Spartacus Series Finale Review: Sic Transit Gloria Mundi

Spartacus: War of the Damned Episode 10: "Victory"

When history tells us the protagonists of our story are doomed, will the adaptation accept or elide that reality? Steven DeKnight and the Spartacus creative team addressed the central question of their series finale—albeit obliquely—right in the title. No matter the outcome of the war, or the fates of individual warriors, “Victory” promised a decisive end.

Defining victory, though, left plenty of room for interpretation. The show’s “live free or die” ethos has long made it clear that death is not synonymous with losing, nor is mere survival an automatic win. By his own measure, the protagonist of this story did succeed. Because of the struggle he inspired, everyone who died on that battlefield, every refugee intercepted by Pompey, every lucky soul who traversed the mountain pass, was able to die a free man or woman.

“Victory” worked well not only as a rewarding finale to a remarkably rich series, but also as a cohesive episode of television. I wouldn’t go so far as to call it a self-contained episode, but for the coda of an entirely serialized show, it stands well on its own as one story, rather than merely a piece of a story.

This is mainly due to the way the plot essentially mirrored our titular hero’s series-long character arc, with all its visual and expository callbacks to the pilot effectively condensing the backstory and underlining how vital it still remains, so many months and years of ceaseless struggle later. Yet it also made clear how both the character and the show took that inciting injustice and drew a purpose from it that was larger than revenge. In the last in a long line of stirring speeches, Spartacus inspired his people not with talk of blood vendettas or personal glory, but of freedom, an ideal both grand and simple.

It was summed up just as well in his long-awaited tête-à-tête with his Roman opposite number, a dialogue that skirted perilously close to “we’re not so different, you and I” territory, but kept from teetering all the way in thanks to Spartacus’s visceral rejection of the parallel. Crassus has always understood his opponent’s mind strategically, but he’s never been able to fully grasp the man ideologically. The one principle they agree on—”There is no justice. Not in this world”—is the one that makes the freedom the rebels are fighting to preserve so invaluable. If there is no justice, nor security, nor guarantee or even hope of success, then nothing is more precious than for a person to retain as much control as possible over his or her own life.


The consequence of the leaders’ clash isn’t so clear-cut, though. Within the context of this narrative, Spartacus was triumphant in death, while Crassus was in many ways a beaten man. He’d hoped to end the Bringer of Rain by his own hand, an honor deprived him by a rescue detachment he was visibly pained to see arrive. His grand designs on the power and glory of saving the Republic were usurped in the blink of an eye by Pompey; he pragmatically hitched his star to the grandstanding general and alluded to the Triumvirate they and Caesar will soon form, but he’ll stand as the least-remembered of that trio.

In the process, he sacrificed his closest loved ones—first emotionally and then corporeally—on the altar of an iron code. The matter-of-fact reveal of Kore withering on the cross was the biggest gut-punch of the episode for me, and Crassus’s ironic rationalization of her punishment was salt in the wound, if I may mix my injury metaphors. No wonder he came right out and declared that he’s focused on the future because his past and present have been abysmally tainted.

On the battlefield, most of the main rebels met the gods in worthy, if grisly, fashion, usually managing to take out a couple more enemies even after suffering mortal wounds. Naevia’s was the grimmest, drawn out after being hobbled in a way that recalled her climactic duel with Ashur last season. She was in conspicuous isolation when she expired, the absence of Crixus looming large.

Lugo’s last moments definitely earned a gold star in badassery, deep-sixing a couple of soldiers while burning to death so badly that he made Harvey Dent look like a Neutrogena model. You died as you lived, Lugo: pulverizing dudes with a big honkin’ hammer while cursing in a proto-Germanic tongue.

Saxa’s demise, on the other hand, felt more rushed, though oddly fitting; it was one last reminder that her character, and her relationship with Gannicus, were too thinly developed. She had a couple of fine moments this season, but returning to her ex-lover’s arms only in death would’ve had a greater impact if the show hadn't shrugged her off in favor of the Gannicus-Sybil romance for much of the year. I’ll miss her—I just wish I’d miss her more.

