The End of an Era: A Eulogy for NBC's Thursday-Night "Must-See TV" Comedy Block

This week marks an important milestone in television history. For the first time in 33 years, NBC did not air a single sitcom as part of its regular Thursday-night programming. There have been a few exceptions, of course, especially during random summer nights, Peter Pan Live! (which was in some ways a different form of comedy), or big events like the 2007–2008 WGA strike, but as far as regularly scheduled programming is concerned, it was a significant and symbolic move for NBC.


REMEMBERING THE LEGACY OF MUST-SEE TV

While we're probably best served not buying into the mythology that NBC has built on its own accord over the last three decades (what up, 20 Years of Must-See TV special from 2002), it's impossible to ignore the legacy of the network's Thursday-night comedy block. For at least two generations of people, NBC Thursdays were the bastion for intelligent small-screen comedy. Trying to choose between the network's three big comedy eras—the early-to-mid 80s, which featured Cheers, The Cosby Show, Night Court, and Family Ties; the Friends, Seinfeld, and Mad About You trifecta of the 1990s; and the recent run with 30 Rock, The Office, Parks and Recreation, and Community—is like trying to name your favorite sports team's best individual season, or maybe even your favorite Kardashian.

And the legacy is just as pronounced within the industry. Since the fall of 1982 when Cheers opened its doors, NBC comedies have done extremely well at the Emmys, earning 16 wins for writing, 11 for directing, 29 combined for supporting actor/actress, 29 combined for lead actor/actress, and 19 for outstanding series. That dominance has been curbed a bit by the recent success of Modern Family and some CBS and HBO actors (Jim Parsons and Julia Louis-Dreyfus, most notably), but it still illustrates NBC's extended preeminence in the comedy department. (It's worth noting that many of these wins came for Frasier, a show that didn't air all of its episodes on Thursday, but that did spend chunks of three or four seasons there.)

Whether or not you've enjoyed NBC's sitcoms—no doubt there were some awful ones, both in the mid-'90s heyday of the network's "We'll Do Whatever We Want" approach and the '00s era of "Jeff Zucker Has No Idea What He's Doing"—its Thursday block has been nothing short of a cultural institution. From the days of the mass audience in the '80s and early '90s to the hyper-fragmented, uber-nichified audiences of the 2010s, the programming generally thrived, and adapted fairly consistently enough to survive. On one network, on one particular night, American audiences knew exactly what to expect, and the cachet of "Must-See TV" helped transform shows like Seinfeld and Friends into global phenomenons. Saying goodbye feels like losing a fundamental piece of American television history.


WHERE NBC WENT WRONG WITH THURSDAYS

Of course, though NBC's decision to forego any and all comedy presence on Thursday (we'll be getting the dramatic trio of upcoming miniseries The Slap, newly transplanted from Mondays The Blacklist, and brand-new spy drama Allegiance, by the way) makes me sad, it shouldn't come as much of a surprise. Depending on who you ask, NBC's Thursday comedy block actually died with the end of Friends, those weird years where it aired alongside Donald Trump's Apprentice and later The Jay Leno Show, or when The Office and 30 Rock ended a few years ago. Heck, it's possible you didn't even realize that NBC was still airing comedies on Thursdays at all, given that the two sitcoms it debuted there this past fall were A to Z and Bad Judge, both of which have already been canceled. Parks and Rec, the sole survivor from the "Comedy Night Done Right," is nearing the end of a burned-off final season on Tuesdays, while newer offerings like About A Boy and Marry Me have been kept away from Thursday because it's become such a poisoned well of a night for the network (and they're both on the verge of cancellation, anyway). The situation is so dire that NBC and the studio straight-up sold The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt to Netflix before airing a single episode.

