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The Newsroom Episode 2: Buzzkill

The Newsroom S01E02: "News Night 2.0"

Last week's debut episode of The Newsroom was almost like a master class in how to make every single little thing work exactly right when it comes to television journalism. It was an idealistic view of what TV news could be, a sort of opening salvo in the direction of all things cable news to say, "Here's why we hate what you've become." It was fun to watch, but it also made you wonder exactly how slick this show was going to be going forward. Were we going to get week after week of top-flight journalism? Or were things eventually going to start to fly off the rails? This week's episode, "News Night 2.0," answered that question in rather resounding fashion.

The events of "News Night 2.0" were a trainwreck. And I don't mean that as an insult to the writing, acting, or performances. I mean that all the forward momentum News Night grabbed from its coverage of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill was nearly destroyed thanks to a few careless mistakes and a staff still not quite on the same page. The show produced this week was a disaster. A painful, horrific, almost unbearable disaster that can only be described as sub-Nancy Grace in quality. I literally cringed in my seat as I watched it unfold, and that was exactly the response this episode needed to elicit. It needed to show the other side of the coin, to reveal what can happen if these guys aren't on the ball every week, and what the consequences of failure actually are. While "News Night 2.0" didn't necessarily follow through on all its potential consequences, it still proved to be exactly the kind of episode we needed coming off of last week's almost aggressively optimistic debut.

First, the set-up. Riding high on the sudden burst of energy in the titular newsroom, this week's story was Arizona's controversial immigration law. You know, the one where Arizona was going to start making immigrants carry their papers with them at all times and allow police to pull over anyone they might suspect of being an illegal immigrant (read: Mexican). The one that was mostly shot down by the Supreme Court. This week, it was up to the staff to bring in some heavy hitters to talk about the newly passed law on television, but before that, we had our first staff meeting to get out of the way.

Just to get it out of the way now, I'm going to lead with my one serious complaint about this episode, and potentially the tone of this series. Aaron Sorkin is one of the few writers out there who's well-versed in crafting stories that can both be high drama and high comedy. Unfortunately, I don't feel like The Newsroom is quite balanced yet. Most of this week's personal dramas pertained to MacKenzie's previous relationship with Will, and also her inability to understand a new email system. After talking with her new financial segment reporter for the show (Olivia Munn, making her first appearance), MacKenzie learned that gossip around the office is that Will is kind of a horrible human being, and that they broke up because he cheated on her. MacKenzie was horrified by this, not just because the staff has such a negative view of Will, but because the literal opposite is true. She cheated on him.

In an effort to try and rectify things, she sent an email to Will. Except because she doesn't understand the new email system (it involves asterisks, or something), she inadvertently sent an email explaining that she cheated on Will to the entire company. Whoops!

Look, we've all heard at least one of those horrible "sent my naked pictures to everyone I work with" type of stories, but the way this week's episode went about setting up this gag was incredibly hamfisted. The whole email system thing was just shoved into a completely unrelated segment, the jokes about it weren't funny, and MacKenzie's reaction to the accidental email blast was so ludicrously over-the-top (she actually smashed a guy's BlackBerry just to try to get him to not read the email) that I half-expected her to accidentally slip on a banana peel and go crashing through a window.

I've got to say that I'm just not sold on the comedic undertone the show has taken thus far. I like much of the dialogue, but when it feels like we're already getting within inches of Emily Mortimer taking pratfalls only two weeks in, maybe it's time to dial things back a notch. This episode was positively fraught with people losing their shit, and yet somewhere in there we were also supposed to just shift gears and take in the quieter, more dramatic stuff too. This is a show that lurches whenever it tries to focus on a single character. We want to learn more about these people, but the devices used thus far to try and dig into everyone's back story (boilerplate relationship conflicts, presumably hilarious misunderstandings) aren't serving the rest of the show well. Sorkin is capable of doing better.

