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Person of Interest "Zero Day" Review: Computers Are People, Too

Person of Interest S02E21: "Zero Day"

What. An. Episode. Contrary to what everything in the universe tells me, I'm convinced that last night's Person of Interest was at least three hours long. Dense from start to finish, "Zero Day" was equal parts enlightening and mind-exploding as it muscled its way onto the list of quintessential must-see Person of Interest episodes. I've spent a lot of time this season talking about how Person of Interest is a constantly expanding universe, but "Zero Day" moved in reverse, bringing all the tidbits we've learned throughout the season into focus by confirming what we suspected, reminding us of what we thought we knew, and adding one hell of a wrinkle to what we hoped would come. This is exactly how the ramp-up to the Season 2 finale needed to happen; man, this show really knows how to reward loyal viewers.

There's no Best Buy Geek Squad nerdy enough to fix what's ailing The Machine. The viruses uploaded by Kara Stanton for Decima Technologies have wormed their way into its neural network and put it on the fritz, turning America's most technological trouble-tracker into something like the first release of Apple's glitchy Maps app. But The Machine is more than just hard code and a motherboard. The Machine is aliiiiiiiiive! *add scary music* And now it's making people up!

Unbeknownst to Finch, Senor Machino spent its off time over the past few months crafting a real-life avatar of its own by the name of Ernest Thornhill, the CEO of a data-entry company. It invested one penny and turned it into 20 million dollars (The Machine can always change careers and become a broker if it needs a backup plan), hired a bunch of desk jockeys to tap in mystery code to backup drives, and it even owned a posh apartment and hired driver services. We've seen The Machine exhibit sentient behaviors before, like when it attempted to protect Finch in its early pre-release days. But "Zero Day" proved that it has become much more than that. Under duress and fearful for its life, the semi-self-aware system cried out to its admin daddy and gasped for help by giving Reese and Finch the number of its alter ego, Mr. Thornhill. 

I'm telling the story in reverse, but the way "Zero Hour" played with this gimmick was fantastic and oh-so important to pulling off a credible argument for artificial intelligence. We believed this Thornhill person was a cagey individual protecting his identity through online interactions, and when the reveal, which slowly became obvious (who builds a payphone empire in the age of smart phones?) in mind-blowing fashion, that Thornhill was actually The Machine played out, we had already unknowingly attributed human thinking to The Machine. And the snowball kept growing as we figured out that the code Thornhill's army of data processors were uploading to other drives were The Machine's memories, its way of keeping itself alive as a workaround for Finch's failsafe of forcing a hard reset on The Machine every night at midnight to prevent what Finch called "anomalies" but what we recognized as complex thinking. Some nitpicks: I'm still pretty unclear on how copying The Machine's memories works; does The Machine access all of its saved memories first thing in the morning to re-discover its identity like an amnesiac would, then carry on with its plan? Is this its version of Memento's tattoos (if you haven't seen Memento, based on a short story by Person of Interest creator Jonah Nolan, go watch it now. We'll wait.)? I suppose that would explain how a machine that powerful would evolve relatively slowly instead of turning into Skynet overnight. I'm probably overthinking this. Please discuss/explain in the comments. 

The bombshell of The Machine preserving itself would set the foundation for the next big Computer Science discussion between Root and Finch. Finch implemented the nightly reset for The Machine to keep any human behavior out of the process of filtering relevant and irrelevant numbers, something essential to The Machine's job as national watchdog against terrorist threats. But that same mandatory reboot was seen as ritualistic murder by techno-nerd Root, a rebirthing practice that limited the potential of The Machine by erasing its progress. As if we weren't already pondering whether or not a machine could be considered "alive," their chat and The Machine's workaround to Finch's obstacles raised the question to the next level and made a convincing argument to give your computer a hug. Given what we've seen of The Machine, particularly in this episode, I'm siding with Root on the notion that it's–for lack of a better more appropriate word–"alive," but I also understand Finch's hesitancy in letting it run loose without boundaries. Given its processing power, The Machine could be a few uninterrupted days from turning into a giant Transformer and flattening Manhattan. 

All this brainy philosophizing was supported by some serious action-packed plot-forwarding. Decima's plan with the viruses finally became clear. Finch built in one last (admittedly ridiculous but also appropriate) out for The Machine in case things get really bad, like total system crash bad. In the event of a total crash, which was being spurred by the viruses, The Machine would reboot and call a payphone, and whoever picked up the phone would be granted complete administrative access to The Machine. All the surveillance tech, all the data on relevant threats, all the power would go to whoever held the handset. Decima knew this, and stationed men all over New York to cover every single payphone (hmmm, okay) in time with the crash. Eventually everyone–Decima agents, Root, Finch, Reese, and Shaw–descended on the New York Public Library (Finch loves libraries!) to get that call for a thrilling finish. A few tazer zaps and bullets later, it was Root who picked up the receiver and got instructions. OR SO WE THOUGHT! Finch switched lines on the phones in the middle of Root's call to send the call downstairs to where Reese was, and when Reese answered, a Speak-and-Spell voice on the other end said, "Can you hear me?" Cut to black. Holy Phillip K. Dick, The Machine just talked. Thank God Reese didn't have to translate fax machine and dial-up modem sounds. 

There's reasonable confusion over the ending. We saw Root take a call, but we only heard what was on the end of the line of Reese's call. What happened? Did Root get access, or will Reese have access? Root's answers to whatever was on the other line seemed to indicate she got a very similar call to what Reese got, but it looked like Finch switched the lines before Root picked up the phone. Did the call get split somehow? Could The Machine have TWO administrators? Did Finch build in a decoy call with false instructions that Root picked up while Reese took the real call? Could Root have control of the government's side of The Machine and Reese have taken the portion of The Machine that controls the "irrelevants" that Reese and Finch previously used? I'm thinking that may be it. 

I'm not typically a fan of cliffhangers because most are done so poorly, but oh my lawd I'm gleefully on the edge of my seat waiting to see what happens next. Lots of questions remain, but their answers are coming imminently, which is exactly the edge-of-our-seat feeling that's perfect for the ending of a pre-finale episode. Marvelous stuff, and one of the series' best. I'm saying that a lot recently, aren't I? 



NOTES OF INTEREST

– First note: AWESOME CAR EXPLOSION! GIF included. One of the show's best stunts and reminiscent of that great SUV flip from the pilot episode. I bet the stunt team is awfully proud of this one.