As for Gannicus himself, it makes perfect sense that he would find a reason to exult in even the most excruciating end. His death wish finished its evolution from one rooted in guilt to one with nobler purpose. His satisfaction could’ve found no better expression than the vision of Oenomaus’s approving look (and kudos on bringing back Peter Mensah, even if only as a momentary silent delusion), followed by the cheers which have rung in his ears so many times returning to commemorate a truly worthy achievement.


I don’t mean to dwell on mortality in this review. One of the best decisions the writers made was to allow Agron and Nasir to walk off into the sunset together, at least one couple surviving intact. Contentment can be as dramatically fulfilling as tragedy, even if it means Agron will have to grudgingly figure out how to live as a shepherd now. (There’s your spinoff!)

Plus, as expected, “Victory,” boasted plenty of fantastic set pieces. The opening montage brought the heat immediately, at last unleashing the famous battle cry we’ve been waiting to hear from each of our heroes. The main combat was chock full of ingenious trickeration, with its booby traps and cavalry sneak attacks and siege engine fusillades aimed straight at the camera, mowing down soldiers in the extreme foreground. The visuals were characteristically lush and gorgeous; the show’s distinctive neoclassical-infused aesthetic isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, but for my money has always been one of its unique driving strengths. Several shots in “Victory” will stand among the finest the show’s ever done.

But TV shows have “lifespans” in a way that more contained stories, like films, or ongoing narratives designed to never end, like superhero comics, don’t. And a series finale is tantamount to a show’s death (the odd Kickstarted movie extension aside). Few shows, like few people, are afforded the privilege of going out on their own terms.

I realize this may be a grim way of looking at things, but think about it. From here on out, we’ll spend as much time in the company of Agron and Nasir and Laeta as we will with Naevia, Crixus, or Spartacus. Whether or not a character draws their last breath in a finale, when the series ends, so do they. It’s lovely to imagine Eric Taylor coaching one high school football team after another in perpetuity, or Lindsay Weir chasing the Dead until the heavens fall, but the fact remains. We all come to an endpoint. What matters is what we did along the way.

Whether or not an afterlife awaited Spartacus, to reunite him with his wife and restore his original identity, his certainty of this future belied a well-earned earthly contentment. Though only half the refugees made it to whatever fate lay beyond the Alps, they constituted thousands more lives than would've had the chance without Spartacus and his rebellion. The dire fates of some can spare others, like Laeta and Sybil, from worse.

This is as near to a happy ending as anyone could reasonably expect from a series whose various subtitles have included the words “blood,” “vengeance,” and “damned.” Even a bleak, fatalistic show can find a break in the clouds. And its hero can be laid to rest beneath a cairn paying proper homage, adorned with the red serpent shield. It may've been crafted for Agron, but its herald belonged strictly to the Thracian whose true name we’ll never know—a weapon forged of devotion to restore power to a man violently stripped of it, an instrument of death, an instrument of protection, capable of great and unfortunate things.


NOTAE ALIAE

Spartacus’s signature end-credits tapestry offered the perfect vehicle for a clip show/roll call of pretty much every character who's played a part in every incarnation of the series. I have no doubt that lump set upon many a throat when Andy Whitfield sprang forth as the only apropos final image. 

– It’s impossible to overstate the perfection of the “are you shitting me?” look Gannicus threw when Spartacus handed over his sword to go pow-wow with Crassus. 

– “I hold faith in a man like no other.” 

– “It is heavy burden, to gaze at war’s end and weigh bitter cost of it.” 

– “What would you have me do?” “The impossible.” 

– Ever since Gannicus and Caesar’s tryout/sparring during the latter’s spying days, we knew the rematch of the seconds-in-command was coming. (“I have longed to meet you in true contest.” “I have longed to see your head parted from fucking neck.”) Yet not for nothing did it require an entire armored phalanx to actually bring the Celt down.

– “Would that you had been born a Roman and stood beside me.” “I bless the fates that it was not so.”

– “Give me a sword.” 