I know this because much of "News Night 2.0" was actually pretty terrific. Allison Pill gave another standout performance this week as she tried her hand at, and ultimately dropped the ball on, a pre-interview with a staffer from Governor Jan Brewer's office. She screwed things up so royally that with an hour-and-a-half until air, the show's lynchpin guest was suddenly absent. The staff was left dangling, and forced to cobble together a motley crew of racist self-published authors, a former Miss America contestant voted off for her controversial views on the law, and a guy literally sitting in his easy chair holding a shotgun (played by the great character actor Marshall Bell). You can imagine how well this conversation ended up going, and how Will, not known for his forgiving attitude, handled it.

Pill is great because, despite the fact that she's spouting impossibly speedy dialogue, she still comes across as an emotional human being. Her freakout over the cancellation resonated because you actually felt bad for her. I commented last week that I was having trouble finding some humanity in many of these characters, but Pill's Maggie Jordan is clearly the best-realized character thus far. While I think her weekly relationship drama has the potential to wear thin pretty quickly, I love what she, as an actress, is bringing to the role.

My other favorite is still Sam Waterston, who sadly doesn't have much to do outside of playing online poker and not-so-subtly threatening a network executive known to feed Will ratings information week-to-week. Not much really happened in this section of the episode, save but to illustrate that Will is still torn on this new direction for the show, given the potential for a ratings disaster if he doesn't pander to the audience. This came back later when Will, on the fly, decided to insert a bit of commentary on a Sarah Palin gaffe from Fox News. MacKenzie wanted no part of it, but Will went ahead anyway, and the segment flopped as bad as, if not worse than, the whole immigration debacle.

I liked seeing these people fail. Not because I'm rooting against them, but because it gave necessary insight into how Sorkin plans to treat them for the duration of the season. We know that Will won't suddenly turn cuddly any time soon, but you can see him warming to his young staff, even as everything goes haywire. You can see that Maggie is going to be struggling with career and relationship issues for a while at least, and Pill is making those moments work. We know that MacKenzie is basically a great producer and a slightly unhinged personality, and that her desire to see News Night become something special will require a lot of effort on her part, effort that may or may not be undone by her own manic personality (seriously, can we get her some Xanax for next week?).

Other characters remain more opaque. We know that Don, Maggie's boyfriend, is a dick, but is he enough of a dick to eventually be cast aside for the nerdier, more sensitive Jim? Will Waterston have more to do than be the fun, maybe slightly insane alcoholic boss? And what, exactly, is Dev Patel's role going to be in all of this? The end of the episode suggested we'll see a good bit more of him in the near future, now that he's made something of a connection with Will. I hope so, because Patel's character is essentially a blank slate right now.

"News Night 2.0" showed me a lot of what I hoped to see from a second episode. It showed us another side to the equation of what this show can be, and it did so while keeping tonal and thematic consistency with what the pilot first showed us. I'm still hoping for a little less sitcom wackiness as the show moves along, but otherwise, the episode delivered on the promise of the pilot. Let's hope Sorkin keeps heading down this path.

Random Thoughts:

– The arrival of Olivia Munn to the proceedings was far more tolerable than I was expecting. I am not generally a fan of Munn's acting work, but her introduction as the series' new financial reporter went off without many hitches. I actually rather liked her and MacKenzie's initial banter in her office. It'll be interesting to see exactly how much of Munn's character we get to see this season.

– I don't know how I feel about the fact that the only two African-American characters are essentially comic relief, at least so far. Look, they're arguing about Obama! Except they're doing it almost entirely in the background of these scenes! Can we find something more substantial for them to do? Maybe? Please?

– That said, I did enjoy Will's incredulous reaction when asking the African-American guy if his name was really Gary Cooper.

– Also on the subject of Will, has anyone else noticed that he scrunches his face up every time he's about to throw a fit? I'm predicting a Jeff Daniels scrunch-face video compilation popping up on YouTube by the end of this season.

– And speaking of YouTube, I'd be remiss if I didn't at least acknowledge the video circulating over the last week of the many repeated Sorkin-isms. If you missed it, it's embedded below. Hey, even the best writers occasionally forget things they've written. Or at least find ways to re-purpose them.

– Hey, remember Radiohead's "High and Dry"? Sorkin sure does.