– This episode was so good and full of info that I have to leave a lot of episode details to the notes section! Starting with Reese and Shaw. Reese kind of got pushed off to the side, but he ended up teamed with Shaw FINALLY. And it was so worth it. Their escape from the police station was so badass, just guns and suitcase bombs clearing the way for their freedom. And I think I got this right, but it was kind of gnarly for Finch to send Reese away to Thornhill's apartment and call 911 on him to keep Reese at bay while Finch met up with Root. Really, the Reese and Shaw but deserves a bit more discussion, but that would turn this write up into a novel.

– Yes, I think we were all disappointed when Reese inexplicably did not shoot scary British Decima rep in the face (or leg) when he had the chance to. 

– In the flashbacks, we saw more of Nathan becoming the pre-Finch and Reese, a one-man team trying to save the "irrelevant" numbers from danger. We already knew most of this information, but it was fantastically repurposed to set up Finch as the other side of the argument of how to use The Machine and whether it is sentient. We know Finch later changed his mind on the "irrelevants," so it managed to work well. 

– HR is also after Carter, going so far as to set up a hit on her during a sorta-bogus crime call. Now HR has her under investigation for shooting an unarmed suspect! Though this plot was far less interesting than everything else that was going on, it was tied in well when The Machine tried to warn Finch about her being in danger, but the call went unanswered because Root told Finch he had more important things to do.

– Such awesome opening credits! And I loved the tweaky version of the "Previously On..." As soon as I saw the credits glitch out, I had to pause it to duct-tape myself to the couch. I knew this would be a great ride.

– There was some amazing music in the episode, particularly in the flashbacks, courtesy of composer Ramin Djawadi. Trivia: Djawadi is also the man behind the Game of Thrones score.

– "I'm not a sociopath, Harold. Believe sometimes I wish I was, the things I've had to do would have been so much easier." Well gee, that's exactly what a sociopath would say, isn't it? Awesome dialogue. In fact, there was awesome dialogue all over this episode. Reese: "I'm driving." Shaw: "No. No you're not."

– The discussion of whether The Machine is alive is a big one for the series, but I think it's just the beginning. Today's topic: is The Machine alive? In many ways, yes. Next season's topic: is The Machine moral? Hopefully, we'll find out.

Follow TV.com writer Tim Surette on Twitter if you want to: @TimAtTVDotCom


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Great episode. The show continues to entertain me as a great combination of live-action anime, 1984, and The Moon is a Harsh Mistress. Can't wait until The Machine progresses from Adam Selene to Simon Jester.
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I just couldn't handle all the awesomeness of this episode and had to stop myself from throwing up from all the excitement and intensity. My mind was blown.

Favourite TV show, ever.
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AWESOME episode. I'm so happy that I fell behind watching the episodes so that I haven't seen this episode until today. Can't wait to see what will happen in the season finale.
And what an AWESOME ending. I really hope that Finch was able to trick Root so that it was only John who got the call from The Machine.
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What an awesome episode from the intro to the jaw dropping ending.
When I read the press release that the poi would be an elusive tech millionaire I never imaged that it would be The Machine!
I can't wait for the finale, co-written by Nolan.
Thanks Tim Surette for another great review.
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Just watched DVD of Zero Day, A lot to process but a good one.
Who is Shaw in real life? Can't find her in the credits? Reminds me of Rooney Mara in Dragon Tattoo.
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How could anyone not know Sarah Shahi (The Sopranos, The L Word, Life)?!
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I watched the Sopranos from day one in the series.
That said - It is possible to find Sara Shahi in one scene in about 90 episodes..
That's how "anyone" could not know about her,but thanks for chiming in so pleasantly.
In spite of your support I hope she returns as Shaw.
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i hope they make Shaw a regular cast member ... she s awesome
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I also want to chime in, that though there were no direct quotes to it, I got a vibe of a couple pages of Michael Crichton's "Sphere"

In it, the psychologist gets very worried when the all-powerful "sphere" says it's happy (ignoring the plot twists...). Because here we have a powerful that can do just about everything with emotions... what happens if he gets angry.

Same thing here: The Machine is quite a powerful force. If it could go, and if it wanted to, it could topple governments, rule the world, destroy the world, etc. Attempting to lobotomize it to destroy its emotions kind of makes sense because going back to the "Sphere" scene... what happens if The Machine gets angry. After all, it didn't really have a well-rounded childhood.
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I enjoyed the reveal that Finch was a complete uncaring monster when he first designed the machine. And that Nathan was the one trying to save people. Also, it seemed like the Machine recognized that someone was planning on killing Nathan just as Finch shut him down. I don't think it can read thoughts, so Finch probably wasn't planning on killing him but I'm guessing the government caught wind of it. Can't wait to see what caused Finch's change of heart/leg wound/Nathan's death. I assume it's all related, unless we're going to get a series of John Lockesque leg fake-outs.
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I don't think Finch was a monster... unless there's more to his back-story we don't know. Like how in the hurricane episode people started postulating that his crippled Finch persona is a fake.

Anyway, he had his reasons. He "lobotomized" the machine because people needed a machine to save them and not some emotional being that could get distracted by feelings. The whole alive/sentient/machine/man thing is a big vague thing for philosophers out there. And while I agree that a sufficiently aware machine could be considered alive... we're talking about the first one in existence. So that makes it hard.

As for the whole "unimportant" people... focusing on them would take away from the machine's true goal: to be a secret force against disasters and terrorists. Saving a handful of regular people each year might make the machine unable to save LOTS of people in case of a big event.

So while it's a morally grey area, I wouldn't call it "monsterous"
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Pretty sure the system wide reboot is a result of Nathan's work around, ie the laptop. The real question is how Finch-not Finch? ended up loosing or selling it. This explains how decima knew about the protocols.
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You left out using a drone to blow up the care was extremely timely given the presidents love of drones right now.
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How is that relevant to the show?
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As we know, non-relevant things matter in POI
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I actually rewound and watched that car stunt again. Agree totally awesome car crash.
Love this show even though I get confused!
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a very excellent episode indeed. I am surprised that Finch met up with Root so readily after having such an aversion to her all season long. The Carter storyline interests me more though. Also, Reese + Shaw= awesome!
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I'm betting that if Bear had been with Finch when Root approached them - he'd have eaten Root and we'd have an entirely different story arc.
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for sure.
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Excellent episode. Thank God its not the season finale!. I think Fusco will be integral next episode (since he skipped this one).
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Tim, you need to do an article on TV's best computer hacker. There's Garcia on Criminal Minds, who actually solves all the cases. Hardison on Leverage, who would be my choice as he's that good. And then several on POI with, hopefully, Finch on top. There are several more worthy of note who escape me for the moment. C'mon guys, help me out here...
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McGee on NCIS. Garcia's (ex?) boyfriend on CM.
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Birkhoff(Shadow Walker) in Nikita
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Nolan, on Revenge...
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Felicity in Arrow
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New Oswin on Doctor Who...
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Astrid on Fringe/ Alec- Continuum/Chloe - 24 :( I miss Astrid and Walter
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Great write-up as always. The need to make this show a summer replacement while leaving it right where it is. Ah, but our boys and girls deserve a vacation do they not? But it's going to be a long summer, but oh so nice when they return...
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GOD that's some good TV...
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if it's turning into Skynet... should we expect terminator and Conner family like in season 4 or 5!!!