– Agron’s eulogy: “One day Rome shall fade and crumble. Yet you shall always be remembered in the hearts of those that yearn for freedom.” 

– Shut up, I’m not crying. You’re crying. 

Body Count: Aw, guys. I don’t even know. 76? 760? Eleventy thousand? By any measure, it puts us well north of 500 for the season. According to my unofficial calculations, that makes this the second-deadliest final season in TV history, surpassed only by the infamous climax of Small Wonder


What did you think of the finale? Gratitude to all for reading, and for honored comments left upon forum.

Comments (252)
Submit
Sort: Latest | Popular
Great Review! I know i am late to the game but i just got around to finishing the series and i must say I was somewhat upset about the outcome but new it was going to have to end in a similar fashion. This review worked wonders in cooling me off. I have been pleasantly surprised by the writing and direction of the entire series.
Reply
Flag
Staff
Fantastic finale. The entire series as a whole was so well done. This final chapter ties for second best. Blood and Sand will always be #1. (RIP Andy).

Thanks to @adaglas for reviewing each episode so eloquently. Reading was just as much of a joy as watching it.

A lot of great things about the series but the ones that stand out are:
dialog
fight choreography
character development and chemistry
Reply
Flag
Well written, thanks for this.

Spartacus was a show I really liked and defended, despite not-too-great CGI and too much blood, or unnecessary sex scenes and "Jupiter's c***s" flying around. And yes, the show had it's down moments but even so managed to convey a great story through lovable and badass characters I cried for during this final episode. Especially for our protagonist and the wife he yearned to embrace again. Tribute to Andy Whitfield was heartwarming.

It was a nice ride and the final lesson sent will not be lost upon us, I hope. Thanks to the whole crew who stood behind the show and all the noble actors that gave life to these unforgettable characters.
3
Reply
Flag
I've finally decided to watch all of the seasons of Spartacus for the 1st time and I am so glad I did. I cried for all of the characters who died especially Spartacus yet felt happy that he'd found some kind of peace after all the fighting he did. Gotta love how everyone who died went down fighting like the badass' they were. This show was truly and amazing series and kudos to Liam for taking over the role for Andy as that must've been really hard to do considering how amazing Andy was in the role, I'm sure Andy would be proud of the way Liam took on his character as well as how the series ended. I felt really emotional when they showed Andy yelling I am Spartacus coz it brought back memories. I was so happy Agron lived in the end, he was one of my favourites, mainly coz he survived being crucified. Crassus was a great final enemy and may have survived but he still didn't really win. The montage at the end brought up so many memories and emotions for me.
2
Reply
Flag
S1E1: Veni, demonstro, vici. ;)

