The CW Is Stuck in a Superhero Rut

The CW is stuck in a rut. Specifically, The CW is stuck in a superhero rut.

The young-skewing network picked up its fifth superhero series last week -- the Cress Williams vehicle Black Lightning -- but with just 15 series in its 2017-18 lineup, and only 10 hours of primetime programming available a week, five superhero series is a sizable one-third of the network's upcoming schedule. Although Black Lightning -- which is not part of the so-called Arrowverse at this time -- won't debut until midseason, the writing is plainly on the wall: The CW is in the superhero business and everything else comes second. And that's a problem, because the network is sacrificing prestige programming and different voices for an aging genre with diminishing returns.

See The CW's 2017-2018 fall schedule

During a conference call Thursday morning, CW president Mark Pedowitz told reporters there would never be more than four superhero programs airing at any one time -- currently, Supergirl, The Flash, DC's Legends of Tomorrow and Arrow will all return in the fall -- but he also confirmed that the network has no intentions of stopping the DC Comics train anytime soon.

"This programming will last as long as people want to watch it," Pedowitz said. "As long as we have quality programming, which we have thanks to [Arrowverse super-producer] Greg Berlanti and [Black Lightning creators] Salim and Mara Brock Akil ... it will last as long as people want to watch it. ... It will keep going. Quality matters in this case."

It's worth noting that DC is part of Warner Bros., which owns half of The CW (along with CBS), but this is also the same argument Pedowitz has been peddling for years regarding the longevity of Supernatural, which will wrap up its twelfth season Thursday evening and be back for lucky number 13 in the fall. And that's all well and good -- people are still tuning in so of course it makes sense to renew these programs -- but the insistence that quality matters falls a bit flat. Arrow and The Flash have both seen major dips over the years, with the latter's being tied to its change in tone: from a light and funny series to one that more closely resembles the often unrelenting gloom of Arrow.

Watch the trailers for The CW's new shows


Complicating matters further is the fact the network is moving the Golden Globe-winning and critically acclaimed comedy Jane the Virgin from Monday's prime post-Supergirl slot to Fridays at 9/8c after the Golden Globe-winning and equally critically acclaimed comedy Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, which made the move to Fridays last season. In doing so, The CW is sending the message that, while it wants to remain in the prestige TV business, it's also no longer a priority.

It's true that the two hourlong, female-driven comedies are best paired together -- they previously aired together on Mondays in 2015 -- and it's equally true they're not ratings juggernauts, with Jane averaging a 0.35 rating among adults ages 18-49 in its third season and Crazy Ex-Girlfriend's second season coming in dead last for the network and all of television, with just a 0.2 rating. But they are the two programs that brought prestige television to The CW and remain the only two series in network history to garner significant awards attention. Additionally, Jane is one of two series on the network to actually see an increase in total viewers this season (the other being The Vampire Diaries spin-off The Originals).

When the network issued early renewals to both series in January, Pedowitz defended the decision to reporters at the Television Critics Association winter press tour saying, "When you have great critical work and a critically acclaimed and [award-]nominated show like [Crazy Ex-Girlfriend], it deserves to be picked up. It has nothing to do with numbers. It has everything to do with [how] Crazy Ex, Jane the Virgin and the DC franchises have helped alter the perception of what The CW has become."

Black Lightning is not part of The CW's Arrowverse

But now both Jane the Virgin and Crazy Ex-Girlfriend have been punted to Fridays, which has traditionally been considered the death knell for a series. Although that's not necessarily the case any longer -- especially on The CW, where digital viewing is weighted more heavily than on any other broadcast network -- there's only one program in CW history to have escaped Fridays, and that's Supernatural, which is The CW's top-rated non-superhero series and will probably never die until stars Jensen Ackles and Jared Padalecki decide to get out of the family business. Short version: it's the exception.


But viewer interest in superheroes is dwindling on The CW -- or at the very least, interest in these particular superheroes is dwindling. Each of the network's four current superhero shows, while the top four performing programs, have seen a decline in ratings this season. This fits the pattern across all of TV -- nearly every show sees its ratings diminish as it ages -- but Arrow, The Flash and Legends of Tomorrow have all dipped at least 20 percent year over year, and that's significant (Supergirl is a special case as it moved from CBS to the lesser-watched CW in its second season, though it likely would have followed suit). So despite the fact the shows remain relatively popular with CW viewers, does it still make sense, from a creative standpoint, to go all-in on a genre that is experiencing viewer fatigue and has yet to offer something truly new?