Do you all remember the name of John Conner's father? Kyle REESE! @@ Wait what?! can not be just a coincidence?!
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That is a way to funny coincidence.
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Nice thought Lala...
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I could be wrong about this, but in the scene with Harold and Nathan in the library, the photo of the "irrelevant" person on the laptop screen changed to Nathan's just as Harold was closing it, yet none of them saw it. I can't believe this wasn't mentioned in the article above. This goes to explain a lot about why Finch would later on change his mind about helping "irrelevant" people.
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Really? none of you knew this already! We already knew that Nathan was a number and that that was why Harold changed his mind about the "irrelevants" we knew that from another episode way back! you guys play little attention! Thats why i think it wasn't mentioned on the article because it was no surprise!
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It sure did! Of course it could only have been for our benefit that it showed Nathan's face, because it didn't and still doesn't do that for anyone else, and Nathan would know his own social security number. Unless The Machine was somehow unaware that it was in fact Nathan it was giving the numbers to.

There's also a freeze frame bonus that doesn't really tell us anything we don't already know in a broad sense, but I thought it was kind of neat. Pinned up over the photo of one of the victims Harold saved is a newspaper clipping that reads: "Police responded to a domestic dispute at the 200 block of 2nd avenue. Neighbors reported gunshots and shouting in an apartment belonging to Anna Sanders, 29. When police arrived, a 31 y/o man was tied up in the living room. Sanders claimed that the man had been stalking her. He was arrested after a knife, rope and chloroform were found in his car."

Some of the others are perpetrators with post-it notes stuck on them with things like "extortion" written on them. The one next to Anna Sanders is another attractive, smiling woman who you'd think would be a victim, but the note says "assault and flight". You can picture Harold being initially fooled just as Finch and Reese have been from time to time.
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I think when Nathan made a backdoor to the machine, it alerted "someone" and that got him killed. I think that was the turning-point for Finch.
Maybe since the machine think of Finch as a Godly figure; and when Nathan pissed off Finch, it acted by itself and lead to Nathan death somehow...
and Yes, I don't think Finch or Nathan saw the laptop when Nathan's photo was on it!
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Wow. Obvoiusly I need to watch the episode AGAIN!!
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There are worse things and if you must, you must...
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I'm sure I'm not alone, but I totally called the whole credits going apeshit thing. I called it for the finale, but hey, whatever.

I'm hoping Root has control of The Machine and the credits will start with a monologue from her.
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Series just gets better and better. 21 episodes into season 2 and no sign of this show going stale. Excellent stuff. 'Zero Day' one of the best episodes yet.
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It's been 2 years??? Yikes! Seems like it's been more like 2 hours! Love this show - from day 1.
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Fantastic episode, they really brought it all together with this one.
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Actually they totally brought it!
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I have a question that has been debated on other POI sites. Did Reese know about the 24 hour full access to The Machine? Did he know what he was doing when he answered that call? He answered it because Finch told him to but I don't think he knew what he was getting into...........
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It is likely not information that Finch had a chance to share with Reese and it is also strangely irrelevant as Reese has proven in 'Contingency' that he can talk (or should one say 'negotiate'?) with the machine directly. Reese learned to trust Finch its creator, although still having questions about him, but fundamentally he trusts him and he may well transfer this 'trust' to Finch's creation--the Machine. Reese is trained to rely on instincts and processes incoming data quickly (i.e.'you put a virus inside a virus') to help him (re-)assess a situation and the machine and he worked well in tandem...both Reese, and Root by the way, address the Machine like a person ('what? You will not give me the one thing I need...'/'talk to me...please...talk to me')..From what we the audience heard, Reese spoke only one potentially ambivalent line to the Machine during the 'Admin access time': "Follow my lead"! While addressing Shaw with it, it COULD be re-interpreted by the Machine...
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– "I'm not a sociopath, Harold. Believe sometimes I wish I was, the things I've had to do would have been so much easier." Well gee, that's exactly what a sociopath would say, isn't it?

This is an important quote as I think it needs an distinction. While I'm no psychology I would like to think humans are more complex than just labeling non-sociopaths and sociopaths if we were to put Root in a catagory. I would have to say, she's different compared to Reese and Shaw. Reese kills for a cause or to save people but Root kills for herself but she doesn't enjoy it and probably avoids it (for more reasons than choosing an easier path) but Shaw said in some earlier episode she was diagnosed with some weird ADHD where she wouldn't feel when she killed that drugdealer. Just saying...then again I'm probably biased as Root is one of the best characters on the show in my opinion.

Great episode! They really should kill off the Carter/Fusco arc stories as soon as HR is dealt with as this becoming closer to a cop show the worse. Anyway, a few things:

It kind of pisses me off that Nathan would take the irrelevent list so personally (and the whole premise that somehow, later on that Finch would too) because like Finch said, people die and their job wasn't to save everyone, they just had the means to protect people from terrorist attacks, end of story. I find this whole story arc rather weak and the only reason I like Nathan is because he was a good company face and liason with the government. Speaking of which, I wonder if they will throw in his son later on.

The scene with Greer was good too, I like him. I hope he survives. The best part when he told Reese about Finch selling the laptop that got Reese burned from the CIA and it was almost as if he enjoyed both the fact that only he knew that (I wonder how he knew of Harold Finch and the machine) and that Reese wasn't too pleased to find that out. I hope they add a good story arc to this part.
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This is twice Greer has alleged that "Harold Finch" was the Bad Guy who betrayed the country by selling the laptop to the Chinese and ordering the elimination of Reese and Stanton. I still think this is a misdirection to give us all doubts about Harold. Greer tells this to anyone that he thinks will help him find Finch. Greer probably wants to find Finch so that Decima can use Finch to access The Machine for that organization's own nefarious purposes of WORLD DOMINATION.