If you want to point fingers at the current NBC executive team, primarily chairman Bob Greenblatt, you absolutely could. Greenblatt took the job in early 2011, inheriting a Thursday-night schedule that featured a young Community and Parks and an aging-but-still respected 30 Rock and The Office. Since then, he and NBC have worked quite hard to move away from niche comedy and toward more broadly appealing offerings. Greenblatt unabashedly promoted this broad comedy initiative before the 2012–2013 and 2013–2014 TV seasons, but the sitcoms developed under that directive (Animal Practice, Guys with Kids, The Michael J. Fox Show, Sean Saves the World, etc.) all failed to garner a second season.

Yes, About a Boy is still around, but it seems sensible to imagine that its survival had something to do with the network wanting to stay in business with series creator Jason Katims, he of Parenthood and Friday Night Lights fame. Like Up All Night and Whitney before it, About a Boy is unlikely to see a third season—something no Greenblatt-led comedy has achieved as of yet. Meanwhile, shows developed by former NBC comedy talents (The Mindy Project and Brooklyn Nine-Nine) are continuing to deliver "NBC-esque" programs elsewhere.

Consider the following: Since the season after Friends ended (2004–2005), NBC has aired or produced at least a few episodes of 47 sitcoms (including shows produced elsewhere, like Welcome to Sweden). Only 11 of those series were renewed for a second season, and only five of those 11 (My Name Is Earl, The Office, 30 Rock, Community, and Parks and Rec) have made it to a Season 3. But in Greenblatt's four years at the helm alone, NBC has offered up 26 different comedies, and 20 of them have failed or never even aired (with Craig Robinson's effort still to come, maybe). That means the network has been churning out more comedies than ever in the last four years, with basically no success.


Page 2: Why NBC isn't the only one struggling, and what's next for its Thursday nights

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Feb 08, 2015
Lineup was best in the classic 80s era when it was Cosby, Family Ties, Cheers, Night Court, and HSB. In the 90s (technically the only time it was referred to as Must See TV) it became what Phil Simms referred to as a "double decker shit sandwich", Friends, Seinfeld, and ER with awful shows (oh boy Union Square and Boston Common!) in between and completely ignoring a brilliant Tuesday sitcom that would have made a perfect companion for Seinfeld at 9:30. Had they not thrown away 8:30 and 9:30 The Apprentice wouldn't have had to air at 9pm by the time Friends ended.

The lineup was practically dead in '05 before they moved My Name is Earl and The Office to it. Now I've loved this last decade of the lineup but the truth is they went too far with critically acclaimed niche programming. They should have tried to balance it out with something more mainstream at one point. That's why its dead at this point. You can't expect people to watch 30 Rock if you don't give it a somewhat broader lead.
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Feb 08, 2015
NBC should have kept Kimmy Schmidt. At least they'd have something funny that could be talked about.
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Feb 07, 2015
Cory, while you make an interesting argument and some great points, looking at the trends from the last 5 years instead of the last 10 is really where the issue stands out. Yeah, it's hard on everybody developing and sticking with sitcoms that last, but look at how they're developing lasting shows...

ABC has 6 sitcoms currently: 2 shows at 6 seasons, then 1 each 4 seasons and 2 seasons, and 2 currently on their first season.

CBS has 5 sitcoms currently: 1 is 12 and out, 1 is 8 seasons in and the top show on tv, then you have 5 years, 4 years, and 2 years.

Fox has 7 sitcoms currently: 26 years, 16 years, 2 shows at 4 years, 3 years, 2 years, and 1 within this year and is on its way out.

NBC has 4 sitcoms currently: 1 that's 6 seasons and out, the rest are within a year old (About a Boy is the eldest at 2 seasons and out, Undatable is a season and a half).