Even as most remarks / reviews about the show were really abysmal for it´s first two episodes of season 1 here on this site, I knew this show was about to step up and deliver us something we haven´t seen before on TV. Something great. Something compelling and hopefully something very devious. The show aimed true, never missed it´s mark, and delivered that which was never seen before. I had high hopes for the storytelling and devious plots, and alas they were delivered masterfully. I thank the whole crew of Spartacus for the great time I had watching, no, experiencing your work, or better, art. Praise and R.I.P. to Andy W. for delivering such a performance in S1, your legacy is a new high-level of TV Entertainment. Many a Thanks to Dustin Clare for stepping up to give Andy W. and the show a chance to recover. And cudos to Lyam McIntyre for his brawn to perfectly fill out the really great footprints Andy W. left in his wade through the bloodied sands. To the others in the show, without your remarkable performance those great stories could simply not have been told. I will miss this show.
More+
4
Reply
Flag
I postponed watching the series finale for as long as I could, 'cos I felt a bit sad everytime I thought it would be over forever, especially because I knew "all our friends" were going to die. I finally got myself to watch it yesterday; I thought it was a satisfying end to an excellent series, and to my surprise, it was more cheerful and hopeful than I'd thought it would be. There was a lot of death, as expected, of which many were our favorite characters, still, even Spartacus' death seemed peaceful and acceptable.I loved his final fight with Crassus, once again, The Rain Bringer, refused to simply die. Cheers to the writers, who managed to find a way to be (mostly) faithful to history and provide fans with some closure. I wish many other shows out there could learn a lesson or two from Spartacus' cohesive and meaningful writing. Great job, you guys!
8
Reply
Flag
Really? you end with a small wonder joke? Weak, bordering on disrespectful
Reply
Flag
Spartacus was with out a doubt the BEST TV series EVER! From the very first episode, I was hooked. Andy W. was a great choice for Spartacus. When "Gods of the Arena" came out to give Andy time to "recover", what a Huge disappointment and Unbelievable Shock when he died!! I truly felt the series would not recover. It took me about 3 episodes to start appreciating McEntyre, but when he fell into place as Spartacus (in my mind) he was a Perfect replacement! His snarl and gritting teeth will forever be etched in my mind. He had Big shoes to fill, and pulled it off with great style. Gannicus, Crixus and Agron were all GREAT! (enough said about them!!) Crassus and Ceasar fit their characters to a T!! The actors ALL did a Great job filling their part. I agree with others about the "new" Naevia. Did not like the "Bitch" she became. I was glad to see her meet her end!! I found myself screaming, yelling, hollering, laughing, and crying through out every episode. Just what a Great show is suppose to make you do. Thanks for Every episode! Time to drop cable!
3
Reply
Flag
Excellent episode. And I cried like a baby, ain't even gonna try to deny it.
10
Reply
Flag
Andy D: any chance we can get you on Game of Thrones? Purr-ty pah-leese? Cause dude...whoa! the reviews on that show don't even begin to address it. lol! ;)
2
Reply
Flag
Epic end to an amazing journey. Gratitude to all involved!
2
Reply
Flag
Unless I am mistaken, no statue or memorial of Spartacus exists, except of course for the permanence of history and the films and books his story inspired. Your review was spot on. At first I was turned off by the liquid lood, not due to an aversion of of blood and gore, but for how fake and gratuitous it seemed...then I got used to it, or it seemed to subside. The series finale seemed to lack those translucent waves of red, favoring a more traditional film-like depiction of carnage. I grew to respect and accept Liam in the role, never quite accepted the new Naevia, though the original actress didn't have the physicality required to be the tough-bitch warrior that No. 2 Naevia was in the end. I never bought her and Crixus together and it is a shame she wasn't comforted by his smiling face - but you can't do that with every death scene. This wasn't Six Feet Under after all! The final end credit was a touch of class and appropriate homage to Andy. I now find myself removing articles from my speech, and replacing "I'm sorry" with "apologies" "gratitude" in place of "thank you" and "absent" for "without." I've even caught myself doing it in emails. I suspect I am not alone in this. Great review and well-written!
More+
8
Reply
Flag
Love the breaking of the Hollywood standard of always killing off the gay characters. This ending with not just one..but two gay characters living.. And possibly going off to be free and happy. Steven DeKnight said of breaking this rule..."FUCK THE RULES"... He is amazing.
7
Reply
Flag
I know it's been a few years since your comment and I am late to the game but I too deeply appreciated that this show did not adhere to the rule of not just Hollywood but 95 Percent, maybe more, of TV shows and movies all around the world made that have a gay couple in them ending with either the couple breaking up, or one or both of them dying. Nasir and Agron will go down in history as the most badass gay couple ever in a TV show or movie, and they had a happy ending!
Reply
Flag
thanks for a great read! gonna miss spartacus and your reviews!
4
Reply
Flag
Andy was great! But not enough credit is Given to Liam Mcentyre. Those were enourmous shoes to fill and the show never missed a beat. When Naevia was replaced I stopped liking that character. Couldn't even stand her on camera. Never the case with Spartacus. This show will be truly missed. I'll do my part by having all my friends get caught up to this and making the show as LEGENDARY as the man himself.
8
Reply
Flag
I also did not like Naevia after the first season, but I think it was more due to the evolution the character took and not due to the actress who played her (who I think made a pretty decent job). In general, I think that turning her into a warrior made her less interesting as a character.
1
Reply
Flag
RIP Spartacus best series ever
5
Reply
Flag
A great series. Will they do the whole Caesar and the First Triumvirate thing?
Hope so.
1
Reply
Flag
A satisfying end to a great show.
I'm happy :)
2
Reply
Flag
That was a good last episode.
I was a bit surprised how sad I felt about most of them all dying.
4
Reply
Flag
Gannicus will come back... After he get's off the cross
14
Reply
Flag
All i can say is, that it was a worthy end of a fantastic show. Every episode i have watched with amazement. There was not one episode that was bad....Sad to see a lot of the loved characters die :(.....still fantastic job who has worked on this project!!!
5
Reply
Flag
One of the best tv programmes ever - glad they stuck to history and didn't go with the Hollywood ending although it was heartbreaking to see nearly everyone die and credit to the producers for having Andy the final line in the credit
7
Reply
Flag
Agron and Nasir's spin-off:
An interracial gay couple raising sheep in B.C. Italy?
Desperate Sheepherders? Scandalous!
13
Reply
Flag
I really wouldn't say someone like Crassus ever loses, because he maintains his strength of mind and moves ahead. Crassus and Spartacus together really would've been awesome. Harsh pragmatic decisions aside, Crassus always showed respect and acknowledged people's worth no matter their title.