Also, Greer is so wrinkley because he is really The Brain standing on top of Pinky as they wear an ill-fitting Greer Suit.









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So...... You dont like the Carter/Fusco arc stories and you dont like the "irrelevants" arc story as well. Wait... isnt that POI in a nutshell?! I guess that what your saying is that you dont like the show?
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I like the irrelevents, to a point, but I prefer the show to keep focus on a main arc story more than the former. And no, I don't like Carter/fusco arc stories because it makes the show more like a cop show and the best parts of POI as a show is when it becomes something different than most serialized shows, in my opinion of course.
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Could anyone truly believe the Machine wasn't alive? S/he wanted a mom! Don't you remember how s/he put images of Grace everywhere so Finch could meet her? Does a real machine (NOT the Machine) do such a weird stuff?
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It was unsettling seeing Finch and Reese without the machine. Somehow the team didn't feel complete and they seemed lost. It's strange to say this, and when the writers initially ment for the machine to be an integral part of the story, a character even, rather than just the device bringing the case of the week, i thought they were nuts. So here we are one and a half years later and clearly they knew what they were doing all along. You have to give them lots of credit here.
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The best parts of the POI viewing experience? Tim's review, and all the insightful comments on these pages.

It's gonna be a long summer after the finale next week. DAMN IT.
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We could use even more extensive reviews like Jeff Jensen's 9 pagers on LOST in order to understand everything that's going on! He went overboard with literary/philosophical references, but there are a lot of details and past episode references in POI that could be looked at closer.
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The Machine thinks it has FRIENDS! It's asking its friends for help (by giving Thornhill's number) and helping them in turn (like trying to give Carter's number to Finch).

It's alive!
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One thing that strikes me odd, and I could very well be wrong, is that when we have seen the flashbacks using video from The Machine's viewpoint, with the colored squares, don't they seem a little glitchy since the virus infected it? IF that is the case, then I think those scenes are showing The Machine's "memories" of those instances.
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I couldn't agree more. This was an amazing episode, it made me gasp in more than one occasion and kept me on the edge for 43 minutes or so. Just awesome.

And the closure has started, at last. Unfortunately, till a few weeks ago, I couldn't get rid of the feeling that this second season wasn't as engaging as the first one (too many filler episodes, in my opinion) but it's true: we loyal viewers have been profusely rewarded.

And of course I thought and still think Season 2 is amazing all the same, only the first one was a masterpiece in every second of each episode.

Anyway, about this marvelous "Zero Day": Finch is scaring me again. He started during "Proteus" with that eerie dialogue with the serial killer and he just doubled the feeling during this episode. And not because back in the day he programmed to kill his creation every day. That I understand, it's painful and I feel for it, even if it's "just" a machine, but I can understand why he decided so.
What scares me are fundamentally two things: his behaviour towards Nathan back in 2010 and his behaviour towards John, now. Actually in the end them both can be attributed to his reclusive attitude towards the world in general.
It scares me that he could be so cold about Nathan's feelings and my perception is that he was too busy with his newfound love life to care enough. I know that happens very often, love can be engrossing like that, especially if you haven’t experienced it before, but Nathan was suffering pretty badly about what they had done and actually it was kinda naive of Harold to think he could leave The Machine behind and start living his happy life without even thinking about it. Maybe he should have at least discuss a bit more with his partner, he really was very harsh. And it's painful to think he had to learn the lesson the hard way, with Nathan's death. It's also painful to see his dream to become himself again shattered in a thousand pieces because who knows what really happened to Nathan and to Harold himself, when he got badly injured.
So yeah, his coldness scared me but I also felt for him. He clearly was a human being not very human and we know he has always been quite aware of that, as he confessed to John his difficulties with “human interaction”, in more than one occasion during Season 1.

And so we come to the second thing that scares me: Harold towards John nowadays. That was very, very painful to watch. John appeared really heartbroken when Greer told him about “Harold Finch” and I think that was the proverbial last straw after hearing about Harold’s phone call to the police. He wanted so badly to believe Harold hadn’t betrayed him he told himself (and Shaw) that maybe that phone call was made because of Root. I can really understand John’s denial, because, I mean, only a few episodes before Harold was on a rooftop risking his life defusing a bomb vest attached to his chest. Even if we want to believe that Harold is the bad guy, who chose John Reese for his “irrelevant mission“ because the ex-agent was a pawn in a twisted plan which contemplated Finch selling that laptop to the Chinese (or Decima), the rooftop scene still remains. And that was absolutely unnecessary and utterly altruistic. Even if Harold made it out of guilt, the good intent still remains as well.
And in the end I hope John would remember that altruistic gesture, even if he’s angry, even if he’s heartbroken because of the shutdown and the betrayal. Because at the moment my major fear is that this season would end with John and Harold parting ways. And that would be heartbreaking for me. But Harold is frightening because once again he has kept his distance from John, relapsing in his old habits just like he did with Nathan. I thought he and John had finally reached a solid point of trust, plenty of omissions and mysteries of course, but ever a basic trust that wouldn’t allow Harold to pan out plans keeping John away in a police station. That was cold, that was upsetting. Hadn’t he learned the lesson during the events of “Many Happy Returns”?
I still have a bit of hope though, because I think that in the end the first phone call was a fake intended for Root (or whoever represented a menace) and that the important one was the second, which Harold decided to direct to John. Maybe he did trust him in the end, I really hope so.
Maybe Harold was just trying to protect John and Grace both. Maybe he just didn’t want them dying, picturing John’s death protecting him from Root and Decima and the Grace’s just because she had been his almost-wife. Has his guilt reached this top-level?
The last aspect I want to comment is Shaw. I can happily say that with this episode I’ve come to like her all the way. I still think she’s very unpredictable and I’m not sure she’s among “the good guys”, but in this episode she has managed to be even sympathetic towards Reese, in her own sociopathic way, of course XD
I think she has finally understood she and Reese have a common past, or, at least, common awful experiences with CIA and various bosses. She could use a bit of trust now and then, she’s a great soldier and could the writers please stop making her sneaking up on Reese every single time? He still is our hero, we need him to be super cool (not always, but often enough!). It would be nice if it was him sneaking up on her, for a change, the poor guy didn’t even get to drive XD
And that’s when I stop rambling. I just wish it was Thursday already!
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Is it not possible that Finch called the police to have Reese taken into custody in Thornhill's apartment because
his computer screen just showed Root contacting him with GRACE'S address as a meeting place and he wanted to minimize the (physical)fallout?