You can say it's hard on everybody, but there's a HUGE difference between how the other networks have developed shows over time vs. how NBC has developed nothing but failures over time. Yes, Greenblatt is definitely leading it down the drain, but the network called him up as replacement to an already-failing network that lacked any and all sense of a working vision. NBC's identity lacks any sense of a distinctive voice and is utterly useless in developing series in any genre that are genuinely compelling and draw an audience - at best they get or the other, or the slip into a gray area that kinda feels like both but secretly isn't holding the line on one (I'm lookin' at you, The Blacklist). NBC is in a creative tailspin and it's not just the man at the top to blame, it's the whole corporation's management.
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Feb 09, 2015
You're not wrong by any means, I was just trying to work through some of the reasons we could give Greenblatt the benefit of the doubt. I guess I totally understand what he was TRYING to do—he's done it very poorly, but I get the logic of it, you know? That doesn't excuse developing bad shows. Period.
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Feb 10, 2015
I think even if he and the network stood by bad shows, they'd at least have something, but they aren't developing sitcoms they want to stand behind under any circumstances. They don't stand for anything. Even a weak voice is still a voice, but NBC doesn't get that.
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Feb 07, 2015
The sad thing is that these days networks are so trigger happy to pull shows they don't give them a chance to grow and develop. Over the last year, I've bought seasons 1-5 of Night Court (6-9 I'll get to eventually) and it took years to develop the right cast. They lost two bailiffs that died before casting Marsha Warfield as Roz. Mac got added in season two and Christine didn't get added until season 3. Now a days you get maybe 10 episodes to become a hit or they pull the plug. A show NBC did a few years ago was Kings and I thought it was outstanding but they pulled the plug after like 6 or 7 episodes and burned the rest of the season off during the summer. I would have liked to seen where season 2 would have went with David going into exile at the end of the show.
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Feb 09, 2015
Kings was outstanding! Too bad it didn't get the shot it deserved.
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Feb 08, 2015
Night Court was instantly good; it was great right off the bat. It doesn't matter that Markie or Mac weren't there yet; NBC knew they had something right away. That's true that networks often pull the plug too soon (and I hate when they refuse to eventually air all of the episodes they ordered) but generally you can tell right away if there's something there.
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Feb 10, 2015
Sorry, didn't mean to imply it was a bad show. I just prefer Mac over Lana. Christine over Liz, and definitely Roz over Flo (Selma was pretty funny though)
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Feb 07, 2015
Sadly, the financial stakes are too high these days for networks to take those risks, producing and airing TV has gotten exponentially more expensive since the glorious sitcom heyday of the '70s and '80s. There's more competition from newer networks, then cable stations, and even now direct access entertainment on the internet.

And even when networks want to take risks on developing a show over a period of time, they have a shareholder base to answer to who want to make more money and don't trust as much so action on a corporate level overrides patience. For example, Enlisted on Fox was renewed originally but that decision was reversed as the president of the network was ousted by his boss.
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Feb 09, 2015
RIP Enlisted.
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Feb 07, 2015
Roz was added in season 4. Selma Diamond and Florence Halop were the two bailiffs that passed away.
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Feb 07, 2015
When they decided to stop making funny comedies and start making things like Whitney, their Thursday Night Comedy Block was doomed. That they don't understand HOW it happened is adorable.
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Feb 07, 2015
I think they know. They made a calculated choice to try something else, to go against history, and it didn't work. Which is why they're doing all dramas there now.
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Feb 07, 2015
Everything is subjective. What one person finds funny, another may not. We talk about 30 Rock as if it's a successful comedy because we talk to other people who find it funny, but its mediocre ratings suggest a lot of people didn't find it funny at all. Meanwhile, Whitney's ratings were notably stronger than 30 Rock's last 4 seasons.
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Feb 08, 2015
That's true; the shows that have been on in recent years haven't been the huge hits we perceive them to be. Not even The Office was technically a huge hit. That took a toll on NBC and Comcast decided to try the polar opposite of what had been produced previously. But those made no impact whatsoever on pop culture or the critics. Whitney essentially needed even bigger ratings than what it got in order to justify NBC keeping it on the air due to its' lack of critical acclaim. That's something CBS manages to be able to balance out and ABC's lineup is mostly balanced as well (CBS usually tends to care more about the ratings but even they've begun to reign in things i.e. The Millers' cancellation).