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I'm just now watching this show. After all the hype, I was hoping for another West Wing. (Well, of course it couldn't be as good as The West Wing, obviously, but. . . ) I guess I'm a little disappointed. I mean, of course it's still statistically one of the best things on television, what with actually dealing with current events intelligently, yet. . . I'm going to go on a bit of a rant here, but it doesn't mean I dislike the show. Just have some problems with it.

One thing that was great about the West Wing was the amount of time they spent on relationships (practically none) and the amount of inter-office romances (just one). I mean, we saw their relationships, and they were almost exclusively with people who they met through work, but they weren't with their immediate co-workers, and many episodes could pass without a single romantic element. I loved the relationships on the West Wing, but they were all the more special because they were a side note. I swear, on the Newsroom, all these guys do is think about their relationships, and make really bad decisions, too. Um, it's not worth dating someone you work with if you don't even have strong feelings for them! It's not worth dating the roommate of someone you work with AND have a crush on just to be nice and get some ass. Ridiculously contrived, unnecessary, unrealistic drama! Are you guys 12? And as you say in this post, the comedy is excessive for a supposed group of professional adults.

These guys just seem really immature. Which is perhaps what I might expect from people working in a newsroom in real life, but in this idealized world, I doubt the makers of the show wanted their characters to be quite so silly all of the time. Especially since I'm comparing it to the West Wing in my head, I keep thinking about how immature these guys are. Thank god they're not the ones (fictionally) running the country!

I don't know, I guess I'm overreacting, but the whole thing is way more soapy than I was expecting! I like soaps, and I like dramas, but this one is kind of jarring the way they're trying to combine the two elements. . . and throwing in excessive comedy as well!

Haha, sorry Aaron Sorkin, I guess I there's only one way to go from The West Wing, and that's down.

That said, obviously I'm going to watch the whole thing, 'cause even half-smart tv is really smart compared to all of the other offerings out there!
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Love the show but it definitely spins to the left rather than reporting the news in an evenhanded way as it portends to do. The episode addressing illegal immigration allowed Maggie to rail against Arizona's new immigration law. Then Will interviewed an intelligent well spoken guest who also spoke out against enforcing the law. The other side was not really allowed to speak. Will's guests for the pro side of the issue were a mute ex-law enforcement officer and a beauty pageant contestant. Funny but not even handed.
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For me, the whole episode was fail; the attempts of humor completely embarrassing. That actress that plays Mackenzie - Jesus, could there be anyone who's less funny and completely over-the-top? And the lines the actors have to pull off? Embarrassing! That's when I think it's really hard to be an actor - the stupid lines you have to say!

I didn't like the development of the blond girl's character either - the assistant promoted to producer or something - how can someone who's so insecure and flat become so brave overnight? I didn't buy it. I'll give The Newsroom one more episode, and that's it.
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I can't believe it! Munn didn't ruin the entire thing! Really enjoyed the scene she was in but that might've been because my expectations were so low. Hopefully they keep the exact same thing in small doses and she doesn't accidentally revert back to her "i'm a hot nerd but not really so i hate you guys but i love you guys, no really i'm better than you guys oh and i'm hot" attitude that she brings everywhere else.
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Sorry but this just got deleted from series manager. I got as far as MacKenzie sending the e-mail to the whole office and then smashing the phone and I couldn't bear anymore. I don't watch 'reality' television but there is only a certain amount of 'unreality' I can abide. No one talks like this, no one behaves like this, bye bye Newsroom.
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I don't know, the RESPONSE to accidentally sending that email is probably quite real. I could EASILY see someone freaking out like that if she sent an email to the whole company saying "Sorry I cheated on you"



The act of sending it... yeh that was dumb and unrealistic. But the response, I buy it.
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I was the opposite, I could see myself sending it by accident but not rushing out and grabbing some guys phone and stomping on it while having tantrum. She is supposed to be a veteran news reporter not a 13 year old girl. Anyway no big loss for me, lots of new shows on the way. Gonna give Perception a try this week although hubby can't stand Eric McCormack.
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Newsroom was pretty good this week. I didn't much like most of the first quarter or so of the episode, but it got better and better, the highlight being around the newscast itself. The end was a little too sappy, but it still worked well. Munn was pretty good in her little role. Unless she's actually improved, I think this role might be good for her limited acting.
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allison pill bugged me in this episode
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Me too. I thought the development of her character too strange. The day before, she was all insecure; next day, she's all brave and doing her own interview, and fighting for her beliefs, honestly, I didn't buy it.
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It's amazing how liberals seem to laud intellect when none of them understands what the Federal Government's job is, what the Constitution states, or even what the definition of a "Nation" is.