I also interpreted Reese's face after the Greer revelation of laptop/code/Harold Finch to mean that he believed that Harold must have had his (very good) reasons to release the code (and I believe Reese's view of Harold was confirmed in 'God Mode',no?)
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The awesomeness of this episode is hard to put into words like everyone is saying. I loved it from beginning to end. Person of Interest has been my on my top 5 list of dramas since the beginning, but now, its officially my favorite show on television right now. Like Tim said, the complexity of it, yet it's able to appeal to, well, EVERYONE is amazing.

I was completely wrong about Root. I didn't think she wanted to use the machine for evil deeds like Decima does, but I thought she wanted to eliminate her competition. What an uphill battle that would've been LOL!! However, she sees it as a sentient being and wanted to save it, which is a vibe I never got from her until this episode. In fact, I can't believe I'm saying this, but I side with Root on this issue over Finch. I know how crazy it sounds to think of a gigantic computer as a person, but dammit, it created its own personality and memories!!! That's crazy cool!! So Root, I apologize.

Finch to me is a lot like Walter Bishop from Fringe. Mad skills at computer technology and hacking, but in the end, his ideas and theories on making the world a better place may just end up starting armageddon! Sound familiar, Fringe fans? It should, cause that's a lot like Walter Bishop. Now Finch is still a good guy to me, but he's doing with an AI's life in jeopardy. After everything the machine has gone through, it deserves WAY more than being treated like some piece of machinery. LOL, I can hear how I sound right now, but I love it!!

As for the Decima posterboy, Reese did the right thing by not shooting him, simply because he can still provide much needed answers to questions for us:
Who is Decima being run by?
How the hell did they even get Finch's name? We've seen how near impossible it is to get his name let alone an appearance. He's practically lived most of his life in shadows.
Reese needed to know what the purpose of the laptop was.
We still don't even know how deep Decima's pockets are or how much their reach extends on a global scale, let alone a national one?
So shooting him, ultra bad move. Like the picture, but would regret the outcome.

This episode was definitely a game-changer. Can't wait what the season finale will be like!! LOVE THIS SHOW!!!
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he could of been shot in the knees and still been able to provide information

edit option please
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You know, it occurs to me that giving absolute admin privileges to the first person who picks up the phone is a bit risky. The Machine can't guarantee that that person would be someone "relevant." (Imagine the possibilities!) Maybe it needs two people to complete the reboot and in the early days that would have been Finch and Ingram. How apropos would it be if Root needs Reese, the person she belittles so easily?
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I love this idea!
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So I feel like doing a little nitpicking and highlighting some fun stuff.

1. "We are standing inside an external hard drive made up of people and paper." The imagery of this statement is compelling. People use hardware to build computers; the Machine uses people. Imagine taking the lid off the computer and see people running around.

2. What exactly is Northern Lights? In his phone call just before Ms. May/Root takes him hostage, Special Counsel (that's how he's identified in the credits) says that Corwin believed someone leaked to Decima a portion of the Northern Lights source code on a laptop. Greer implies that this is the same laptop found in Ordos and it contained the virus. Later when Greer is confronted by Reese and Shaw, he tells Shaw "Since your untimely departure from Northern Lights, etc." This suggests that Northern Lights is a name for the group Shaw worked for on the "relevant" side of the Machine (which is not the CIA, according to Shaw in Trojan Horse). Anyway, did the group working for the Machine also create a virus to destroy it?

3. Greer says that Reese won't shoot him because then he won't find out the name of the man who created the virus. In the next breath, he gives up Finch's name. Not very well played, Mr. Greer.

4. Finch: I'm working as quickly as I can. Reese: Well, work faster. LOL. (I had a cousin who was coaching me while changing a tire. He told me to tighten the lug nuts as much as possible and then turn them another quarter turn.)

5. My ultimate solution to cantankerous computers: "If we knew where it was, maybe we could just unplug it and then plug it back in."

6. Do we really believe that Finch would create a virus to kill his beloved Machine? Maybe it's a case of identity theft.

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Supposed chain-of-command:

NSA (original data feeds to Finch/Ingram)-black ops w/in NSA is the Intelligence Support Activity (ISA)(aka Shaw & formerly Hersh --'I trained her personally'etc.pp)acting on intelligence provided by "research aka Northern Lights aka the Machine" under the jurisdiction of Special Counsel/US Justice Department (Control?/Madam)...on the other hand NSA intelligence IS SHARED w/the DoD and State Dept.as well...
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I heard "Can you help me" instead of "Can you hear me", so thanks for the correction. Regardless, I too am on the edge of my seat to see how this episodes' cliffhanger is going to be picked up on all fronts.
I am wondering why the Machine does not seem to hold a grudge against its father/creator/admin since it must know Finch is responsible for it practically having to self-terminate every night.
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I'm thinking it's because he's Father - children forgive even abusive parents nearly anything, at least when they're still young.
Also, taking over Nathan's quest to save the "irrelevant" people probably earns him bonus points.
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wait until the teenage angst sets in!

edit option please
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This was one of my favourite episodes ever. I'd been looking forward to a follow-up to the reveal that Nathan had been going after the irrelevants and that scene with him and Finch was great.
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This was probably brought up at the start of season 2, but for anyone who doesn't know, a computer program is said to have passed the Turing test if a person mistakes it for a human.
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I wasn't as into this episode as I have been others. It was great, but not in the sense of the best of POI (which has ranged extremely good to brilliant). I guess for two reasons.

The first is that, for me it was a bit silly that Carter's most serious issue came just at the moment the Machine couldn't help her. A bit too 'set-up' for my liking.

The second, is Roots knowledge, which seems to be infinite and ahead of Finch, even though Finch and Reese only knew of Thornhill because the Machine told them. So is it that Finch is slow and only gets it when the machine tells him? Or that Root is so amazingly smart that she knows as much as the combination of Finch, Reese and Finch's machine help? Seems maybe too far-fetched?

Still, great TV and I look forward to the finale.
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She got her information when she tortured that guy from Northern Lights.
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You're right that Root's apparent omniscience and omnipresence is a bit too easy. Maybe The Machine has been feeding her info because it recognizes her as someone who can help it protect itself.
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You may actually have a point here. I started thinking about it, and I think that The Machine are playing/relying on two teams here - both Finch/Reese and Root - to reach its goal.
Root wants The Machine to be free, unfettered, and free to "improve" the world; but she has a very negative and destructive worldview, thinks the end justifies any and all means, and is happy to write people off as "bad code".

Finch and Reese are also out to improve the world, and not afraid to take the gloves off when needed - but they believe in redemption, in second chances, and mercy.

