanting to save the city - albeit via drug money and murder - to him declaring, "I am the ill intent," makes him the more intriguing villain.
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Dec 04, 2015
I'm in the minority camp of having been severely turned off by the focused obsession with getting Kilgrave. She was just so miserable and depressed, practically everyone was. Though completely understandable, the lack of seeing any other aspects of her life made the character feel severely limited. By the end the whole experience left a bad taste in my mouth.
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Dec 04, 2015
Yeah her desire for revenge (she'd call it justice) left very little room for any surprises regarding her relationship with Kilgrave... Not that I'm saying she should have forgiven him or taught him how to be good - although that would have been VERY interesting IMO - it was obvious that the writers had decided her being essentially raped while under Kilgraves control was something that could never be forgiven...
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Dec 07, 2015
And nor should it have been. But that one episode where she tried to show him what saving people is like, it was a fascinating idea that they quickly abandoned. It just felt like so many potential stories were cast aside to fit the narrative of "rape revenge story" that it ultimately was.
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Dec 04, 2015
At the end of the season, I still feel like casting Krysten Ritter was a mistake. She's a talented actress and never let the material down once, don't get me wrong about that, but there never was a point where we got a sense of the pre-Kilgrave Jessica Jones being particularly different from the post-Kilgrave one. Ultimately, they just had pre-Kilgrave Jessica be Krysten Ritter-esque instead, and by doing so it felt less like a character with an arc.
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Dec 11, 2015
New reply chain :)
I don't think they would first cast someone and then write around her casting.
I think the actors played the charactor the way it was written.
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Dec 11, 2015
Then they wrote a one-note character that was devoid of the very depth of personality of the character they were trying to emulate, which is dumb.
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Dec 13, 2015
I think you are a bit too harsh on them. ^^
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Dec 13, 2015
She starts a mope, we meet her as a mope with severe emotional damage, and finishes as a mope with severe emotional damage who has faced a few demons.

This instead of a dark character who started exuberant and bright with hints of emotional damage who is turned extremely dark and angry with severe emotional damage and becomes someone who goes through that to the other side.

How is that harsh?
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Dec 04, 2015
The pre-Kilgrave Jessica was already traumatized by the loss of here parents she feels guilty about and her new stepmother she had to live with.
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Dec 06, 2015
Even the child that gets in the car is a mope.
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Dec 09, 2015
And that was not Krysten Ritter.
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Dec 09, 2015
I think we've reached the end of the reply chain, but do you think they wrote the character to always have been a mope, or did they write and cast that child around Ritter's casting?
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Dec 04, 2015
Kaitlin, I think that's projecting to call it non-episodic, I found Jessica Jones very much an episodic show. The scripts had an episodic pacing with big reveals at the end of each one, standing shakily on each one's own legs, almost soap opera-like in its pacing. And having Kilgrave in her hands 4 times total certainly reeked of episodic television.

I predict that once the newness of Jessica Jones dies down it'll lose some of its luster. I found it not surpassing Daredevil on both technical and storytelling levels. So far, the reaction has been polarized of what I've seen, nobody else just likes it, it's either the best ever or worst ever.

Kilgrave is certainly the most complete villain the MCU has given us after Loki, but he's also much weaker a person than Loki and those weaknesses are shallow. Kilgrave is more Grant Ward than Loki, selfish and in denial about how he is achieving being the hero of his own tale.

This show could have stood to be 13 episodes, just not THESE 13 episodes. The original comic was about Jessica Jones and only slowly built to the big reveal, it wasn't about Killgrave directly; this show eschews that for a shallow focus on protagonist and antagonist, Jessica vs. Kilgrave. We barely get one side story for Jessica out of that, it's brief too.

I sort of loathed the last 4 episodes, the awful neighbor girl, the turn with Simpson and IGH thing just felt tacked on and hollow as it never really led to anything, just felt like filler to pad out story that turned on its heels and restarted what came a few episodes before, the stalking of Kilgrave.

Fixed their villain problem? Yet another MCU project where the villain has to die - I'd have rather seen them get bold with that and deal with the ramifications of Jessica knowing that justice meant leaving someone else to decide Kilgrave's final fate, that he is still out there awaiting trial or locked in a secret government prison, something other than the ol' snaparoo.

Oh yeah, Det. Clemons, the older black man who uncovers the truth and must die, just like Daredevil, what the fuck MCU, did you not realize you had fallen into a trope?

Had Jessica existed outside Kilgrave in this season, had she been a building character with thoughts and feelings outside of a very narrow set of events surrounding Kilgrave, I would have embraced a second season. But by eschewing the actual depth of Jessica Jones in season 1, they ruin seeing who she could be in a later season, she'll always be either a pale imitation or feel like a real character tacked on with less aim in a later season. I don't think we did spend any time in Jessica Jones' world, and that's the problem.

Hated the show's opening title sequence, seriously that was one of the things I intentionally avoided ever since, it looked bad and the music didn't fit.
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Dec 05, 2015
The part about the opening sequence and music not withstanding, I finally find someone's opinion I agree with! You hit a lot of the points that bugged me about this series.

