Perception Appears to Be a Little Too Calculated

Perception S01E01: "Pilot"

Like just about everything else, television is a copy-cat business. When someone or something works, that person, approach, or formula gets repeated and regurgitated until audiences eventually grow tired of it. Major genres like the cop drama or the workplace comedy will always remain popular and prevalent, but the trendy alterations to those broad genres will come and go.

In recent years, one of the more common approaches to procedural storytelling has been to build the crime/medical emergency/insert your favorite occupational task here-solving around one singular, kooky individual. This isn’t a brand-new development by any means, but shows like House, Monk, Psych and The Mentalist all helped usher in this contemporary era of weirdo problem-solvers and a number of other shows have tried and failed in their attempts to riff on that formula. With House and Monk off the air and Psych and The Mentalist aging, I thought maybe we'd reached and then passed the saturation point for shows about People Who Can Solve Everything But Themselves!

Apparently, TNT disagrees with me. Lost amid the flashy press-push for Dallas and the incessant, bro-y ads for Franklin & Bash during the NBA Playoffs is the cable channel’s newest procedural, Perception. I guess TNT assumed that almost no promotion was necessary for a show debuting behind the Final, No Seriously These Are The Final Episodes of The Closer. The network is probably correct in that assumption.

Perception—doesn’t that title just scream "basic cable mediocrity"?—stars Eric McCormack as Daniel Pierce, a university professor and neuroscientist who successfully assists the FBI with some very difficult cases. Unfortunately, Daniel can’t always help the FBI or himself because he struggles with his own neurological disorders, namely schizophrenia. GASP. Daniel has a “teaching assistant” nearby at all times to keep him tethered to reality (as much as he can be) and spends much of his time listening to old tapes of classical music, doing crosswords in record time (misunderstood genius, y’all!) and talking to his best friend Natalie, played by the always-lovely Kelly Rowan.

At the beginning of the pilot, Daniel has been away from his FBI consulting for a while but is pulled back into it when his former student/now agent Kate (Rachael Leigh Cook) returns to the fold. Literally four minutes into the episode, Kate has convinced Daniel to re-join her in crime solving, and by minute five, he is already interviewing a possible suspect in an interrogation room. If you were looking for something a little deeper than “He’s Crazy, and She’s a Cop,” you were likely disappointed with the opening act.

However, Perception’s biggest issues have little to do with its desire to quickly move beyond the obvious premise set-up stuff that plagues pilots. In fact, the script’s economical handling of Daniel’s issues and his relationship with Kate is actually a bit refreshing. This way, there's no need to spend a half-dozen episodes with the two of them learning to work together, him being wacky and her looking exasperated. That’s definitely going to happen, probably almost every week, but at least there is history here that doesn’t—or at least shouldn’t—result in too much overwrought and unnecessary “tension.”

No, Perception struggles because its premise is an all-you-can-eat buffet of generic tropes and quirks from so many shows like that came before. Do you like it when The Mentalist Patrick Jane does zany things out in the field while working a case? Maybe you enjoyed it when House came up with unheard of diagnostic ideas? Perhaps you appreciated Monk’s dysfunctional social skills? If that's the case, Perception features all of those elements, reheated and re-served, even though they’ve been sitting under the heat lamps for six years.

So much about Perception is just so calculated. Despite his serious issues, the pilot is full of mild, toothless humor. McCormack is even styled in the perfect way: perfectly un-perfect hair, scarf, sweaters with buttons undone and a whole lot of I Can’t Take Care of Myself stubble.

The premise is obviously related to those of the aforementioned shows (among others), but this pilot takes it step further by somehow being both a police procedural and a medical mystery procedural. Daniel uses his heightened awareness to notice things and then backs them up, at times, with plot-device patients that serve as a sort of “human lie detector.” These short scenes are moderately compelling—if entirely too convenient—but when they simply lead to another small piece of a case full of misdirects, the impact is muted.

The show’s most novel element is the seriousness of Daniel’s ailments and the second half of the episode is driven by him seeing someone who is not actually there but is part of “something” pertinent to the case that he noticed. On the first go-round, this device is pretty compelling. McCormack does fine work playing Daniel’s combination of confusion, intelligence, and excitement and the fact that the show acknowledges that the schizophrenic vision is a device to help Daniel work through things makes it easier to play along and follow the clues. Nevertheless, I'm worried that after a handful of episodes, watching Daniel talk to human representations of tiny clues is going to get very tiring and become an obvious crutch for the writers.