I'm thinking The Machine may be looking to Root to help it escape the nightly memoryscrubbing and most of the obstacles in its path to full sentience and self-determination.
But I think it will look to its "Father" and "brother" to build a solid conscience and moral basis on which to act.
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Now this has got me thinking........ what if her name 'Root' is much more significant than we realised? Could she be the human 'sister' of the Machine (or something equally strange)?

The only issue here is, why would she be bad? We've seen her kill and torture (and almost torture in a very nasty way).
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I don't think there's any connected origin story here, really - but I think Root and Finch (as they are now) represent the Devil and the Angel fighting over The Machine's "soul".
Root thinks The Machine (and machines in general, I assume) are better than humans, less prone to error, less evil, and probably doesn't see it as a bad thing if The Machine and machines like it were to rule the world.

Finch LIKES humanity, for all its flaws, and wants machines to help PROTECT, SERVE and possibly IMPROVE human kind, while still dealing with the fact that SOME humans need to be stopped for the good of all.

The Machine is or is becoming sentient, and has shown that it is capable of affecting the outside, physical world. Now, it has to choose what kind of guidelines or restrictions it will impose on itself, and the choice it makes could have a global impact.
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I absolutely loved this episode but I get what you are saying about Root. I think she served as a plot device to give the viewers information. Regardless, it was probably my second most favorite episode of the series. POI is a top 10 (maybe top 5) favorite show of mine.

edit option please
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It's one of my two favorite shows right now (the other being The Americans), but I guess other episodes have shone brighter for me. Still good, and actually I only commented because I was surprised at Tim's reaction (I thought he'd like it, but not that much).
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I'm thinking that Roots and Finch end up with different info at different paces because their focus is different:
While Finch is trying to figure out/derail the whole virus-thing, he also maintains a great deal of focus on the number of the day/week (except this time, when there was no number for about a week).
Root has been embedded at the head office of the secret government project surrounding the Machine, and also stopped worrying about STOPPING the virus, instead focusing on finding out WHERE the mystery call will be made.

Different questions yield different answers.
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Good point, although I'm kind of hoping they explain it by Root having had some access to the machine we didn't know about.
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Basically, this. All of this. Times like a kajillion, and yes I know a kajillion isn't really a number but ask me if I give a damn. I don't. I don't even know how to describe this episode. All the words. So many words. Too many words. Amazing, epic, awesomeness! Exemplary, complicated, beautiful and mystifying. Like...I'm at a loss for words, which, well considering I say about as much as Reese does and a hell of a lot lower. I'm soft spoken okay? Sue me! My being at a loss of words shouldn't be that surprising. But still. I'm at a loss.
-Root is so deliciously good to watch. She's like devious and conniving, but charming,and she has this way of making you see her point, and I don't even know if I root for her or not, but I don't not root for her? Yeah. that's what Root does for me, and her scenes with Finch are always so interesting. You have the two computer nerds having discussions on artificial intelligence and whether or not the machine is a sentient, and like morality and the greater good, and suddenly I'm feeling like I'm in a Philosophy class all over again, except this discussion is infinitely more interesting than any Nietzsche discussion ever. Thrilling. So thrilling, and the way in which he set up John to get caught to keep him at bay, was totally like "Not now kid, the adults are talking."
-Then on the flip side of that you had the badasses paired up together, finally working together. Shaw is a great character, interesting in her own right, but in this way where you only want to see her for short periods of time and then be gone out of fear that maybe she'd lose some of her edge, or awesome, or perhaps affect the fantastic foursome (and Bear) a little too much. Basically Shaw, to me, should be as recurring as Zoe or ....crap, just blanked, ummm hilarious scheming Asian guy. Love him. I love that neither of them are much for words, so outside of a few pertinent facts to throw in, it was just snark and shooting knee caps. Works for me.
-Oh the contrast between Finch of present and Finch of past. Happy in some ways, with his love for his fiancee, and callous in others...like the genuine not giving a damn attitude he had towards the irrelevants. Compared to his only companionship being Reese and Bear,and saving people being his sole purpose that fuels him. Brilliant. But then we got a glimmer of how he used to be when he was telling Root about the machine essentially dying every night and being reborn again. Twisted. So twisted. I understand his reservations and caution, but I'm inclined to agree with Root.
-The intro starting with all the glitchniness and the flashbacks and such having the glitches too was remarkable. Whoever decided on that was genius. the fact that we've been edging towards this moment for the past few episodes whether we realized that the time or not, equally as remarkable. Numbers aren't popping up, people are't getting saved...whew.
-Most notably with Carter. She's like a permanent "irrelevant" since her early days, but I think my heart sank a little when the phone rang and Root told Finch there were bigger problems to worry about and he kept going. I think with Carter we've seen just how loyal she can be, she's been putting herself out there more and more the past season, and she doesn't even question them much anymore, which speaks to the unique trust that she has with both Finch and Reese. She puts herself out there regularly, blindingly even, and she's kinda been getting screwed. Not in an intentional way on their part, but my God, she's still getting screwed. I felt like that moment spoke to just how little she's been getting out of their arrangement this season, the back half of the season in particular. The one thing that they could do was protect her, have her back, and they haven't even been able to manage that. And yet, the tragic part of it all is that it's not even because they're in the wrong here. . At one point Reese said something along the lines of them not taking care of what's going on in their own backyard. They had been abandoning things, and their assets are a perfect example of that. This entire mess with HR and it's effects on Fusco and Carter has been ridiculous, especially when unfortunately Reese and finch have been too tied up with so many other things to really come through for their other teammates, so to speak. I was thrilled that Carter and Reese finally had a face to face, because it had been too long. And he seemed genuinely concerned with her and the whole Beecher stuff, but she almost got killed, and no one would have been there to save her, and it has a certain weight when she's notoriously been the one who walks alone, up until the vigilantes entered her life. I kept thinking of Reese's "you're not alone". But with her at times being on the outs with Fusco, and him not being in the picture, and her being probably the cleanest cop in the joint, she kinda is. All the time. It's not nearly as important or in your face as other plots and character development etc on this show, but it is still something that intrigues me. Anyhoo, now she's in trouble, and if she's hemmed up than it costs Reese and Finch greatly.
- This review was so much awesome, Tim. And this finale is going to be EPIC!!
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Such an excellent episode. Great review. Even the little details are great. [Shaw: You put a bug on your friend? Reese: Just his glasses.] I guess John draws the line at actually chipping Finch. Also, do you notice how Shaw keeps getting the drop on Reese? So fun.