The biggest problem with NBC during the Comedy Night Done Right era was the ever increasing splinter of the audience among niche creatively acclaimed audiences. The other networks have found a way to calm both sides. NBC on the other hand went quickly from very sophisticated college educated comedies to "ooh look a monkey is a doctor!".
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Feb 08, 2015
Yeah, they're just driving them to Netflix. They've even helped them get started on that with Kimmy Schmidt.
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Feb 08, 2015
CBS and ABC's successful sitcoms have a specific voice and energy. CBS lost their minds trying The Millers and The McCarthys which weren't remotely up their alley, and look what's left: The Big Bang Theory, Mom, Mike & Molly, 2 Broke Girls, Two and a Half Men, basically a variant on the same snarky tone each, and 3 of them are produced by the same guy.

ABC basically has 3 things to make a sitcom out of - female audience draw, minorities, families - and then they cut shows almost at random (it's almost certainly based on cost analysis though).

NBC has no voice at all anymore, Whitney was brash and drew big numbers, but then they have nothing to pair it with and it withered. Marry Me and About a Boy? Couldn't be different from each other. So like you said, NBC only seems to know how to splinter their audiences.
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Feb 07, 2015
Interesting chart, it seems old fart CBS has the best track record as opposed to the other younger demo chasing networks

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Feb 07, 2015
They've certainly had more long-running shows, and therefore less holes on the schedule. NBC (and ABC) are always trying to plug a half-dozen holes in the schedule, which is never good.
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Feb 07, 2015
TV is hard especially when all you do is crank out even blander versions of the same bland generic rom-com and family comedies that have been done a million times before and filed a million times before. And having the front door of the apartment on the right side of the stage instead of the left isn't a Wow, fresh, new angle.
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Feb 09, 2015
I lol'd.
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Feb 07, 2015
Great work Cory, one of your best. I think most of NBC's woes still stem back to The Jay Leno Show plus terrible creative decisions in recent years haven't helped. And possibly what's hurt them the most is the fact that Thursday was a juggernaut comedy night for so long. It made it much harder for NBC to let it go. Having it die a slow death in recent years hasn't helped anyone. They should have acted quickly and shaken things up when they still had enough comedic critical mass to draw an audience.
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Feb 07, 2015
Thank you! I worked really hard on it. I appreciate that; truly.

Yeah, burning away 5 hours a week on Leno is still a historically bad call—even if it was actually kind of prescient. Zucker knew that 10pm was becoming the timeslot where people DVR stuff from earlier in the night (and that's true), so he wanted something cheap. But that slowed down their production pipeline in a way that was only exacerbated by some of the issues I talk about above.
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Feb 08, 2015
Watching The Jay Leno Show was like witnessing Hurricane Andrew rip apart Florida! Network was immediately a wasteland afterwards.
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Feb 09, 2015
Excellent comment jimmy
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Feb 07, 2015
Well they had the best comedy since Seinfeld on their hands with Community - but they didn't know how to promote it - scheduled it on different nights - ultimately deciding to put it up against - The Big Bang Theory! Arghhh NBC what were you thinking?!?!? At least Yahoo has stepped in - and with Community as its only major show - I'm expecting huge things from Community Season 6 starting March 17th on Yahoo Screen - FU NBC! Well season 6, then The Movie, then season 7, 8, etc.... heheh...

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Feb 07, 2015
I mean...nobody watched Community before CBS moved Big Bang over. NBC has done a lot of dumb stuff, but that they kept Community on the air for FIVE years? Not one of them.
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Feb 07, 2015
That's unfair to Community to ignore the network's hand in the failure. Compare the numbers on the Community timeslot to everything else NBC put in that slot to help push up numbers and nothing did any better. 30 Rock and Parks & Rec pulled the same numbers and worse, and I think they did a few of The Office in that slot to thundering absences.