Don't get me wrong, it wasn't a bad series, it just wasn't phenomenal or great or anything close to "the best show Marvel has produced yet." Definitely not better than Daredevil in my opinion. And honestly, I don't care one way or the other if it gets a season 2.

The murder of Det. Clemons bugged me at how unnecessary and yet, how extremely like Ben Urich's death it was. It struck me as odd too that both of the older, black, close-to-retirement age, really decent human being characters bit it in the most ignoble of ways. It just seemed like a statement that those kind of characters don't matter enough to keep alive.

And I feel the same way about the annoying neighbor girl and Simpson and IGH- they might have been interesting had they been interwoven a bit differently, but they just came across as not necessary to the story. I feel that Robin was originally intended to be comic relief, but became a victim of her own tragic storyline.

The idea of Trish sleeping with the guy that had mindlessly tried to strangle her just never, ever made sense to me. He just seemed irredeemably creepy, even from the start where he was sitting outside her apartment waiting for her so he could apologize some more. Just no!

I don't want to bash the series- it was a decent story for the most part; I just didn't find it as great or compelling as many others did.
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Dec 06, 2015
I think Clemons' death was intended, like Urich's, to show that "valuable" people can still be taken out, a symbol of the fragility of life in the story and danger from the villain, without realizing they're walking into a trope.

Ironically, were it not for Clemons' death, every single character and event in this show - outside the client who hated heroes - was related to Kilgrave.

Robyn was having a weird incesty relationship, there was no way to take her seriously yet there was no room for comic relief. If she had been played softer as direct comic relief, that would have made her turn against Jessica at least jarring and powerful, instead of an awful person doing one more awful thing. Robyn is almost like Kilgrave in controlling her brother and then the group to destructive purposes, yet we never truly learn what she wants because she's just the worst.

I must admit, I bought the turn with Trish sleeping with Simpson, she had prior experience with the Kilgrave story and he earned her trust, she had been isolated and he was able to help her feel safe after someone else turned her into a puppet. But for Simpson to also be Nuke, how many coincidences does one season need?

You are exactly right, it's not the worst, it's not the best, it's flawed but not a total loss.
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Dec 20, 2015
Hi, I can't believe I signed up to this website to defend Robyn of all characters, but I think the parallels between her and Kilgrave were intentional and part of one of the show's major themes: Justice. The show went to great lengths to say that, despite a person's flaws, all victims deserve justice, but it is the desire for revenge that turns victims into victimizers. Robyn ultimately showed forgiveness while Kilgrave took revenge at every opportunity.

There was a line in one of the episodes (I can't remember which one) "Maybe some people aren't worth saving." It's a philosophy that Jessica as a hero worked hard to reject, no matter how much antipathy she felt for most people (including Robyn and Reuben). I think the ending made it perfectly clear, It's not easy for her, but only by putting her natural cynicism, pessimism, and disdain aside is she able to help people and have a positive impact on their lives (Malcolm being the prime example).
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Dec 21, 2015
Yeah, that's a weird reason to sign up, to defend a character that's universally loathed.

I'm not sure I see enough connective tissue to buy your argument that it's intentional, Robyn is unrepentant and a user, yet enjoys both forgiveness and a positive outcome. It could have been intentional and left mostly out of the edit. Robyn's forgiveness comes at a point when it really is just lip service, and she ends her story basically returning to that pattern with Malcolm.
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Dec 05, 2015
We see flashbacks of her before Kilgrave, but I think that doesn't matter. She is not that person anymore because Kilgrave changed her for ever.
Also I wouldn't use te expression "a very narrow set of events surrounding Kilgrave"
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Dec 06, 2015
That's not how it works in real life, people are not just the sum of one traumatic experience, not even the comic book version of this character. I have known far too many women that have been raped, and the reality is that they endure, who they are may be changed but they are not eradicated.
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Dec 07, 2015
I never said "eradicated". When you change, you are not the person you are anymore. For instance, some tragedies in the family made me very different from the one I was. And Jessca has been raped constantly for at least a month (probably 8), so it's probably a deep change. And she had not a lot of support as many people just don't believe her.
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Dec 08, 2015
JT_Kirk "they are may be changed". Changed means not being the same., That is why I insist "When you change, you are not the person you are (I meant "were") anymore"
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Dec 07, 2015
"She is not that person anymore"
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Dec 04, 2015
I am also wondering how Netflix is going to manage to put all 5 shows with their different seasons and their interconecctions in play through time, but I am having a very good feeling so far.
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Dec 04, 2015
This was a fantastic show. The more I reflect on it and its plots and characters, this was unbelievably well done. Upon a second viewing this might be better than Daredevil.
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Dec 04, 2015
i didnt like jessica's personality that much but i really love the show as a whole. the problem is i specially loved david tennant so i dont know how season 2 can top that very awesome fearsome and entretaining villain
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Dec 04, 2015
though he wouldn't be back for season 2 - i would bet we haven't seen the last of Tennant as Kilgrave... nobody ever dies for good in the comics.. he'll show up again..
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