(Well, he can't have been a complete villain if they wanted a Ceasar spin-off. We're supposed to like and care about these guys' victories later)
1
Reply
Flag
WOW! What a way to end a show. Especially the very last scene wit Andy Whitfield screaming "I AM SPARTACUS!" gave me goosebumps.
19
Reply
Flag
Gratitude, producers. For an epic series finale that did justice to the series, the fans, and the myth. For a completely gripping, yet satisfying conclusion. The battle scenes showed the magnitude of the Roman army, yet they were filmed in a way that was easy to follow and intercut with individual vignettes that added emotional heft. The photography was stunning; in some instances, the scenes were as beautiful as if they were oil paintings. I loved how there were multiple references to the beginning of the series (the ribbon; the red serpent on the shield; the rain) so that the story came full circle. I loved that my favorite couple survived, and the show ended on a hopeful note. The music was well chosen and gave further emotional power to the story, especially the almost liturgical music at the end which felt almost reverent. And the pictures over the closing credits, acknowledging the entire cast throughout the entire series, and then ending with Andy Whitfield shouting that he is Spartacus, was perfection. It's been several days, and I am still feeling deeply moved.
12
Reply
Flag
THANK you Andy Daglas for all the awesome reviews and getting Spartacus on the FTW list. Any idea or what show(s) you will be reviewing next?
Any concerns I addressed in the FTW list didn't apply to you:-)
1
Reply
Flag
Staff
Hah thanks as always. I'm finishing out the last 5 weeks of Vampire Diaries, but you never know what the future holds.
1
Reply
Flag
Orphan Black, Southland, Legit, Breaking Bad, and some many more great shows. I watch TVD but I wouldn't put it in the same category as Justified, POI, Banshee, Spartacus, Breaking Bad, Orphan Black (bbc), or for comedy Legit or Archer.
However the vampire diaries has Ian Somerhalder--pure eye candy! I use to enjoy the show much more but something has changed--I still "love" it but not like I use to.
Reply
Flag
Steven de Knight and the other cast and crew thank you for the sacrifices you guys made to make this amazing series!