On one hand, yes, it does make sense; superheroes helped to change the face of The CW in the fall of 2012, when the Greg Berlanti-produced Arrow made its debut. The success of Marvel's The Avengers in May of 2012 had proven the masses cared about live-action superheroes on film, but that didn't mean viewership would translate to the small screen. By introducing Arrow into its then female-centric programming slate -- which included shows like 90210, Hart of Dixie, Gossip Girl and The Carrie Diaries -- The CW took a big risk, one that many other networks may have avoided all together.

Five years on Arrow has changed both the trajectory and the reputation of The CW. Oliver Queen's story brought male viewers to a network that historically created content primarily aimed at young women. It produced two direct spin-offs and features an extended universe that also includes Supergirl. And all four series remain at the top of The CW's most-watched programs list.

Supernatural will do an animated Scooby-Doo episode next season

But on the other hand, as we all know, popularity doesn't necessarily always equal quality. So as The CW prepares to launch its fifth Berlanti-produced superhero series -- which at least stands out a bit because it's about a black superhero who's reentering the game after several years, as opposed to yet another superhero origin story -- it's worth discussing whether compromising on more prestige programming by leaning into the superhero genre is ultimately worth it.

Since Arrow debuted -- just one year after Pedowitz took over at the network -- The CW has taken a few risks that most other networks have not. In addition to Jane the Virgin and Crazy Ex-Girlfriend -- which, as a telenovela and a musical comedy, were even bigger swings for The CW than Arrow had been in 2012 -- the network also received positive attention for the harsh realities depicted in the first two seasons of the post-apocalyptic drama The 100. Elsewhere it breathed new life into the fatigued zombie genre with iZombie, a series that, despite being fairly beloved by critics, has been moved by the network into a midseason slot because the glut of superheroes take priority.


But The CW has also had plenty of misses, too, like last season's comedy No Tomorrow -- which the network had hoped would continue to build its hourlong female-driven comedy brand -- and Frequency, a remake of the film of the same name. The crop of new programs, which in addition to Black Lightning includes a reboot of Dynasty from the creative team behind Gossip Girl, a military-themed drama in Valor, and Life Sentence, a series about a woman who finds out she's no longer dying of cancer, obviously remain untested. On the surface they appear to offer up a wide range of tones and themes, but we won't know how they perform or affect the status of the network for months.

Twitter is not happy with Netflix for delayed Riverdale release

Because while it's true the DC series are a large reason people view The CW differently in 2017 than in 2012, and the relative success of the Arrowverse is likely what allows The CW to continue to renew shows like Crazy Ex-Girlfriend -- during Thursday's call, Pedowitz noted that last November's superhero crossover gave the network "its most-watched week in six years" -- this wave won't last forever. It might be paying the bills for now, but when it fizzles out, what will the network have to show for it?

(Full disclosure: TVGuide.com is owned by CBS, one of The CW's parent companies.)

This article originally appears on TV Guide.com.

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May 19, 2017
I don't think the CW has a "superhero show problem" so much as Berlanti-helmed shows have a "shitty writing problem" (which is most evident in the terrible romance plots all of them have). The shows are good for about a season, season and a half, before they become flaming, garbage piles.

It also doesn't help that the writers make certain characters act in ways that contradict their previous writing, because they need them to create forced drama instead of letting things naturally occur by setting smaller subplots in motion earlier in a season.

That's just my take though.
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May 19, 2017
I don't think that superheroes are the problem with the CW as much as the fact that their superhero shows are terrible.

They got the exact problem a lot of successful shows have - gotten too successful that writers have their heads up their assess and throw away half assed work expecting the audience to take it no matter what.

At least Flash writers slightly admitted a lot of their mistakes and said some things (no spoilers!) that make it seem like next season might be better.