This whole episode was a perfect depiction of liberals embracing their pedantic emotions rather than using the common sense that even animals possess. If you showed this in any other Country, they'd laugh their asses off at their complete stupidity.
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I'm from the #4 most democratic country in the world and my ass is still attached. What this show is saying about the nation and the government is admirable. The way it is now is what's hilarious. I can't wrap my head around why things should stay the same in America, at least this show is trying to point out the problems (whether the view is colored or not) with the government and the public.
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My arse is definitely still attached. In case you can't tell from my spelling, I'm also in another country. What I find absurd is that conservatives think that intellect should be derided.
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I've watched from another country. My ass is still firmly attached.
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This show gets a lot of love here on these first two reviews, but it is such a mixed-bag for me. Like mad-pac below, I agree that the highlight of both first episodes was the news show within a show. Each time, I was on the edge of my seat, and for very different reasons. I loved the extremes from knocking it out of the park in the first show to 'we should all be fired' the very next.



The email set-up - "Well, that was predictable....." and extremely ridiculous. Who accidentally uses an asterisk in an email address? It's hard on a keyboard, it's damn near impossible on a BlackBerry. It brought down most of the rest of the episode.



Also, I know to expect it with Sorkin, but every character talking in the exact same rapid-fire, over-exuberant, breathless, idealistic way is not realistic. I may like what they are saying, but I need a little more diversity in my characters. Still there are bright spots in the cast and you were right on point with your appraisals of Amanda Pill and Sam Waterston.
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I didn't like this episode as much as the pilot. I think the pacing was odd and not as fluid as other Sorkin shows. One thing I really loved about Studio 60 was the impeccable timing, and how the comedy fit seamlessly into the dramatic moments. Here it seems force. Hopefully they will find their footing before their viewers find something else to watch. Fortunately, they recently have been renewed for a second season.



I agree with you that Sorkin can do much better. I don't agree about the character development. It's only the second episode and you already want all the characters to be fully developed. Isn't it better to progressively get to know each secondary character, while keeping the principal characters in focus? Now we get to know Maggie, then Neal, then someone else. I also liked Will's reaction about Gary Cooper's name. Thanks for embedding Sorkin-isms video I really enjoyed it.

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Once again, the mock news broadcast was the highlight of the show. Are we to expect that as a formula, a lot of political talk intertwined with office politics and relationship affairs then culminating in some minutes of TV news broadcast in which anything can happen?



I loved they showed not everybody they interview will be brilliant, with a flawless logic and articulate as a Sorkin character. Many people are idiots, others can't articulate their thoughts well, and being on TV can make people very nervous.



The whole email fiasco was forced and rather ridiculous. The idea that you have press asterisk or no asterisk, or then you send an email to everybody seemed like tech mumbo-jumbo written by someone who has no idea how modern technology works, and how modern journalists dealt with it.



Sorkin is not very kind with young blonde women, except if they are savvy journalists following on Will's footsteps. So far both young ladies that interacted with Will in the show said remarkably stupid things. I loved the



"This is not the America I grew up in."

"You're 20 years old. This is the America you grew up in."

"Not in Oklahoma."

"Especially in Oklahoma."



It's an interesting contrast in which they show people who are 18, 20 and think and behave like they have a long life of experience in just about anything. However, there are many smart young students (among whom blondes) who would be able to hold a very intelligent debate with Will. Are they going to show that?