I eagerly await your future projects and regret only that it will take time for the new projects to arrive.
4
Reply
Flag
Spartacus: the man died and a legend was born.
Same for the show ?
5
Reply
Flag
Knowing that Spartacus and pals would be killed in the end kind of left me dreading going into the final episode ever since the end of the first season. Mostly on the subconscious level, but as it got closer to the end, it became much more conscious, even though I looked forward to each upcoming episode.
So, I was really impressed with how the final episode delivered what I thought would be a much more painful emotional blow. It came across to me… like a “victory” (perfectly titled). The finale captured the essence of death not being the worst of consequences; better the any anything else I’ve seen in a show or movie. Symbolizing, that living un-free is a much worse consequence then death. Essentially “live free or die” free.
I liked how Spartacus had a strong intuition especially going back to episode 8 and even more so in the finale. He knew he was going to die and he was at peace with that along with some of the other heroins. It made the audience feel alright with it as well.
Which brings me to Naevia’s death. Some people didn’t like the way she went out, but I strongly agree that it was a smart decision for her not to have an epiphany, a sense of peace, or a Crixus flash before she died. It would begin to play out really cheesy if all of the main characters had these epiphanies before their death and saving that for Spartacus and Gannicus is the ideal direction. Also, it leaves the door open for various perspectives on what follows death, since she fell into blackness without feeling a sense of peace. And if you’re going to demonstrate that perspective you may as well do it with the least popular heroin, which she unanimously was. Not necessarily routing against her, just least favorite.
My least favorite vibe from the episode was Pompeii killing off most of the rebels in the mountains. I believe it was necessary though. It allowed Pompeii to gain the victory rather than Crassus, which added an interesting element. I was surprised how accepting Crassus was. It reminded me of in the beginning of the season when Tiberious was freaking out (this time Ceasar) and Crassus already had a future play in motion.
“Ceasar – you forever speak of the future. Crassus – the past cannot be altered. The present holds, but regret and loss. (looks up to Kore on the cross) It’s only in the days to come that a man may find solace, when memory fades.”
Love it…one of many brilliant quotes in this episode. I wonder what Crassus’s plan in motion is or will be?
I loved the symbolism with the red serpent on the shield and it would take a page to break that down.

A masterpiece!!!! Loved the finale and the whole series (especially the first season)!
Also, a brilliant decision to have Andy Whitfield yell the last words “I AM SPARTACUS!” I love how genuine it feels when Andy says that, it’s hard to explain! I would have loved to have seen that moment when recording and see what caused Andy to capture that moment the way he did.
More+
9
Reply
Flag
Great final episode. Lots of epic moments. If not for history Spar would have finished off Crassus. Was especially sad seeing Korre have a bad end, she was just unlucky all along. Has been a fantastic series of blood, guts, fighting, backstabbing, boobs and 'inspired by' history.
4
Reply
Flag
well, i dunno about y'all but i wept like a wee child. that is all.
13
Reply
Flag
And I have to add, final chance after I've forgotten to do so every episode: the music in Spartacus is just epic.
5
Reply
Flag
I ugly-cried my way all through the second half, not caring that I wasn't alone in the room. I loved this episode. I can't believe it's over, but at least it has been good from beginning, through middle to end, and it was so well written and performed, I loved its send-off.
19
Reply
Flag
This will stand as one of the truest Shakespearean tv series ever.Its language was pure, its nudity was never pornographic, and its violence was that of a Sam Peckinpah unleashed as the curse of its time. No one doubt that this is a masterpiece that as The Sopranos will be the subject of discussion, academic glorification and the thesis subject of many a pseudo-intellectual student out to prove to his/her parents that all that money they slaved to give him/her an education did not go wasted on something like a thesis on the adultery of dolphins in the North Pole.
Yes, it is the End, and we can here on the background the vague lyrics of Jim Morrison swoon and the glory of the howling winds of that Bob Dylan tune that should always accompany the finality of the human condition in cinema and great tv series.We shed tears to wash the blood of the innocents, then we prepare to go party and pop them pills that are not yet illegal to the sound of trance music as the ultimate use of our freedom.Hip Hip Hooray!!!!!!!!
3
Reply
Flag
Spartacus was a great show and it's conclusion was so satisfying that I believe it to be one of the best TV show finales ever.