Yes, they kept it, but they never treated it as a crown jewel that developed loyalty, they mangled it and pushed it around and complained when it inherited the network's failures.
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Feb 09, 2015
I don't necessarily consider a show that ran for five years a 'failure' though. They didn't treat the show particularly well after S2, but they're not the only network to do that. ABC did it to Happy Endings, Fox did it to Enlisted, etc.
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Feb 10, 2015
That's a lot of benefit of the doubt for NBC.
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Feb 09, 2015
Well-put and very true.
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Feb 07, 2015
just proves how smart of a comedy Community is. Americans are too stupid to understand it. how ANYONE with a brain finds big bang theory funny just reinforces this
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Feb 07, 2015
It was actually 5 shows that made it to 3 seasons on ABC. Cougar Town did 3 seasons on ABC before moving to TBS in it's fourth.
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Feb 07, 2015
You're right! I got the seasons mixed up. I'll fix that.
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Feb 07, 2015
This reminds me of ABC's TGIF which use to be a TV staple of sitcoms.
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Feb 07, 2015
NBC Britta'd comedy.
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Feb 09, 2015
This is NBC's darkest timeline.
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Feb 07, 2015
they're streets behind for sure..
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Feb 07, 2015
What an excellent essay on what is essentially a part of our culture that has come to an end. Thanks for the creativity and effort! As someone who watched Cosby/Family Ties/Cheers/Night Court in my mid teens, Seinfeld and Friends as a young adult, and then 30 Rock, Parks and Rec, and Community as a ... not-so-young-adult, NBC Thursday has basically produced my favorite comedies for as long as I've been watching television. However, I now watch nothing live and everything online and we've all known for a long time Network TV's days are numbered, so I think we'll see a lot of eras ending over the next decade or so, and a whole lot more niche programming from smaller sources. My 7 year old daughter's favorite show is a YouTube channel from a small self produced few person group, and to her that is totally normal, and is probably the future of most programming, except spectacle.
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Feb 07, 2015
scrubs?
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Feb 07, 2015
Scrubs was a Tuesday sitcom until NBC's Thursday ran out of gas and they tried to move it to fill holes, which didn't work.
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Feb 08, 2015
Even earlier than that, in Scrubs 2nd season, NBC put it on directly after Friends. Apparently they thought it could one day replace it. Show never could keep the audience and it got shipped back to Tuesdays. Little did NBC know it was essentially an example of what was to come.
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Feb 09, 2015
Scrubs at least had a flavor though, it FELT like a Tuesday NBC comedy in that it was quirky and a little narrower focus.
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Feb 10, 2015
NBC kept trying to replace it on Tuesdays. It was just like Parks and Rec or 30 Rock, a critically acclaimed show that as a result caused NBC to keep postponing cancellation.


Futurama would have been alright if they wouldn't have kept it in a slot where football constantly pre-empted it.
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Feb 09, 2015
I think Scrubs held its line on Tuesdays at 4 or 5 years, didn't it? That's pretty good considering the downfall of NBC was its heyday.

I never really thought about why Scrubs wasn't able to grow beyond its narrow audience focus, I'll need to ruminate on that. It had multiple strong female characters, it had lots of laughs... it was a bit too smart and silly for its time perhaps, not unlike Futurama which also suffered weak audience exposure.
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Feb 09, 2015
I could never really figure why it couldn't outgrow its narrow focus. Great show but when you can't hold onto much of Friends or Will and Grace's audience it's hard to blame NBC for keeping it on the fence for much of its run.


Unfortunately for Scrubs, by the time it started, Tuesdays had become pretty much nonexistent. It started to resemble an abandoned building that a homeless person started living in.
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Feb 07, 2015
So what current series do people think of when they hear the word comedy? What comedies are being watched at the moment? I watch Brooklyn Nine-Nine, New Girl, The Big Bang Theory, and now Fresh Off the Boat. That's not many, and of them all, I only really enjoy TBBT (but that has its slumps, too).

