ReacTV pays you to watch ads

Since the advent of the DVR, advertisers have been scrambling to find a way to make you watch their ads. ReacTV has a solution--pay you.

ReacTV, a startup company created by real estate maven Frank Maggio, will offer viewers the chance to watch TV and win money by interacting with the ads they see. The advertisers will make use of a watcher's ad-viewing habits, much like Neilsen ratings system, or a focus group.

Each "game" consists of a 10-minute round divided into two parts. The first part is a trivia game (presumably dealing with ads and products), while in the second half viewers watch ads and answer questions about them. At the end of every hour, a "winner" is announced and sent a cash prize.

The company has created a remote control unit that connects to the Internet and sends your viewing information back to ReacTV. The remote can also scan bar codes of print and TV ads, as well as UPC codes on products.

In addition to creating a marketing-based game, the company has also created oodles of marketing lingo that normal, everyday people don't, or at least shouldn't, use.

ReacTV is billing itself as the first "Gaming Channel TV InterNetwork." The remote control device is called the "ReactiveRemote" or "REMO(TM)," and sends the "CRAV(TM) Reactive Ad System" information back to ReacTV's "Information Gathering Network."

With its love for marketing jargon, ReacTV might quiz viewers on the fast food ad wherein a suburban mother asks her daughter, "Did you purchase that food product at a casual dining establishment?"

A recent study shows that the once prominent 30-second TV ad is losing its potency. The advent of the DVR has given TV viewers the opportunity to fast-forward past commericals, leaving advertisers to come up with new ways to promote products.

Reality shows have been fertile ground for advertising cross-promotion, with Fox's American Idol featuring gratuitous sponsorship promos for Coca-Cola and Ford Motors. NBC's The Apprentice hawks almost any product on store shelves.

Some TV shows have even worked products into their storylines. The Montecito Casino, the fictional location of NBC's Las Vegas, has an Aston Martin store inside of it. On Felicity, the title character worked in a Dean & DeLuca outlet.

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Jan 09, 2012
ca someone explain to me how this work please i just sign up

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Mar 16, 2011
but i do not thinck that people use tivo just for that what's the mater whith waching some ads it wont take more than a few minits
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Apr 13, 2006
sounds like a cool idea. I think people use Tivo to skip commercials because there is no incentive to watch them. But people would be willing to watch a small number of targeted ads if there was real reason to watch them. If this company is really going to give away prizes, I imagine there would be alot of people who would play their games.
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Apr 12, 2006
from a marketing standpoint, I think it's genius! Times are changing, and advertisers need to keep up with the changes. This sounds like a great way to do it! It'll be interesting to see how it works out.
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Apr 12, 2006
Sounds like one of those scams, like "Get Paid To Shop!" or something. I mean, they aren't going to definitely give you money for watching commercials, they've made a game out of it. How sad. Couldn't they bring back good game shows like Fun House or Arcade?

People don't watch commercials for a reason. I don't, and I don't feel as if I'm missing anything. I don't need some lame actor telling me what products to buy. All commercials do is waste time.
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Apr 11, 2006
sounds interesting
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Apr 11, 2006
blech, gimme a break please. tivo is popular for a reason.

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