RIP Karl Malden: A Legendary Life

Not again.

Yes, another iconic figure has left us. Academy Award-winning actor Karl Malden died today at his house in Brentwood, Calif. at age 97. Though he made it big on the big screen as Father Barry in Elia Kazan's On the Waterfront and Mitch Mitchell in Kazan's A Streetcar Named Desire (the Oscar-winning role), and appeared in over 50 movies, he was a stoic presence on the small screen, too. Malden portrayed Det. Lt. Mike Stone on the show The Streets of San Francisco, which ran from 1972-1977 and co-starred a green Michael Douglas as his partner. The series, which ran on ABC, earned much critical acclaim and presented a unique, intelligent take on the crime drama genre that was already running wild with shows like Hawaii Five-O, Barnaby Jones and Kojak.

Malden starred in the short-lived drama Skag, where he played the title character, a foreman named Pete Skagska. The show was cancelled during its first season in 1980. He also provided the pipes behind the American Express slogan, "Don't leave home with out it!" Most recently, he had a small part on The West Wing.

When Karl Malden was born in 1912, the film industry was just getting on its feet and television hadn't even been invented yet. Edwin S. Porter's breakthrough film The Great Train Robbery was just nine years old and people went to the movies to get their news. Over the course of his life, Malden adapted effortlessly to the technological, stylistic and cultural changes that these two mediums imposed. His understated grace made him a star -- he won both an Oscar and an Emmy (for TV mini-series Fatal Vision) -- but as an actor he seemed hugely underused in the starring role. And yet he never sought glitzy recognition in an industry that survives on self-indulgence. As noted in Variety, New York Times critic Herbert Mitgang said it best: "Malden represents the serious actor who had triumphed over what was once considered the greatest handicap -- lack of glamour."

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Yes, he has told his fans about this matter on his ****Richpassion com**** blog too. It is a millionaire dating club and free for 3 months.
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He was a wonderful actor, you forgot to mention his turns as a villian with Marlon Brando in One Eyed Jacks and with Steve McQueen, but I can't remamber the name of that movie. Good-Bye Karl we'll miss you
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What a career! He was the epitome of the character actor. Streets was one of my favorites, Buddyboy. :)
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He was a great underappreciated talent. But I will always remember him as the crook in Hotel and for his American Express commercials. Classic!
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He is a lgend he will be missed
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I have seen Karl’s work many times in many movies, but the performance I will always remember was his portrayal of Omar Bradley in "Patton." He held his own with George C. Scott, and that was no mean trick indeed. I am a professional actor, myself, and I know that the best thing one can say of an actor's work is that he was believable while being interesting. I never saw Karl when he was not both of those simultaneously. Karl almost lived long enough to attain "geezer" status. So, in spite of dying "young," he did far outlive the vast majority of movie stars and entertainers of his era. He must have had great DNA and tried to take care of his health. I hope he also got his passport to heaven stamped before his departure date...Luke 9:23. It would be extremely sad to have lived so long as a good man, achieved so much fame and fortune and done so much high quality work only to end up at last in the wrong ultimate destination. Eternity is obviously vastly more important than our time here on earth, as Karl would tell you now if he could; however, our eternal destination is dependant upon our choice of supreme value in the here and now. If possible, perhaps Karl can get with Farrah, Roy Rogers, Dale Evans and a host of others with valid passports for endless wonderful times together. I will also join them there someday to be sure, though I hope to delay that trip by about 50 more years. There is still much to be done here of great value.
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Another great one... gone but not forgotten.
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and of course we don't hear about him because everyone is obsessed with Michael Jackson
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Wow he was a tv icon he was great in any role he was in.
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Karl Malden had a wonderful life. He had a long, successful career in an industry that is full of flash in the pans. Karl won an Oscar and an Emmy, while being recognized for years for being the pitchman for American Express. More importantly, Karl Malden was happily married for 70 years, with children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. Life does not get much better than that.
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What the...?!?!? OMG R.I.P dude



XO XO



:(:(:(:(:(:(
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Oh so sad. RIP!
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R.I.P. What an amazing life. He is definatly a role model I would like to follow.
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