The pilot’s final moments reveal that Daniel’s schizophrenia is actually worse than we were initially led to believe, as Rowan’s Natalie appears to be just another figment of his imagination. Rowan and McCormack have easy patter and fun chemistry but again, I fear that the relationship will become either another plot device or a weekly way for Daniel to didactically rant about how misunderstood he is. There is a fine line to walk with these elements and the pilot didn’t necessarily convince me that Perception can toe the right side of that line in a longer series.

If Perception is actually interested in exploring what is a very serious illness in schizophrenia, as the final reveal with Natalie almost suggests, this could be a solid and compelling character-based procedural. McCormack brings some nice texture to the lead role and never overdoes any of the showy “weirdo” or “I’ve solved it!” scenes; there’s an earnestness to him that separates this performance from the more sardonic or detached work that we’ve seen from Hugh Laurie or Simon Baker in similar roles.

Yet, I can’t help but think McCormack isn’t really going to get that much chance to shine, just like I don’t imagine Daniel or any of the other characters will come before the case of the week. At this point, TNT knows exactly to develop a show into a procedural hit and if Perception is going to be the latest in that line, neither McCormack nor his character’s complexities are likely to be given their just-due. Perception will likely always be watchable summer entertainment but there is room for it to be much more.


What did you think of Perception's debut?


Cory Barker is a co-founder of This Was Television and the founder of TVSurveillance.com. Follow him on Twitter: @corybarker.