But I don't think it's a CW issue. I mean ABC is adding Inhumans, I forgot who does New Warriors. Fox has Xmen (or whatever it's called) - everyone are trying to jump on this trend. Since the MCU doesn't seem to stop, I doubt TV will either.
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May 19, 2017
Meh, I tuned into CW this season for No Tomorrow (a fantastically charming series) and Frequency (wife loved the film, series was ok) and we were rewarded with two cancelled series. So it looks like I can write off this channel once again.
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May 19, 2017
That's a bit like saying that CBS is stuck in a procedural rut.
It's obviously working for them, but to be fair, they are looking at different shows too, unless the rebooted Blake Carrington has a secret identity.
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May 19, 2017
The viewership on superhero shows has dwindled because the writing and story lines are less compelling. Arrow has become so dower and brooding that I've pretty much stopped watching, again, this season. I still record it and will watch the season finale just to see what happens. The Flash, unfortunately, is losing its fun factor and is starting to go the way of Arrow. All I have to say is if Iris stays dead, I'm done! Bad enough DCU killed Black Canary, another fact that has soured me on Arrow, but to keep killing mains in these shows just feels counterproductive. Same with Supergirl. The fun factor is just going away there too. But at least they're trying. I mean come on, you've got a previous Superman, Supergirl, and Lois Lane as characters! That's fun! But then it's ruined with so-so plots. Wanna have some real fun? Get Tim Daly and Dana Delany to do a guest shot! (They're the voices of Superman and Lois Lane in the cartoons). Hell, throw in Nicholle Tom for some added fun (the voice of Supergirl).

Thing is, superheroes and comics were always about escape and fun. Recently superheroes have just become dower and too serious. And while it's ok for a while, it does wear on the audience (2nd season of Daredevil anyone?). I'm not saying don't be gritty, but be fun too. Ok, let's all go ask someone out for coffee!
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May 19, 2017
The proliferation of superheroes on the network is representative of the superhero genre renaissance which has been going since the Dark Knight Trilogy and the Marvel movies began. It will eventually die down a bit as has happened before. Vampire Diaries likely got its start because of the Twilight driven Vampire craze that has seemingly passed.

Cow always likes to cater to what the viewers are into at the present moment. When tastes change so will the network.
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May 19, 2017
What provides value to the current set of super heroes show at CW are the cross-overs.
Sure, on their own, the Flash, Legends of Tomorrow, Arrow and Supergirl are pretty geeky shows, comic books brought to life, but when they cross-over, it gives them more dimensions.
For those who have been reading comics for such a long time, who didn't like cross-overs? It was fun!
Look at how much we've been anticipating the Batman v Superman movie?
Look at how the Avengers worked out so awesomely?
Cross-over are cool, but they are also smart in that they do expand your viewing horizon within a 'universe' you give a crap about. For the most part.
CBS has cross-over between 4 of its shows, although not all 4 at the same time, but NCIS, Scorpion, Hawaii Five-0 and MagGyver are all shows in the same 'universe'.
I've missed a lot of NCIS and Hawaii Five 0 and well, while I love Scorpion, I missed a lot of that too! I was able to watch the full season of MacGyver and when it crossed-over with Hawaii Five-0, well, let's just say that I'm going to try and catch up on all those other shows now. But that's me. And more to the point, that's good marketing, I am now curious enough to see what I've been missing.
At CW, the great thing about our 4 super heroes shows is that they all have the same show runner, Greg Berlanti.
However, that might become a weakness now.
Creativity for so many shows under the same show runner? That is not happening, it's the same formula, different writers.
This is the biggest issue for all these shows. They now need to diversify the showrunners in order to get better stories.
The new Black Lightning show it would seem will be filmed in Atlanta and will not be part of the 'Arrow/Verse'. But it's under Greg Berlanti, so, I would expect that it will be very similar to all of the other shows in structure.
If you wonder why it's not part of the 'Arrow/Verse', well, your guess is as good as mine. I think it's really short-sighted. Sure, all other 4 shows are filmed within the same studios in the same city, unlike Black Lightning, so cross-overs would be more problematic, I get that.
But that doesn't mean Black Lightning couldn't be part of Earth X of some kind. We have Earth 1, 2, 3, 19 and 38 I think right now.
If I had been the show runner on this one, Black Lightning would be on one of these other Earth. It's kinda of a bad business decision to announce otherwise. They are trying to ensure that no expectations of cross-overs will happen, perhaps if this show doesn't stand on its own, it also doesn't want any expectations of its characters going to other shows, I don't know. Just makes very little sense.
Black Lightning could simply be on an Earth where none of our other characters need to be.
Supergirl's inclusion made sense, because the Flash found her out by accident, testing his speed and his ability to travel to other dimensions.. Sure, Vibe and Gypsy can go to any Earth, but, they would not be necessarily drawn to Black Lightning's Earth unless there was a reason ' hence the excuse for a cross-over'. For now, Gypsy is the one with the real knowledge of the multiverse.
Anyways, bottom line is that the CW's Super Heroes shows are a strength, but the rut might be in the fact that there is only one show runner in town. TIme for Berlanti to pass some torches to new show runners and let creativity and diversity truly rule for each of these shows.
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May 19, 2017
a) I don't think the Berlanti people want to introduce more than two "main" universes. Or even two, but they were kinda stuck with fitting Supergirl in somehow because it went to CBS originally instead of the CW. That and it was established that there was no Superman in the Arrowverse before Supergirl started airing.