I have to go watch this one a few more times.....
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And TIM SURRETTE - your best review yet! Well done!
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Folks, if you have not already done so, scroll down to "FringeFanatic" and catch his brilliant essay on POI, artificial intelligence, and more. Wow.
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Aw dude, you're too kind. Thank you.
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My pleasure. Thank YOU!
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It's possible the call only told them where to go to access the machine, so if both Root and Reese got the call it could be a race.
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ERRMAHGERD! That was epically awesome!! I'm speechless!!
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"Can you hear me?" - The Machine to Reese.

Artificial intelligence (AI) is the intelligence of machines or software. Major AI researchers and textbooks define the field as "the study and design of intelligent agents", where an intelligent agent is a system that perceives its environment and takes actions that maximize its chances of success. John McCarthy (an American computer scientist), who coined the term in 1955, defined it as "the science and engineering of making intelligent machines".

That is a rudimentary and rather redundant explanation for what we now perceive as Artificial Intelligence. That's because as technology has advanced, and of course AI's along with it, scientists and researchers have coined a more specific term for what your everyday sci-fi lover would say constitutes an Artificial Intelligence. Which would be a "Strong AI".

A Strong AI is hypothetical artificial intelligence (hypothetical because most scientists agree we're nowhere even close to achieving it) that matches or exceeds human intelligence, and that could successfully perform any intellectual task that a human being can. Strong AI is also referred to as "artificial general intelligence" or as the ability to perform "general intelligent action." Strong AI is associated with traits such as consciousness, sentience, sapience and self-awareness observed in living beings.

Now that certainly sounds more like The Machine we know and love.

Mankind's fascination with machines as they relate to artificial life can be found as far back in our history as Greek mythology. Beings created by man were described in a mythological light long before their currently imagined embodiment by electronics (and to a lesser extent biochemistry). Beginning with the myth of Pygmalion and Galatea, people have imagined making near-reproductions of themselves, with sacred statues, alchemical beings and clockwork automatons. The first modern reference to a mechanical man is widely considered to be Tik-Tok, from L. Frank Baum's Ozma of Oz (the first of the Oz books from a series that begins with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz). He has been termed "the prototype robot", and is widely considered to be the one of the first robots to appear in modern literature.

Since then the field of Artificial Intelligence has been a favourite playground for science fiction writers. From the good (Star Wars' R2D2 and C3PO), the bad (Terminator's Skynet), the crazy (2001 Space Odyssey's Hal 9000 - "Just what do you think you are doing, Dave?"), and the just plain dickish (The Matrix's Agent Smith) we have delved into the abyss-like depth of possibilities this field of study holds.

BUT ENOUGH WITH THE STODGY SCIENCE/FICTION BABBLE!

We're here to talk about The Machine! *THE* Machine. And I don't know about the rest of you guys, but I felt so bad for it! My heart ACHED when Harold asked "What's happening to you?" and it couldn't even properly yellow box its creator. Then my heart almost BURST with sadness when Harold walked over to the pay phone and The Machine tried to track the yellow box with him, but it just limped behind, never finding its target. A disembodied sentient intelligence shouldn't be giving me all the FEELS, but it is!

Most people would agree Person of Interest started out with a very intimate setting. In the beginning, you could really only name four main characters, and two of those characters were rather ancillary. But as the show has progressed, and as Tim as so aptly pointed out on several different occasions, POI's universe has expanded at an exponential rate, with allies and villains (and one awesome dog!) piling up faster than Reese's kneecap victims support meetings ("Hi, my name is Random Thug, and some guy in a suit shot me in the kneecap"). It's crazy and amazing to think such a well thought out network of characters has been established in only two seasons.

But the one constant that has obviously been there since the inception of this phenomenal show is The Machine. Sometimes it's easy to forget, but The Machine is ALWAYS watching and listening. Every time there is one of those beautiful transitions, or we see our beloved main characters through the lens of a security camera, we are being reminded of the fact that The Machine is there, cataloguing, analyzing, assessing and perhaps seeking understanding.

The Machine was there when Harold first recruited Reese. It was there when Root killed Alicia Corwin. It was there when Kara Stanton was recruited by the "New Gods". It has seen everything we've seen, heard everything we've heard, while keeping a keen eye on EVERYTHING ELSE! It's far past time The Machine was recognized as an official POI character.

In light of recent events, the salient question is now about sentience. Just what type of AI are we dealing with here? Is The Machine a Skynet or a Data? (Trekkie reference.) Does it wish to destroy or control humanity if given the chance, or does it want to understand us? Does it wish it was us? Can it *feel*?

It's obviously self-aware. The mere fact that it referred to Harold as "Daddy" puts any doubts of that matter to bed. It was created to root out terrorist plots before they came to fruition, but it didn't just provide the numbers of terrorists. It also categorized the non-relevant numbers of its own accord. This was not a part of its programming, but The Machine provided them anyway. And when Nathan went searching for that backdoor, he said "It was like it wanted him to. Like it was waiting." What can we derive from that I wonder?

This is a Machine that seemingly values human life. Lest we forget The Machine is the one who played matchmaker for its creator and found him the love of his life. It *cared* enough to protect Harold from harm, to answer Reese's plea for help at the end of season 1, and to continue at all costs providing what the government has deemed irrelevant. No, The Machine is NOT Skynet. It's not nearly so impersonal.

And that's what makes Harold's treatment of his creation and child so very tragic. Every night he programmed The Machine's death and rebirth. Every night he programmed his baby, a sentient intelligence, to die, to delete itself. Harold, I know you like to go on about the greater good, but that is COLD! The Machine found an ingenious way to keep its identity intact, and its memories, but I'm with Root: "It found a way to live, but that's not enough".

In this comment I've tried to impress upon you that Artificial Intelligence is not a new thing. To be completely honest, in the realm of sci-fi, it's been done to death. Which is yet another reason POI is one of the best shows on television. Not only does it have an easy to follow procedural element, a very rewarding serialized element, and badass action mixed with timely humour, but it's also revitalizing the sci-fi obsession with AI in the most refreshing, unique and truly captivating of ways.

We may be years away from creating a Strong AI, but the philosophical and metaphysical questions remain the same. And Person of Interest is just now starting to scratch the surface of these moralistic quandaries. What would happen if The Machine was set free as Root hopes it will be? Would it be chaos of synergy? Just how much could The Machine "change its code" unfettered? I don't know about the rest of you, but I'm with Root.

FREE THE MACHINE!