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I finally got around to watching this show and figured I'd throw my two cents into the show's review page but I see someone has already done a better job elaborating on my thoughts. "basic cable mediocrity" is a perfect description of a writer's silly notion of coming up with a less entertaining combination of Monk, Mentalist of Psych, all of which seemed to have emulated elements of the 1998 movie Zero Effect. The only difference between those shows copying elements of a movie is that two of them did it successfully and produced long running, entertaining shows. Maybe it gets better after the first episode but it seems to just try too hard.
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How exactly does the title Perception scream 'basic cable mediocrity' any more than the title of any other show on television?
This review is crippled by cynicism, ignorance and prejudice. It would be blatantly offensive to almost anyone who suffers from schizophrenia or related disorders or cares about someone who does.
*Any*show that attempts to raise the issues that this one does, which are otherwise only raised in little seen documentaries should be applauded. It could just as easily be argued that the producers used the precedent of the success of the other shows cited to courageously create something about a very controversial issue. Would a show about someone who has schizophrenia who is so openly symtomatic even have been possible a few years ago? Would it have a chance of becoming popular?
References to 'crazy' or 'weirdo problem solvers' or putting an exasperated GASP next to the word schizophrenia are as ignorant, offensive and outdated as negative references to blacks, homosexuals, women and other groups are.
Of all the marginalized minority groups, it's still acceptable to label and marginalize the mentally ill who are arguably one of the groups in society that suffers the worst, there are 20,000,000 million schizophrenics in the US living largely on the outer margins of society. And unlike other groups, they are largely unable to advocate for themselves. Many, many of them could live much, much fuller and happier lives if they had access to the resources that Dr, Pierce has.
How someone can be as shallow and insensitive as this author is is beyond me.
People Who Can Solve Everything But Themselves? This implies that the person should be able to 'solve their own problems' when, in fact, these are crippling, devastating, chronic illnesses that no one can cure. David Pierce is an example of a very high functioning schizophrenic. Most are not nearly so fortunate. Many live on the streets and in back wards of hospitals under terrible, hopeless conditions.
The reality is that *any* show that is able to bring characters like this more into the mainstream is a service to society. Ideally, it would lead to broader mainstreaming of such characters across the media, as other shows in the past have for other groups. I can't help but think of Bill Cosby's character in I, Spy. Or the minorities featured in the original Star Trek. Even a comparison to House is misguided. As much as I enjoyed House, his problems *were* mostly self-inflicted and he was capable of solving them but repeatedly chose not to. To lump them together further shows the weakness of the authors grasp of this issues.
By creating an engaging character who is relatively high-functioning but still illustrates how devastating the illness can be, I hope Perception opens people eyes in a non-threatening way that might awaken compassion toward those who are more seriously affected.
I suffer from bipolar disorder. When at my worst, my symptoms overlap with those of schizophrenia. I know what it's like. I can empathize with David Pierce. It seems clear to me that the producers and writers of this show know a thing or two about these conditions and care about the issues.
The show captures very well the isolation, loneliness, confusion and loss that the illness can cause as well as the very real social issues that the mentally ill face. I was encouraged by his courage in quitting his position at the University even if it changes the face of the show. None of the other shows cited by the author confront the issues as openly and directly as this one does. Dr. Pierce's opening and closing speeches are brilliantly often succinct. Many people like me wish that he had a Max Lewicki, or a 'holographic' friend like Natalie available when we need them so that we can live more normally in a way that other mentally healthy people take for granted. Dr. Pierce's helpful hallucinations are something many people like me long for every day when our minds fail to supply us with the insight we need.
Friendship, normal human bonding, the ability to carry on a normal conversation in a crowded room, or at all, is beyond many of us. To me, reveal at the end of the first episode that Natalie was a hallucination, was gut-wrenching and heart-breaking and provoked a lot of tears.
Seen through the perspective of someone with this kind of illness, this show is brilliant. If others cannot see this, it is unfortunate and I encourage to look into the issues more deeply.
But it's not even just about schizophrenia. It's a brilliant introduction into the strange and fascinating world of neurological disorders, which are far more common than the mainstream is aware of. Hopefully it will stimulate interest in this as well. I would recommend the writings of Oliver Sacks or Antonio Damasio to anyone.
The reality is that virtually everyone is going to have to come to terms with some form of neurological deficit or disorder at some point their lives, in themselves or someone they love. 10% of the population will experience major depression which may require treatment and that is considered the 'common cold' of mental health problems.
But what I really like about the show is that it also captures the advantages that the illness can give to some people - like quirky insight or creativity - *if* they are able to find effective treatment and adequate social support. It shows that they can be happy and successful and productive despite their illness.
It is ultimately optimistic and I hope that it is uplifting, inspiring and encouraging to other sufferers and their caregivers as it is to me.
It's not perfect. But it's fun and entertaining, factually sound and sensitive. I'll overlook a lot of flaws in favor of that. Since 99% of TV is tragically mediocre anyway, anything that has any real social value is refreshing.
A show like this should be lauded. I hope it has a good long run.
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This show is for those who can understand the science behind it and those who do not know anything but are willing to learn and are amazed by it. If smb cannot follow it's ok, stop watching, but there is no need to negatively criticise it. There are plenty other shows or soap operas available and more suitable.
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I just love Natalie's sweaters !!!!💕
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perception is a good show. from the 2 seasons so far.
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I'd just like to add "The 11th Hour" to the list of similarly built shows - a weird scientist helping a cute but strong female agent solve strange crimes... but then again, I've watched a few episodes and I'm enjoying this, so I'll keep watching :)
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I absolutely HATED that cliche cop character! That enough was enough to turn me off. But seeing Geordi La Forge working again was nice! :-) I might check out more eps since I don't watch much on Mondays but if that cop is in every episode I'm done. Geordi La Forge or no!
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We can add "Unforgettable" to the list of medical/police procedurals?
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I didnt like House and monk, psych and Sherlock but I actually sat an watched this and really enjoyed it..
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I wasn't going to watch it, but eventually I did and I'm glad I did. Of course if you watch every single procedural with quirky male non-cop detective partnered with small-framed but strong and independent, down-to-earth female cop, you might not want just another one in your life, but since the last "quirky detective" show I saw was Monk, I guess I'm ready for another one.



I just think too much happened in this pilot and at some point I was a bit lost where the case was and how they had come to certain conclusions. And Kelly Rowan's character was clearly imaginary since he was talking to her precisely about the fact that he couldn't connect to human beings enough to have a relationship, so that was an obvious tell.



As usual, they try to be politically correct on tv. The human lie detector patient laughed at Bush's lies (saying Iraq had "nucular" weapons), and Clinton's "I did not have sex with that woman" speech. But that PC move was poorly done. Bush's lie was displayed prominently, and Clinton's passage had a much lower impact. Besides, Bush's lie cost thousands of lives and millions of dollars in a senseless war, while all Clinton had was a sexual indiscretion.