and b) Black Lightning doesn't fit in either existing universe. Since he's a retired superhero, and both of those heroes basically had their superheroics start with Oliver and/or Kara.
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May 19, 2017
The 'super-hero' gig may have started with Arrow, but in a multi-verse of Earths, each Earth has a unique timeline and Black Lightning can fit in one of those Earths which have yet to be explored. The move from Supergirl to CW provided a great opportunity to have that character meet up with The Flash and provide a link between the heroes. Characters like Vibe and Gypsy also provide a great vehicle for trans-dimensional travel. Anyways, to each their own.
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May 19, 2017
For the record, the first Supergirl \ Flash crossover was during the first season when they were still on CBS.

Also, I'm willing to bet anything you want that there will be a crossover with something in the arrowverse. I mean that is how the original crossover happened. Supergirl's rating were abysmal so they sent Barry to save them.

Heck, part of their whole schtick is that the more crossovers occur, the more it forces people to watch all shows just to understand what's going on.
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May 20, 2017
I know.. :)
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May 19, 2017
Heck, I'd like to see a modern-day Justice Society show, Arrowverse or otherwise. They already covered the diversity issue on Legends: Look! Vixen in 1942. Dr. Mid-Nite is black instead of white!
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May 19, 2017
Oh, I'd agree that Black Lightning could be on a different Earth. I just don't think Berlanti and the CW want to toss a third "mainstream" universe into the mix.

Plus as someone else noted, there's crossover issues. The Arrowverse and Superverse (?) stuff are in Vancouver in real-life. Black Lightning is in Atlanta. You'd end up with a lot of "Hey, did you hear about BL coming out of retirement?" dialogue but not actual seeing of him because they can't fly the actors and production crew across the countries.
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May 20, 2017
If ever, somehow, there was a cross-over with Black Lightning, more than likely, it would be Gypsy that would be the catalyst, because she is the only character who might have knowledge about Black Lightning's Earth and it's dynamic. And as for how she would know about Black Lightning, well, the guy didn't retire for all that long, maybe what.. 10 yrs at most and it seems that Gypsy has been around for a while know, so, anyways, they could easily come up with a 'plausible' explanation if they really wanted to.
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May 19, 2017
1) I think it's more of an issue that just like in the crossover, the entire gang of all shows combined had to flat out say that Supergirl kicks all of their butts instantly. So they had to remove her elsewhere.

Questioning why Oliver doesn't ask Barry to solve all of his problem is dumb enough, if you add Kara it's even worse.
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May 19, 2017
1) I think that's the in-show rationale to some degree, but it still boils down to, "Supergirl started on a different network when we weren't allowed to do crossovers or suggest they were part of the same universe. Then CBS changed their minds. Then we all ended up on the same network."

I think the same basic Earth-38 explanation would have been used no matter what the power-level of the CBS hero was.

2) I don't question that Barry solves all of Oliver's problems. But when even the people in the show note that they have some big apocalypse every May, you'd think they'd block a few days out. Damien is going to blow up the world--which includes Central City--and Barry can't be bothered to help out?
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May 19, 2017
1) That might be true. I just think the power level is part of the issue here as well. I mean we had shows doing cross overs all the time in things that don't work together - like Bones and Sleepy Hollow.

Network says yes and you treat it like a special event and never think about it again. Heck, Marvel and DC had crossovers between them like Super-Man vs Spider-Man.

2) Generally speaking, one can accept Barry and Oliver not calling upon each other - except sometimes they do when they need to do it for the sake of rating which is the problem.

Like Oliver calling Barry to rescue him from the League of Shadows prison, or the original pilot episodes for Legends with Savage or Barry calling Oliver to help fight Reverse Flash who has an arrow that can stop speedsters (but not asking for help with Zoom or Savitar).

That's my problem.
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May 19, 2017
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May 19, 2017
Too many superhero series!
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May 19, 2017
I think Reign suffered because of this and was unvalued. It should of gotten another season or 2

I hope The 100 doesn't suffer because of this either.