I'm wondering if there's a similar problem on cable? The only cable comedy series I watch is Looking (and I'm catching up on Girls) and I wouldn't really consider them comedies, more dramas with heavy comedic aspects. What cable comedies are people watching? Perhaps the sitcom is a dying genre? Or at the very least a genre evolving into series that look more like what you'd find on cable than network television (i.e. having a lot more dramatic aspects).
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Feb 07, 2015
This is my list of currently-watching sitcoms (shows marked * are non-network):
American Dad!*
Bob's Burgers
The Big Bang Theory
Community*
The Exes*
Family Guy
Fresh Off the Boat
It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia*
Louie*
Modern Family
The Simpsons
Sirens*
Undateable
Workaholics*

And here's a list of shows I'll watch if other folks I'm with want to watch them:
About a Boy
Blackish
Cristela
The Goldbergs
Marry Me
The Middle
Parks & Recreation
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Feb 06, 2015
Let's not forget that the comedy block was always back-ended by a superb drama. We laughed and then we were riveted by Hill Street Blues or ER!

I still maintain the 84-85 Thursday night lineup was the greatest in tv history: Cosby, Family Ties, Cheers, something at 9:30 and then Hill Street Blues.
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Feb 07, 2015
Night Court or Buffalo Bill was at 9:30 (8:30 where I lived) during 84-85.
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Feb 07, 2015
Buffalo Bill, I think ran only in 83-84 and there were some misfires in that 9:30 slot (like Jim Carrey's "The Duck Factory" and then Night Court. Good memory
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Feb 06, 2015
I love reading these tv industry think pieces, thank you Cory!

Thursday night has been a dead zone for a while for me. After reading this I was trying to think of any NBC shows that I still watch. Once Parks and Rec ends...I think that's it.
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Feb 06, 2015
Great piece. I've been there since the beginning and I really miss Must See TV. Even now I record Parks & Rec and watch it on Thursday. One thing that hit NBC hard was when CBS moved The Big Bang Theory from Monday to Thursday opposite Community. Poor Community didn't have a chance. I boycotted TBBT that season, but nobody noticed, so I went back to it.

Over my lifetime I have seen waves of good comedies come and go. In the '70s CBS was the place to be on Saturday night (Mary Tyler Moore, The Bob Newhart Show, etc.), but a few years later there was a wasteland, until Cheers hit the scene. In 2007 Back to You was the best new show I could find, and I didn't even watch the whole season. But then Parks & Rec & Community came along and everything was funny again. I'm hoping there is a new era of great comedies around the corner, but hope is fading because of the niche programming you talked about.

The NBC prime time execs should have done what their late night counterparts would later do, and lean on SNL for it's comedies. NBC might as well be LMN, the Lorne Michaels Network.
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Feb 08, 2015
That's actually what they've been doing, it's just run out of gas. The Office, 30 Rock, and Parks and Rec were all created by SNL alums and the latter two starred them. Out of those three shows only The Office ever produced solid numbers, the other two NBC held onto with hope more people would start watching (they didn't; that's why they're gone). Up All Night was created by an alum, Marry Me stars one, and Bad Judge was produced by two.


Of course late night is essentially an extension of SNL now. You can't go far without seeing an SNL alum in something!
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Feb 08, 2015
Thank goodness for Kimmel and Late Late Show, I guess?
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Feb 08, 2015
Until Craig left.
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Feb 07, 2015
Lorne Michaels has produced some pretty underperforming stuff lately:
Mulaney
Late Night with Seth Meyers
The Maya Rudolph Show
Up All Night
MacGruber (the movie)
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Feb 08, 2015
Portlandia's been successful.
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Feb 08, 2015
Critically perhaps, although even that is a bit slanted due to who does and doesn't review it. But its "big numbers" for the premiere this year were sub-400k total live, not key demo but total. It's hardly "successful" by industry metrics, it's a little niche show on a little niche cabler. I'm not trying to bash it, I'm just pointing out that it's a small-fry success at best. One could point to Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon being a success, but that would require sacrificing dignity.
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Feb 10, 2015
Late night tv used to cost nothing and get the network very little in returns, so the nets didn't really care what was on so long as it made return. Now that domain actually has value, and the nets stick their bland, corporate noses in so that it becomes a generic shell game. The only one who did anything different was Craig Ferguson and he quit.
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Feb 10, 2015
"Late Night" used to be the place for ground breaking comedy during the Letterman and Conan eras, but with Fallon and now even more with Seth the show has become so broad and nowhere near as creative.
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Feb 09, 2015
Critically, Seth is not doing so hot. In ratings, he's underperforming but not a disaster.
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Feb 09, 2015
Yeah, Portlandia would definitely be cancelled by NBC. It would probably be a continuation of the same fractured niche audience they've given up on for Thursdays.