Back to the essence of the show, I think the protagonist's life was just too neat and organized for someone with such serious mental issues. His class was well planned and executed. He seems to well adjusted to a seemingly healthy life. I would like to see him having a breakdown or something later on.



By the way, I thought it was curious that his "evil guy" hallucination was with the actor that plays Pope in Falling Skies, or The Devil in The Collector. Indeed if you ever have a hallucination and that guys shows up, you can tell you're in deep trouble!
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This show couldn't hold my interest. Stupid from the get go.
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I was thinking the same thing! As first it was ok, but then it kept going and keep trying to hard to be what ever it was they thought. As a professional tv watcher, this one might not make it. I will not be watching anymore.
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Well I liked the main characters, so that is always good.

Now... I DO miss Monk & House...

So we'll see how the show evolves... past the 1st season at least...
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With any other actor than Eric McCormack ... this show would not work at all.



And if they include too many more "conductor" scenes, the show might as well start writing severance checks
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Looks fun but on wrong night like many new and regular shows, everything in same slot on same nights except Fridays got nothing until Fall if even.
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Forever and ever until the end of time every tv show will be a copy or a clone of another TV show, so complaining about it is like complaining that the sun will rise. We should all know by now that will always always always happen, reliably.



So moving forward, this version of the crime solving savant has some pretty unique strengths and some pretty typical downfalls, in fact the downfalls are so typical that pretty much every show on tv makes them. Which is why I thought this show was pretty good.



For those of us paying attention, you may have noticed that the vast majority focused on the main characters mental issues rather then the solving of the crime. Its almost as if this show is about a mentally ill college professor but to fill in some of the time they threw in a quick crime for him to solve.



If TNT is wise they'll focus on this departure from the typical crime solver equation and branch the show out beyond simple crime solving and pose more interesting original questions like how this mentally ill yet ingenious man will have to deal with a multitude of scenarios and situations.



Also



Thank god they reveled his confidant to be a hallucination instead of dragging it out beyond the first episode.
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rachel cook looks like she's still in high school. rowan's character was obviously, from her first scene, a figment of his imagination.



if next week he has another delusion that turns out to be a clue, i'm gonna stop watching it. c'mon.



oh, you forgot to mention castle and white collar. more than house, those are good examples of "good cop-quirky not-cop" genre. but they have nathan fillion and that gorgeous guy... oh, yeah, matt bomer.
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Perception is the most creative detective show I've ever seen.



That's what I would say if I had never seen:



1.Monk

2.A Beautiful Mind

3.Numbers

4.psych

5.Law and Order: Criminal Intent

6.House

7. Sherlock

8.Mentalist

9.Lie to Me

10...and counting...it's an amalgamation of elements



I saw elements of all these shows in the plot, the fashion, the mood, the characterization, and in the newspaper under my bed.



That said, I enjoyed the first episode and will watch the complete season.



(I wrote this BEFORE I read this article...so I guess I agree with the article!)
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Almost had me for a second, lol...
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Agreed, it's quite derivative. Then again, you'd be hard pressed to make a detective-show that wasn't derivative at this point since there have been so many.



I feelings were "meh." I'd watch it if there was nothing else on, but wouldn't miss it if / when it gets cancelled. With Eureka ending and Lost Girl moving to Fridays... I might wind up watching it since the rest of my Monday shows are now gone.
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First of all I thought your review was very perceptive. And I'll tell you right now that a lot of people definitely missed the fact that Natalie was never real in this episode because the other guy completely overshadowed the subtleness of Natalie whoever she actually is or was because the other guy who was so dynamically not real. And the very idea that hallucinations could actually be insightful is pretty ludicrous. This all reminded me of the short lived show Raines which starred Jeff Goldblum because all his imaginary characters were just extensions of his thought process, and this is all just a multi-one-trick-pony. That said I have to say I liked it even though the last scene with the real scantilly clad girl was so very predictable but still fun. And you're absolutely right that this show and this episode was much less than all it could have been. But I trust it will get better quickly or die quickly.
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Yeh, the one show that I liked with the whole "hallucination" thing was "Endgame"



Only in his case, it wasn't a hallucination. It was him pondering and thus "imagining" what happened / why something happened / etc. Like he was using the imagination as a sounding board while he thought out loud.