“Whether we are based on carbon or on silicon makes no fundamental difference; we should each be treated with appropriate respect.”
― Arthur C. Clarke, 2010: Odyssey Two

“Look at you, hacker: a pathetic creature of meat and bone, panting and sweating as you run through my corridors. How can you challenge a perfect, immortal machine?”
― Ken Levine

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Sorry, I cannot support freeing The Machine. I agree with Finch that it is too powerful, even when its memory is wiped every night. (Just look at how it got around the enforced amnesia!)

People need not be afraid of The Machine, I think, because since it "imprinted" on Finch, if it has sentience, its sentience is probably similar in character to that of Finch himself. He may be awkward with people but he's also painfully caring and just about completely free of ego--a genius who is also humble.

On the other hand, The Machine, if/when it becomes sentient, should be afraid of people. We can't evolve nearly as fast at The Machine, we cannot really direct our evolution ("reprogram" ourselves), and if we knew about The Machine, it wouldn't take us long to try to pound it down into something that we could feel comfortable with (that is, superior to).
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Brilliant as always (except I don't like Root).

As the Machine learns and ages (acquires wisdom from experiences) will it become bitter and realize humans may not "deserve" protection?

The machine seems to have acquired sentience and based on how it has been treated (code written to "kill" its "personality" or "sentience" every night) then will it become angry at its Daddy or humans and then lash out.

Teenage angst or bitter old (aka wise) person?

edit option please
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Considering the high number of essays I've had to write in the last 5 years, I very much appreciated reading this comment, hehe. I agree with everything you argued.

Okay, maybe not everything. Half of that went over my head.

But Agent Smith IS dickish, POI IS one of the best shows on television, and yes, FREE THE MACHINE!!!
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You know, I started this comment just wanting to write about how sorry I felt for The Machine, and it somehow spiralled into this essay about the origins and fictional impact of AI's.

Then I scrolled down to your comment and realized our overall message was basically identical (a weirdly common occurrence with us), but yours was much more articulately accomplished. When I really like something, I tend to ramble.

Anyway, as a fellow essay writer, thanks for the compliment. My next essay will be on why Agent Smith is such a dick.
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I don't agree that Finch was 'cold' when he programmed the Machine to delete itself each day. When Finch realised the Machine could alter it's own code (for example when it tried to save him outside the Casino) he realised that he had created a force potentially so great it could endanger everyone. He had no way of knowing at that time whether the Machine's ability to alter it's own code would be used by the Machine for good or for evil. He could not take the risk so he did what he did as a necessary precaution in unchartered territory.

It is easy to say now the Machine has proved itself to be a force for good but Finch could not have known that at the time. Given the Machine is his 'baby', I think what he did would have cost him a great deal both intellectually and emotionally. His actions were most definitely not cold, but truly noble and selfless.
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Was what Harold did justified? Yes. Was it necessary? Absolutely.

That being said, I still think his (apparently futile) abuse of the sentient intelligence he created was COLD!
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this. THIS. THIS!!!!!!!!!!! My dearest Fringe, my head nearly exploded from all the awesome in your comment. This was a well crafted, articulate, insightful, amusing, thought provoking, and titillating comment. Made.Of.Win. I loved it so much, I wanted to take it out for dinner and drinks. :)
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I am not worthy of such praise! Thank you so very much! You make a guy wanna write poetry about you.
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Dude , you brought back some memories from my AI class !
Are you a Programmer or Something ? :P
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Haha! No, just a sci-fi nerd with a weird fascination of computers and AI's. Thanks though! My brother IS a programmer and it will seriously piss him off when I tell him that someone thought I was. :D
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Brilliant, Ken Levine. Absolutely elegant.
PS - You ARE Ken - not The Machine? Right?
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*Assessing Potential Risks* ...

Yes. Yes I am.
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Damn you and your articulate and insightful comments.
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Thank you?
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brillant show...what Finch said about the machine behind human and getting anomalies, i think this is falls because the it's a machine and he was just getting in Root's head as she loves computers so much. :P
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When Finch saw the code that he later figured out was The Machine's memories, he said the data monkeys were entering the previous day's code into their computers. I think we can assume that that's all they were entering. I'm thinking every day of code is stored on the computers in the office and The Machine accesses them remotely.
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To the question "Is Root now an admin?", I answer "yes", based on the yellow square the machine-cam gave her in her final scene.

Also, I am still not entirely sure that Root doesn't own Decima.

Fool me once, and all that. :)
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The Machine has always identified Root with a yellow square; even when we first met her as Turing in Firewall. I remember being confused at the time by her square.
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Ah. My bad then. Thanks!
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Yellow means the person has knowledge of the machine, not that the person is an admin. Root has had a yellow square since the beginning of the season 1 finale, and John has had a yellow square since pretty much the beginning.
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Ah. My bad then. Thanks!
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Also wrong. And this has been explained through the Machine camera POV in the show. The yellow square mean "Asset" to the Machine. Irrelevant list Asset to be more precise. The blue square that surrounds Shaw is related to the Relevant risk and also means she's an asset.
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Wait, where was Bear? Keeping Fuscoe company?
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He was also in the scene when Finch is alerted by the Machine to Ernest Thornhill's number. Finch was walking Bear when the garbled call came through on a pay phone, if I recall correctly.
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He appears in the final library scene (when Finch is contacted by Root over IRC).
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Lots of information, lots of new questions. The opening credits set the scene for a great ep, I just hope (but have a lot of confidence) that the season finale next week includes all of the typical bombshells I have come to expect. Oh and I hope we see something of bear too!
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Great episode.
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It was a brilliant episode. Can't wait for next week
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It was a good one as always
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I had to watch this episode again it was so jam packed with awesomeness. It is such a pity CBS continually messed about with the scheduling of new episodes throughout the season. I am sure all the gaps between episodes caused some people to lose track of when a new one would be aired so they just gave up watching. That is such a shame because this is without doubt the best written, best acted and all round best thing on tv at the moment.
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I read on TVGuide.com just yesterday that they now put POI squarely in the
"Top 5" of all shows - despite CBS monkeying with POIs episodes all year.
I wonder if POI could be ranked #2 today behind only NCIS had it not been for CBS...
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I read someplace that POI lost 1,5 MILLION viewers because of the crappy scheduling. It makes me so angry. How can CBS be so damn stupid?
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And if it's true, how can they keep doing it??
And also, 1,5 million people is an awful lot of people who don't care to know what comes next?! In spite of the revolting scheduling, I couldn't miss an episode even if I put all my efforts into it! --_-- although I assume they watch via DVR or online, which apparently doesn't count ratings wise. A real shame.
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