Starz, please get on with that Ceasar-Spin Off that has been rumored.
11
Reply
Flag
I also liked that no one really knows what happened to Spartacus, and they addressed that with the Romans.
3
Reply
Flag
hate to see it go, but I'm glad it ended and didn't drag on for a few more years and get stupid.. so long blood and breasts (that's what season 1 should've been subtitled instead of Blood and Sand :P). it pretty much ended how I thought it would though but I wish Spartacus had killed that Crassus and had lived, since from what I understood, he just disappeared and was never killed or found dead but I could be wrong. I also wish Gannicus would've survived, but I know the real one died so I guess that couldn't have happened but man, those Romans sure do like to crucify... also as soon as I saw Naevia fight Ceasar I knew she'd die because, well, he's Ceasar! so he obviously wouldn't have been killed.
2
Reply
Flag
It was a fantastic, yet bittersweet ending to a wonderful show. From the beginning we knew what the final outcome of the series was going to be, but that didn't make it any easier to accept. I appreciate the way the show handled the ending of the characters. I felt they rang true to who they were, and although it was hard to see it was the fate that awaited them all.

I absolutely LOVED the conversation between Spartacus and Crassus prior to the battle, and I LOVED their final battle especially the look on Crassus' face when he thought Spartacus was about to get him and then when he realized he was saved by his men. Spartacus went out the way that he wanted free, and he was finally going to be back exactly where he wanted to be, in the arms of his loving wife. That's all he has ever wanted and in the end that is what he got. As he told Gannicus earlier in the episode, he may have found comfort in the arms of other women, but no one has ever been able to remove the void that has filled his heart since Sura was taken from him.

When the first arrow went through Spartacus my heart leaped out my chest. I knew it was coming as soon as he got the jump on Crassus but it didn't make it any easier. I'm glad Argon and Nasir got to him and he was able to die among some of the slaves he led to freedom. Fantastic ending to a fantastic show. I will truly miss it.

Gannicus' WTF face when Spartacus handed over his sword was hilarious! His face was like "You can't be serious!"

The montage of all of the characters on Spartacus through the seasons was great, and it was absolutely fitting that they end this show with the image of Andy Whitfield yelling "I am Spartacus!" Perfect ending to one of the best shows on television in recent years.

Andy Daglas thank you for writing insightful reviews every week!
More+
11
Reply
Flag
Staff
Thanks, glad you enjoyed them.
Reply
Flag
Best show ever.
4
Reply
Flag
Salute to a fabulous ending.........
But no current romans dead, pinches a alot.....
Reply
Flag
Fitting finale to one of the best shows on tv
2
Reply
Flag
Sadly as a viewer I feel robbed of justice. Not to say that as a criticism of the show but watching all these characters die while no Roman of worth has balanced the scales is an irritating itch that wont leave me. None of the three current opposers (Caesar,Crassus or Pompei) die which has been inconsistent with the rebels encounters to date.

I must have seen hundreds of spears fly at Spartacus. Why the Roman army didn't call out those three marksmen earlier is beyond me. They could've ended the war in season 1. 3 for 3. Now I'm left with the fact that Spartacus and Crixus were taking down in the most cowardly way possible. Stabbed in the back with a spear/spears.

RIP Andy
5
Reply
Flag
had caesar nor crassus nor pompey died, Roman Republic won't crumble into pieces. upon forming the First Triumvirate, it lead to the death of the Republic and birth of the Roman Empire, and eventually the collapse of slavery. Spartacus cause has never been lost.
5
Reply
Flag
Well having Spartacus, Crixus and Gannicus defeated in a cowardly way was the only way to have them defeated without putting the skills of any roman above them. So this is actually a good thing.

The rest is simply history. You cannot make a show about history and divert from established major facts. Caesar, Crassus and Pompey go on to become major players in the history of Rome and in turn influence the entire history of the western civilizations - and as a result in the long run even that of the United States. So how could they have possibly killed of any of these important romans?