If I were the broken Blackberry guy (by the way, talk about product placement: everybody seemed to use a Blackberry) I'd be pissed off she broke my smartphone and would demand to be paid a new one. Unless that could cost me my job of course...
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The actual show production (with all its awkwardness and drama) salvaged what, to me, was a failure of an episode. Sometimes Sorkin episodes need a delicate balance in order for the sentimental/heavy-handed lines to land without making your eyes roll. When Mac demanded Will be the "moral center" of the show, I couldn't take it. I laughed (1) at the line itself and (2) at the meta-analysis of the The Newsroom (since Will is, obviously, the moral center of the story).



Female characters took a hit, too, this week. I'm with you on Mac's freakout attack after sending the email. Slipping on a banana peel and sliding across the floor for twenty seconds with a repeating background wouldn't have been too far a departure. I couldn't believe someone like her, an EP of extraordinary experience who has been under the pressure of war, would panic so severely and irrationally. Maybe the point was to demonstrate how out-of-control Will makes her feel. Needed better set up then. Particularly since she became such a cartoon. She lacked reason and accountability.



Also: isn't there a way we can make a beautiful, powerful woman relatable without making her clumsy?



And, yeah, Olivia Munn wasn't horrible. Give her time.
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Your review was dead on and very well written and I mostly agree with it. I know most will say that the Allison Pill story of her hiding under the bed of the now governor's aid to be one of the highlights of this episode, quite rightly.However, my favorite was the second runner up beauty pageant candidate and her comments and /or lack of regarding the issue of immigration at hand. She was the personification of why America is not the greatest country in the world that was raised last week.She is so self-centered and an ignoramus that I just find it very hard to be an optimist over the future of the USA.

I think the renewal of the show for a second season this early on is a mark of great respect shown to the extraordinary cast.I will not single out any one actor because I firmly believe that in the coming weeks each will have their shining moment, and we still have not seen Ms Fonda yet and I think she will just blow our minds. If only they could find a way to get Raquel Welsh in there, then I will be in TV heaven. I am crossing my fingers.

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It was a good episode. I am not sure about doing the "big" reveal about it was Mac that was the reason for the break up with Will rather than will. Was that not obvious? I thought it was a little early for that reveal. But it fit in the story well. It was a nice contrast from the pilot episode where everything just gelled. So now we have the spectrum and I am sure throughout the season we are going to get to see everything in between. So that is nice that it is set. Great episode, I liked it and though Maggie was a little manic it was absurdly funny and tragic at the same time. Seriously, who stays under the bed while the guy your were about to hook up with sleeps with his ex. That was probably the most tragic thing I have heard from a TV show in a long time. Even more so than Ned Stark getting his head loped off.



Also, Why the dislike of Olivia Munn? Is that a thing now? Did I miss the memo? I have only seen her in a few things outside of the few episodes I have watched of AOTS. But she seems nice, and fairly competent.
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Agree with most of what you said and it can become a great show, but please, dial down the heavy handed metaphors. (The noisy new neighbors turn out not to be so bad) Then again that's Sorkin.
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Ohhh I just love having a Sorkin fix on a weekly basis.



I'm not naive though, the show has a few things that can be criticized. The youtube video serves as a reminder that pretty much every show Sorkin writes, and because of the way that he does so, is a spiritual sequel of the previous one. But I'm okay with that, in fact, I love that it is so.



Another great episode this week. I for one disagree with the reviewer, I was laughing throughout. Some of the humour is forced, yes, but there was plenty of good stuff - i.e. the blackberry scene is AWESOME. Seeing Will being irritated Will is just too good. How about him letting the blonde model interject further? Priceless.



I do agree with the reviewer in that it was good to see them fail this week. If only at least to show some of the critics that they don't plan to have a fairy tale every week in terms of delivering the news.



Also worth mentioning was Allison Pill's performance. Outstanding. Is it just me or her character's personality shifted quite a bit from the pilot? Maybe I'm wrong but she came across as a introvert in the pilot, but she was pretty much an extrovert in yesterday's episode. Either way, she delivered.