I genuinely think that anything SNL related is a goldmine but it's true that Lorne doesn't have that much success as a producer except when it comes to late night programming. He's fairly new to it; 30 Rock has to be the first thing in primetime he had some success with.


Is Seth really doing that bad?
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Feb 09, 2015
True enough, IFC isn't aiming high and he has delivered something that hasn't flopped and has given identity. I just meant that Lorne Michaels can't really be held up as a master producer for NBC merely because Portlandia is doing better than ever before when those numbers would be cancellation numbers for even The CW (unless your show is titled Beauty and the Beast, apparently).
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Feb 08, 2015

"One could point to Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon being a success, but that would require sacrificing dignity."

LOL

I guess it all has to do with what IFC's expectations are. A lot of these cable outlets have a tendency to care more about building a brand/reputation that allows them to hold a provider hostage for money (and the providers of course hold us hostage as well).
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Feb 08, 2015
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Feb 08, 2015
You can't go far without seeing an SNL alum!
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Feb 07, 2015
Community rules! All hail Chang!
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Feb 06, 2015
With "Parks and Recreation" on its way out, the only thing I'll watch regularly on NBC after that's over will be "Saturday Night Live".
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Feb 07, 2015
I thought I had more, but I just looked at my list and it won't be pretty, just SNL, Undateable, and The Blacklist which is barely hanging on by a thread. I'd like to say Constantine but I think its run is up before Parks & Rec leaves.
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Feb 06, 2015
4 or 5 years ago I was giving everything a chance. 2 years ago I gave up. Nothing new on the broadcasts were making me laugh so I just stopped watching new stuff. I've still got my current shows but once those are done I may be done with the big 4. I'm tired of the formulaic boring dramas and the crappy laugh track comedies. I'm glad we have more options for quality TV now with cable, premium cable, netflix etc...
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Feb 06, 2015
I just realized when Parks leaves the air, the only live-action comedy I'll be watching on the networks is Brooklyn Nine-Nine. As someone who appreciates good comedy, this is depressing.
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Feb 06, 2015
I do not think it is just the comedies. If one would to compile some statistics FOR Drama shows across the major networks like the one above, I think NBC would still be the network that had the most cancelled shows.

It is a vicious cycle. The network is too trigger happy so viewers might stay away, the numbers then got too low and they cancel the shows thinking there are no audience. I am not sure if I want to start watching Allegiance knowing how trigger happy they are.

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Feb 07, 2015
they pull the trigger quick cause the stuff is garbage hat won't get better over time
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Feb 07, 2015
There are many shows that should be given a chance. Crisis and Heroes are very good example. I know there are haters but they are many fans too. Heroes had a huge international market which they should have exploited !
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Feb 06, 2015
I just don't think that NBC in its current incarnation can deliver a good comedy. Or really even show anymore. The shows that they have that are actually good, they have pretty much stumbled on them, Grimm, Hannibal, maybe include Blacklist and the Chicago series. The two best ones in my opinion are Grimm and Hannibal and they have succeeded despite NBC, not because of NBC.
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Feb 06, 2015
I forgot that Hannibal was an NBC show!
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Feb 06, 2015
It is pretty much an anomaly.
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Feb 07, 2015
It's their "prestige" show, the way Community used to be kept around until they meddled.
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