Honestly the CW is one of the most frustratng networks because some great shows have come from it or been on it at some point, but all too often they get cut down prematurely. In part because of what another article here once mentioned, this new massproduction of large amounts of tv shows which gives us great shows but at the same time is responsible for networks cancelling shows that deserved better. The CW is definitely a network way too comfortable with it's cut and run approach even when it has a great show with great story and great cast. Let's remember they are responsible to canceling Veronica Mars and Gilmore Girls both of which obviously were amazing and had a large enough fan base to get them revived. In addition to those R.I.P Hellcats, which was amazing and had so much potential, Hidden Palms which maybe only I remember but it was good, and so many more I'm sure
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May 19, 2017
"this wave won't last forever. It might be paying the bills for now, but when it fizzles out, what will the network have to show for it?

Critics have been saying this for going on 50 years now. If/when the superhero shows fizzle, the networks will move on to something else.

When westerns fizzled, networks moved on to country-humor sitcoms. When those fizzled, networks moved on to 60s spy shows. Then superheroes (Hulk and Wonder Woman on at the same time? Madness!) Then medical dramas. Then nighttime soap operas. Then nighttime adult cartoons. Then teenage dramas. Then crime-solving procedurals.And probably a few dozen others that I skipped over.

Unless broadcast networks go out of business entirely, they're always going to find something to milk like crazy, watch it fizzle, and move on to milk something else to is last gasp. As far as CW superhero shows... this too will pass.
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May 19, 2017
You forgot that the 90s were the golden age of sitcoms :)
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May 19, 2017
I didn't forget: as noted, I skipped over. :)

But I'm not sure that the 90s were any bigger with sitcoms than any other decade. Sitcoms are always big, Now if you want to break it down to country-humor, or family or, non-comedy comedy... I was going for something a little narrower.
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May 19, 2017
No, I actually meant that literally. The 90s were actually called "the golden age of sitcoms". There were a lot more sitcoms back then then there were before or after.

Note that I'm talking straight out sitcoms. Not just comedy shows. As in multi cam & laugh tracks - mostly those taped in front of a living studio audience.

They began to have a major decrease in the late 90s early 2000s because
1) The dramedies of David E Kelly (Ally McBeal and such) who went somewhat more into the route of drama with jokes.
2) The rise of The Office, which gave birth to a huge line of not just mockumentries (Parks & Rec, Modern Family etc) but also the non-live, single cams shows.

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May 19, 2017
And evening game shows. And reality shows. We're still waiting for reality shows to fizzle, right? That'll be just after TV Guide stops covering Survivor so extensively. ;)
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May 19, 2017
The other thing to remember is that "prestige" is relative. Arrow and Flash may not be setting personal bests... but they're still better than at least 75% of what else is out there on broadcast networks.
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May 19, 2017
Isn't "prestige" (in this context) a term that specifically refers to awards recognition (Emmys, etc), and is therefore not at all relative?
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May 19, 2017
You'd have to ask the author. :)

But award shows typically snub superheroes, sf, and fantasy (i.e., "genre"). So on the one hand, yes, comparing award-winning shows to genre shows is not relevant or relative.

On the other hand, it seems like an impossible standard. Arrow is never going to get the awards and recognition that Jane the Virgin does.
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May 19, 2017
@Gislef , it's not just the network vs cable. It's the basic premise of adult vs children that's the issue.

We had fantasy\sci-fi shows that gotten their fair share of awards while being on networks rather than cable. From X-Files to Lost and what not. They are always adult oriented shows which is their doorstep.
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May 19, 2017
If we're talking TV, we were talking network TV. Cable shows and films are a different breed of cat.
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May 19, 2017
Yes and no. Awards don't deal with fantasy usually since it's the assumption that fantasy is for "kids". But when you are dealing with adult based fantasy, awards pile in heart bit. Game of Thrones, Westworld, Dark Knight, Lord of the Rings etc.
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May 19, 2017
Or any genre show vs. a non-genre show.
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May 19, 2017
As someone who enjoys the genre, and likes the CW superhero shows to varying degrees (despite some very notable issues), I kind of have to agree. Not to the extent where I think they should get rid of those shows from the schedule all together, but more in the sense where I think it could be toned down.