Eagerly awaiting the next ep.
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thought the pilot was great so I was skeptical about the 2nd but it was a solid episode, nothing amazing but not bad either. Alison Pill's character is so neurotic sometimes and I love it. "I read about it in a movie" haha great. also Olivia Munn AND Chris Messina are in the show now? cool.
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I'm not sure I'll last very long as a viewer of this one, although I am desperately hoping it will improve over the next couple of weeks. I do not buy the whole MacKenzie as goofball, so unrealistic and cringeworthy - this is an experienced war journalist right? The funny parts of this show are NOT funny. And the theme music OMG is just dreadful - to save nothing of it being way too reminiscent of West Wing. It suited WW to have this very grand sweeping orchestral theme but this show, not so much
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I hate the music in the background whenever someone is going to say something important or speech-like. Heavy-handed, clichd, like so many said here. And then everybody goes "Oh, but it's Sorkin " as if he had the right to get away with it.
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My main complaint is, 90% of what the women on this show talk about is their relationships and their ex/current/maybe-future boyfriends.

Two men in a scene: Business walk&talk.

Two women: Blah blah relationship trouble!

Man and woman: WILL THEY BREAK UP/FALL IN LOVE/REUNITE?

Also, the two female leads both cried in the pilot, in their work place. Because that's what professional women do! Not the guys, though!

And lol, women and technology, amirite?

Jesus.
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On the one hand, I've seen very few people cry in the workplace. On the other hand, 100% of those have been women. TV is a lot like life exaggerated and compressed. People say a lot more things and the things they say are a lot more succinct and they have a lot more feelings and a lot more actions in a shorter amount of time. So this is not necessarily wrong.
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The email bungle was straight out of a CBS sitcom. "Reply All" jokes in the second episode already? Eeeeeek!
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All this praise for the future Mrs. Jay Baruchel without a single picture? For shame.
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I have a passionate hatred towards Olivia Munn thanks to various mess-ups when she was on G4, and due to her Daily Show segments. And her Chuck episode. And she.. Did not suck too much in this. When they first announced that she'd be part of the cast, I was slightly worried, but it looks like Sorkin knows what he's doing.



I actually liked episode 2 way more than episode 1, which I liked quite a bit. So it looks like I'll be in this for the long haul.
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-I don't know Olivia Munn from much, but I also thought she started quite well. I think her arrival on the show will bring another something, especially with a connection to MacKenzie.

-I generally try not to focus on race in casting/roles, but now that you mention it, they were pretty much used as comic relief. I like comic relief on a show, so generally I'm not upset about it. But it wouldn't be bad to give them some more substantial stuff. Actually, now that I think about it, I'd love for one of them to be a pretty staunch Republican, because that would give this show a character to help bring/keep the political rhetoric of this show down the middle (so it doesn't just skew ridiculously to the left and annoy the right).

-I'm enjoying Will's character. He's flawed, but real. I didn't know Jeff Daniels from much, but I have no complaints.

-I did not notice, and am still not sure I know what you're talking about with the scrunch-face. Whatever, doesn't bother me.

-Okay, so he uses what he's written before. First, as you said, every writer does that. Michael Crichton wrote a few characters he didn't like into every book, and a goof 75% of them are invariably named Levine for no particular reason. In an interview later in his career, he said he didn't even realize that he was doing it. Some of these quotes were two random scenes from 10 years of TV shows, and 4 movies. You're bound to get repeats like "This is going to get worse before it gets better", "it was really quite something", the collage of slaps, or "that was predictable". I mean, I'm sure there are dozens of TV/movie writers who have written those lines, because they fit with the situation. I don't think my boss is being "uncreative" when he says "well, that was an unusual call", in fact I hear it at least once a week from him. That's life, things repeat. As for lines like "the only thing you had to do to make us happy was to come home at the end of the day", now that's just great imagery and has a very poetic sound to it. I am okay with using that again. Let's not forget that possibly the greatest playwright in the history of the world, the bard, William Shakespeare wrote a TON of his stuff in iambic pentameter. Yeah, because that's realistic and doesn't get repetitive. Writers reuse what they've written. If it's well done, I don't care. If it isn't, well, I'm not watching anyway (or will stop soon), so I again don't care. I think Aaron Sorkin handles his dialogue very well. So, I don't care. If you do, well, no one is forcing you to watch this show. Except for you Alex, I suppose.