"Why would someone want you dead / Maybe I was stealing money / No, that doesn't make sense / etc"
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The fact that an american born actor played the lead indicates this critic is absolutely correct and that the zany, messed up, and misunderstood character has become so mundane, it is even considered to be an acceptable role by careerist american born actors and their agents.



I'm sure there were plenty of american born actors up to the task of playing the roles Hugh Laurie and Simon Baker took, but the widely held Hollywood belief that audiences consider any actor who plays a gay male to be gay themselves, or playing a mentally ill role means the actors must be mentally ill has kept US born actors away from some of the juiciest roles on offer to relatively unknown actors.

Few young american actors even seem prepared to play a baddie if the character isn't a two dimensional cliche, lest they inadvertantly chase off 'the fans'.

I thought Perception was a total crock that simultaneously belitted and demonised schizophrenics by dragging out nearly every cliche about the disease, from 'hearing 'the voices' to consucting non-existant orchestra's.



An entire generation of humans sufferring from autistic spectrum disorders are treated disdainfully as soon as it becomes apparant they're not geniuses at maths or art or whatever, thanks to the rainman, so lets hope Perception provides a more nuanced, less cliched depiction of schizophrenics as this series progresses.



I'd be thinking this show won't make it to the end of season one except that I don't like it and the networks only ever seem to cancel the shows I like.
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Eric McCormack is actually Canadian.
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The concept isn't new, or the best, and McCormack is still "will and Grace" .

It wasn't bad nor good. but all the good tv shows ended, cancelled, whatever.

though, nothing else to watch.

will watch until summer season is ended and the good tv show returned
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Actually there is still lots of good stuff to watch with all the cable shows that actually make TV come full circle every year now. Covert Affairs, Leverage, The Closer, Continuum and some others are actually as good or better than most network fair anyway - Royal Pains, Burn Notice, White Collar, Alphas, Warehouse 13 and Sons of Anarchy to name the ones from the top of my head.
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Your argument is weakened by the inclusion of "Continuum", which so far is love letter to corporate authoritarian rule...but, yes, I'm a fan, too...mainly because there is so little options to watch in sci-fi (Alphas is almost unwatchable as well)
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Definetly ridiculous and not worth my time
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But I bet somehow that Survivor is...
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A bit too ridiculous for my tastes. I really wanted to like it because of the cast.
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Right from the start i knew it was familiar.. and yes Raines sprang to mind and when it started to hit the same beats as Raines pilot i knew they would just use the same twist at the end.. painfully unoriginal... watch Jeff Goldblum's show instead of this hammy crap.
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What do you do when you've watched all seven episodes though?
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The first half was mediocre at best, but then it pick up the pace and it gets better, however the characters look kinda hatchet and formulaic, like the scene at the station at the beginning, or Leigh Cook jumping from like the 2nd floor of a building to catch a guy on the street, while wearing heels, come on, I thought Bionic Woman was cancelled.



The allucination guy, that caught me offguard, and both endings were a bit predictable, however enjoyable.



McCormack and Cook are okay actors, definitely no Laurie or Baker, however they played alright, the characters could have been better made.
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Contrived nonsense
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I like Eric McCormack and Rachel Leigh Cook, but I didn't care much for the episode. It was probably okay enough for me to give it another couple shots, but this one in particular was a bit too boring.



The biggest problem I had was that I anticipated both of the "twists" early on. As soon as they revealed Pope -- uh, Permut -- as an imaginary being, I figured Kelly Rowan's character was as well. I also expected Dr. Bryant to be the killer as soon as they introduced him. I've said this before but I'll say it again, I'm not smart enough to be able to easily predict these kinds of reveals. If the writers can't fool me, they're really not trying very hard.



Also, I found myself hating both of the male cops: the feeb that's possibly Kate's partner (did I miss his introduction, or did they just sneak him in?) and that brash local cop. If a show is going to be rather simple, they should at least have characters (even supporting ones) that are likable.
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I don't think the crime was supposed to be hard to figure out, I think it was just a tool the writers used to flesh out mccormacks character and how his illness influences his process.
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But did you anticipate the connection to the mistress or the original suspect, or that the original suspect SPOILER! SPOILER! was the intended victim of a murder conspiracy? To me, that was the intriguing part.
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Good call and I think that may have been what saved it for me.
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So far it s a watchable summer series. It has potential to be a summer hit if they develop it. (Characters,arch story, solo cases) Always liked series/movies where genius mind is used to solve problems.