I think Marvel has the right idea of how to have a ton of shows, while not making it feel like as much of a chore. They just have one series that sticks to the classic 20+ episode format, and all the rest of their shows are in the range of 8-13 episodes long, and are spaced out throughout the year. And while they may have the cross-overs (most notably The Defenders) and references, it's much easier to pick and choose the ones you like without having to worry about missing important story elements from the shows you do skip. Whereas it seems a lot more daunting and time-consuming to keep up with the Arrowverse, since they have three 20+ seasons going at the same time, along with a slightly shorter Legends of Tomorrow. And while they're saying Black Lightning isn't part of the Arrowverse (then again, neither was Supergirl until it crossed over with The Flash), it still contributes to the overwhelming presence of comic book shows on the CW.

All that being said, I think it could be best if they reduced the episode number to around 13 episodes. And that way, on top of reducing the Arrowverse fatigue, it would also allow them to have more focused seasons.
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May 19, 2017
For an article about superheroes, it talked too much about "Jane the Crazy Ex-Virgin." Please, file these shows under "O' as in "Oblivion." I expect that next time, when an article about female-centric comedies is written, it'll be all about The Flash and The League of Doom.
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May 19, 2017
I would say that having Smallville on your network for 10 years makes Arrow's existence more about wanting to find the next Smallville rather than them taking a 'risk' - they just incorporating the Dark Knight tone to it instead of the bright lights that Smallville had.... No risk at all IMO - it was not dissimilar to several other 'dark' shows on the CW

Also - Kaitlin really has some weird hard on for JtV and Cex-GF :/ awards mean fuck all tbh (ask The Wire, Buffy, Hannibal) and the only critical acclaim i see for JtV is by you - maybe i am not looking in the right places but the show barely gets a mention on other sites i frequent
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May 19, 2017
They need more supernatural shows ala The Vampire Diaries or The Originals. Maybe try witches again, or their own zombie outbreak show.
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May 19, 2017
They are working on a Charmed spin off. But frankly, Witches never did too well since the days of Bewitched.
Charmed was the exception because they went the Buffy route and made it more action based.

But other than that? Everything else failed big time. Secret Circle? failed. Eastwick? Failed. Witches of East end? Failed.
The genre doesn't seem to have enough appeal to work.

Vampires are pretty much over. I think the only vampire show right now is van Helsing and it's not doing too well.

Monster hunting in general? Well... Sleepy Hollow tried and somewhat succeeded but couldn't last too long. Shadow Hunters go such awful reviews I never even bothered with it.

Zombies are already done to the death. iZombie succeeded because it stood apart. Walking Dead is getting too boring despite Negan and Z-Nation doesn't get the numbers you want.

For your tolkin-style fantasy you have Shanara which was pretty bad despite getting a second season. But shows of that nature are really expensive. Legend of the Seeker couldn't last too long. They are working on a reboot of Xena though.

I personally would love for more sci-fi\fantasy shows that based on either original material or at least something not very known or recent, but don't think the odds of that are that great.

I still think they really need to work on adaptations of more Mangas and general asian stories. Some aren't really known that well and they have some really amazing works. When is the Deathnote remake going to be on Netflix already?
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May 19, 2017
Oh, and almost forgot the Werewolf genere which pretty much had Teen Wolf (which fell apart a long time ago) and Bitten which never took off much.
I doubt anyone will try to revive it anytime soon.

Time Travel was the biggest trend they tried to push this year - with almost everything in it being thrown away. Time after Time and Frequency both cancelled and Timeless did but then didn't?

And there's also the X-Files genere of procedural into supernatural issues. Supernatural is going strong still. Haven was great until it was ruined and I suppose you can also push Warehouse 13 and Librarians in there for the more light hearted audience and all of them were pretty successful.
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May 19, 2017
iZombie is about zombies (granted - last season's finale was the furthest it got to be a zombie outbreak show) - but still - i do not see the point

Containment was about an epidemic - not necessarily zombies but similar genre - and bombed

The Secret Circle bombed (for some odd reason) so i can't see them taking a chance with another one of them

TVD has just ended and you already want another Vampire show? sorry but Vampires aren't relevant any more - and The Originals is still airing - so what's the point in adding another one of those shows?

Just expect more comic-book dross and revivals/reboots of shows that should have stayed dead

I personally want Teen dramas back again - and i mean shows like OTH, Gossip Girl, Hart of Dixie and 90210 - not these teen dramas that HAVE to have some kind of mystery (Shitty Riverdale)
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