-Huh? I know classical music. So beyond the fact that I know that Radiohead is a band, I don't get this. I guess maybe this song was used in the episode as background music? As a musician, I pay attention to the scores of shows, but because I don't really like popular music, I tend to tune that out whenever TV shows use pop music songs for montages and such (and I'll often even fast forward through montages, see: "Grey's Anatomy"). So I'm going to assume that that's what happened here and move on.



A good second episode, where, as you said, it was nice seeing that they're not just suddenly going to be a big group of perfect newscasters. I was embarrassed for them, too, and like you said, that's a good thing. Pill is fantastic in this role, and I am now sad that I had never previously heard of her. She is nailing it. I had less of a problem with MacKenzie's technology fluff, mainly because I've seen something almost exactly like that happen in real life. Can't wait to see what they do with Munn's character. The introduction could set up some interesting stuff, and I am right there with you, Alex, MORE Sam Waterston. The guy is just awesome.
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If you want to talk about rehashing old material, Oscar Wilde used to do it ... a lot. (I'm agreeing with you that it's not really an issue)
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Already saw some of those Sorkinisms in "The Newsroom"... does such a thing makes Sorkin one hell of a lazy writer or a Mamet-level genius that isn't just contempt to repeat phrases 3 times in a row, but repeat them throughout EVERYTHING he ever writes?



Don't know the answer...



I like this show. It may have been over-hyped, but still, I love the cast and I give a damn to what will happen to their characters. That Allison Pill is a standout doesn't surprise me at all - that girl has always be a scene-stealer throughout her career. Completely expect her to get a nomination for her role here - and she'll probably deserve it. I also expect the rest of the background characters to have more to do in the coming episodes - fact is, we're still in the introduction stage of this show, so obviously, less time with be devoted to what makes Dev Patel's character tick to why Will and Mack aren't together anymore (the minute it was established that Mackenzie didn't know how to work the new email program, I knew exactly what she was about to send to everyone at the office, given the conservation she had just 5 minutes before with Will... again, lazy writing or genius move?)



Anyway, I'm still on board - then again, it's not as if there's actual any competition out there against this show, isn't there?



You bet your ass. And you know it too.
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Well, people praise Moffat for his work on Jekyll, Dr Who, and Sherlock.



And yet he recycles some of his lines from time to time. Like his X is like sex/kissing, only there's a winner. And a couple of other gems.



If the writer has a following for the way her writes and such, it's not unheard of to recycle a fan-favorite line/phrase/etc into his new work.
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I was also surprised Olivia Munn didn't suck. If they also keep her to 5 minutes per night, like her character, maybe this will work.
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I hope this episode marked the low point for MacKenzie's character - I hated her being portrayed as anything less than professional at work. I guess because she was so overwhelmingly confident in the pilot, but I thought that it worked as a counterbalance to Will.



Sorkin notoriously not the most technology savvy, but he'd really be better off avoiding "reply all" gaffes going forward. That said, I mostly enjoyed the rest of the moments and Olivia Munn was actually quite convincing. Excited to see how they develop these minor characters over time.

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Very well written. Fantastic Episode! Way better than the first!
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Munn - aside from doing her financial reports rapid fir was pretty good. I think that when Will called her Victoria's Secret that seemed like a nice indication that she and Will might become a bit more intimate. I'm means she's not going to be interested in Jim Harper, right. Just thinking out loud on that.



I think you did a great job in calling it as it was. You used 'train wreck' - in my recap - not finished yet I called it a shipwreck. It seemed that the success of the news show couldn't be improved so the only other direction available was to bollux up the news show.



I also thought that the 1st half had to many long speeches - the ratings things went on too long twice Charley and Reese/ then Reese and Will.



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Thought the episode was fantastic. Really loving the show.
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Daniels. You mean Jeff Daniels. :-P
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Staff
Whoops. Fixed!
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Geeeeez and this was a news article about a show about a news station?! AND THERE WAS A MISTAKE??!! In the article about an episode full of mistakes? Whoa...meta...
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