Great finale to a great show though. I do hope they make a spin off and let us see more of this roman world. A Caesar spin off would rock.
5
Reply
Flag
Yeah, it was a little infuriating. But the point of that was to show that Romans are cowards. The only way for them to take down the mighty Spartacus and Crixus is by stabbing them in the back. Even Caesar stood behind shields and just watched when Gannicus was cut with swords, and only when Gannicus was on his knees, Caesar stepped forward to punch him.
4
Reply
Flag
Yeah I was surprised by that though. When on the battlefield Caesar actively pursued Crixus and Agron only to hide against Gannicus. If i ever see someone wearing fancy dress as a Roman soldier I swear to avenge my fallin brethren. Haha
4
Reply
Flag
Lugo going out on fire and still wielding his massive hammer was just awesome. I loved that big Ger'maniac.
8
Reply
Flag
There was an inconsistency in the first part of the Finale Ceasar said that there were six attacks in half as many days but the clip showed only 5 attack parties shown: Gannicus, Lugo, Nasir (made me laugh) nameless guy with head on the sword, and Spartacus. I don’t know about you guys but I think it would have been awesome if we see one of the ladies scream “I AM SPARTACUS!”

Think about Saxa killing a Roman soldier and with her knives aloft screaming “I AM SPARTACUS!”
1
Reply
Flag
While many might not know his face,they at least knew Spartacus is male,so any woman for that matter,saying "I am Spartacus",wouldn't make sense. From what I got,was all men saying "I am Spartacus",it was done,so Romans would think Spartacus is everywhere and I think,those events were done at same time-ish.
1
Reply
Flag
During the battle sequence I began thinking if I've ever seen a bigger and/or longer action scene in a TV episode. I still haven't come up with an answer. There was a shitload of action in this episode. All and all, this was a great show from beginning to the end, and I'm happy they had the sense to leave it at four full-quality seasons instead of pushing out more seasons without meaning.

The ending was also as pretty perfect. Considering that everyone cannot be pleased, this was a formidable ending to a superb show. Over at Entertainment Weekly, showrunner Steven S. DeKnight explains why the ending was written the way it was, and I agree with his views. One could always come up with different ideas, but this ending was good as it was. I, for example, was expecting Laeta and Sibyl to become pregnant by Spartacus and Gannicus so that the men would have lived on in their children, despite that the Romans tried to kill them. But maybe that would have been too sappy.
7
Reply
Flag
that was my one teensy weensy disappointing moment, that neither of those women ended up pregnant. But maybe that would have been too close to the end of the Kirk Douglas version.
1
Reply
Flag
would have loved to see Caesar’s head cut off...but he had his own demise by being f*@%&d by a 'BOY'...will live with him forever...
2
Reply
Flag
What a disgrace to the mighty Caesar. But he got his revenge as the boy's death was partly his doing... or rather not doing anything. Caesar would be great for a spin off.

If his head would have been cut off it would have blown the whole show apart as it is about historic events. Some minor changes for the most part in the grey areas of things unknown today are okay (e.g. Caesar probably never met Spartacus although he did serve under Crassus after the war) but killing someone as important to history like Caesar would have been a big no-no. Kudos to thre writers for sticking relatively close to what is known about Spartacus.
4
Reply
Flag
I'll be honest... I hated the Navea character. I wanted her to die a while ago, so her time came up, I was like YAY! Everything else was icing on the cake. The absolute end with the original actor was a nice touch/reminder. Great show, hope something comes along which will fill that void.
6
Reply
Flag
The funny thing about the Naevia character is that I really loved her in season one, and whilst I agree - I totally hated her by the end, you gotta respect the severe arc that her character took - from innocent young virgin to Naevia warrior princess? Much as I dested her at the end I still rank her slightly above Sybil....
at least she fought back (however misguided).
1
Reply
Flag
This was beyond perfect. I remember how my best friend and I started this show, thinking it would be a typical Starz series, lots of sex and violence. And there is indeed lots of that, but it's not what made this show so good. there was also a compelling story, rather consistent storytelling and amazing characters. Kudos to the actors and the writers for bringing them alive and to a satisfying end.
I'm really sad to see this show go but I love how perfect it ended. And really, anyone who didn't cry or at least feel a lump in his/her throat at Agron's last words to Spartacus must be heartless.:)
12
Reply
Flag
epic and worthy
3
Reply
Flag
Load More Comments

Like TV.com on Facebook