Anyway i ll take any watchable scipted series over BS"reality" shows
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Absolutely...
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It wasn't bad. The Psychology is fairly sound. And it is kind of a new take on the whole hyper aware trope that is popular among crime dramas right now. It does show Schizophrenia in a fairly accurate, at least for the functional Schizophrenics, light. I agree I would much prefer a character drama with McCormick dealing with that more than a crime of a week type thing. McCormick is good. I am not sure I buy Rachael Leigh Cook as the action star they made her to be in that one scene. I would much prefer they keep her an intelligent Agent who is almost the equal of Daniel but without his "access" to his sub conscious. I like that better than portraying the Cop as lost without the consultant. I will probably watch this.
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The two-story jump was ridiculous until she landed on the guy and then it was okay except that it was ridiculous to do something so stupid for a simple paycheck as your only motivation - which makes her crazier then him if you think about it.
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How do we know Moretti actually jumped? The suspect could have stopped when she told him to freeze and the doctor could have imagined the jump (in slo-mo) for all we know. But like you said, assuming she did make the jump, Moretti might not be all there.
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Well let's see if Elementary does anything different.
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I will not be watching "Elementary." I have too much respect for Arthur Conan Doyle. Classic period literature should remain in the time and pace of its author's creation, even when translated to the large or small screen. A female Watson? That alone makes it ridiculous. Are they doing it just so they can create romatic tension between Holmes and Watson? I'll pass.
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Meh, the thing is Moffat just did "Sherlock" for BBC. It was Sherlock Holmes taking place in present day UK, with cell phones and the whole sha-bang. If that didn't happen, "Elementary" might be more interesting but I just watched a bunch of modern takes on Doyle classics.



I'll give "Elementary" a try, I'm a fan of Lucy Liu and I think the lead (Miller) was good in "Eli Stone"
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The scenes where Pierce go around accusing pretty much everyone just reminded me of the Elementary trailer. I assume Holmes won't actually have hallucinations (visual hallucinations is crazy rare by the by)



After seeing the entire first ep. as most people have pointed out it gives off a L&O, Monk, Bones (just that interrogation room, even though the one in Bones is darker and the the block pattern is more defined), Awake, House and even a bit of Numbers vibe. It might not be bad, but it I can't see it being much better than aggressively average either. I feel it will be a lot like Body of Proof, something that is just there and watchable but forgotten once it's not in front of your eyes.



McCormack does a good job, Cook comes off as a non-entity and I kind of like Smith. I can also see a pretty big story line with Rowan's character though it was pretty obvious where they were taking that from the get go.
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Oh and The Finder and kind of Cold Case.
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Eric McCormack is great, I remember watching him in Dead Like Me and just being blown away from how different his character was to Will. But this show doesn't interest me at all.
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Pretty good debut. It does remind me of Monk a little, but time will tell if this show will last another season.
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Monk got by on the cuteness of Tony Shaloub alone...
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She's All That. The show isn't, but you already knew that.
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Not too bad. I will probably invest some time and see if it gets better. I have some hope it will. I see a little spark that could turn into a flame. Kelly Rowan= amazing.
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I would include Castle in those formula shows. But they're all based upon Sherlock Holmes. With the Holmes stories, you have a quirky super-genius and a normal character as his companion. (For that matter even Dr. Who could be considered as part of that formula.)

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Watson is anything but normal in the good Sherlock tales...
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I disagree. There's actually 2 different basic crime dramas that you see 90% of the time. There's the one where one partner is incredibly smart yet damaged and the other one is basically there to tether them to reality. These are shows like Monk where he's brilliant but can't function without his assistant, Pysch where Shawn notices everything but is basically a 5 year old, etc. Even shows like CSI fall into this genre where the show was mostly centered around Petersen, Fishburne, and now Danson.



The other one is when opposite partners complete each other and usually come with the "He's the... and she's the..." Here you have shows like Castle "She's an obsessed uptight cop, he's a fun loving writer", Bones "She's a scientist with no social skills, he's a Fed with a troubled past", White Collar "He's a Fed who catches con artist, He's the con artist who's on work release," etc.



Occasionally you see some branching out into group solving such as Criminal Minds, but not often. But anyway to get back to my point... while Perception wasn't too bad the only thing I could think while watching it was this is a less funny version of Monk.
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Actually I was pretty tired of CSI until Danson and Shu showed up. It's once again fresh as even the writing has improved greatly and have zeroed in on the regular characters instead of the killer of the week who is oft times just not interesting. They should call the Dansen era CSI 2.0...
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I wouldn't put House or Holmes in either of those categories. (Or Doctor Who). I'd consider them a third category: the Eccentric Super-Genius who keeps people around to demonstrate how smart he is, but he only needs when it's a plot contrivance or ESG can't be everywhere at once. (And the Doctor sometimes manages that anyway :) ).
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This was sooooo boring. How can you like a show when you know who the murder is 5 seconds after he's introduced? Also, I find the fact that we see everything through Pierce's POV most of the time annoying b/c that means I don't trust the narrator, so I question every character's existence unless they interact with some else, so I know who the hallucinations are whether they reveal them or not. We all watched the 6th sense, we know the clues. I do like Kate's character though, and maybe the TA/live in nurse.
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I liked it. It's not perfect, but i love Eric McCormack and i enjoyed his character.

I'll keep watching.
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I liked it. Honestly, I was just glad for something to watch that wasn't on Thursday. It could use work and Kate doesn't really interest me at all. We'll see. And yes I remember RAINES!!!!! Miss that show.
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Agreed reviewer! It was all pretty meh.... I didn't mind the imaginary characters but some of the other quirks are a bit forced when not plain annoying... Like conducting classical music? please....



The case was actually pretty interesting with all the twists soI may still give it a chance ...
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I thought it was OK, but nothing special. There were a lot of unbelievable moments, and Shreela mentioned some of them. Also, from the moment I saw Natalie I knew she was going to be a hallucination. Something about the way they were talking about the date that they didn't go on (or something like that) in grad school. I started thinking that he was regretting it, and that's why she appeared. But I absolutely knew she was a hallucination in the second scene when he's talking about connecting with no one. Because it was a little too much "Well, he's connecting and intimate with her!" that made me think that. Plus, I have "A Beautiful Mind." I've seen it before.



Still, I love Eric McCormack and I'll keep watching it.



Kat
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I was hoping I'd like it like I loved Monk. After the first show, I'm disappointed. Here's some things that bothered me: the fat cop/agent was like watching a SNL parody; the young female agent jumped off a 2nd story stairwell, unbelievable; the main character solved too many things using anagrams; and I had a difficult time believing someone having animated conversations with unseen beings in public could be a college professor for very long.
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It also borrows some pieces of "Endgame" and "Raines."



In "Endgame," the super-smart-crime-solver is an agoraphobic who can't leave his hotel room (and doesn't). He is a chess master, and often imagines himself talking to the victim and suspects to work out how or why the person was killed. Endgame was actually a solid TV show.



Raines also had Jeff Goldblum talking to people not there.
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PS: "CSI" (with Gil "I'm not really a people person" Grissom} and "Law & Order: Criminal Intent" were both on the air when "Monk" and "House" debuted, so the current round of quirky detectives has been going on for more than six years.
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Obviously. But those 2 I mentioned were more directly linked. Both involved guys with mental problems that hallucinated (or imagined) and interacted with the hallucinations to solve stuff.



Fine, go all the way back to Sherlock Holmes if you want (and I'm sure earlier). I'm just making the hallucination link.
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Apparently the reviewer isn't familiar with "Raines," since that and "Numbers" are both shows closer in concept to "Perception" (which is a compelling title for me). And since it's revealed in the promos that Daniel is seeing things, Newicki or whatever her was being a figment of Daniel's imagination was no surprise at all. I imagine the revelation will be she was Daniel's murdered wife or the victim in a case he hasn't solved. Speaking as a viewer, I'm not looking for a dissertation on schizophrenia. To me, that's just the device that sets Daniel apart. Bring on the case of the week; I will take a procedural over a reality show any day. "Too calculated"? Baloney! The complexity of the reveal and how almost everything was tied together was my favorite part.
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I remember Raines just fine. Just figured most readers/viewers would be more familiar with some of the shows I listed than one that didn't last too long. Fair point on Numbers though.
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THANK YOU SO MUCH! I THOUGHT I WAS THE ONLY ONE WHO REMEMBERED RAINES. XD
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woopie doo! care factor?
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I have all seven episodes on one DVD that I will probably never watch again...
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