Why Hulu, Netflix, and Others Don't Need to Revive Canceled TV Shows

When reports surfaced recently that both Netflix and DirecTV were “in early talks” with Fox Television to possibly resurrect the recently axed AMC drama The Killing, all I could do was laugh. No offense to fans of The Killing—there’s a time and a place to rail against the quality of that show, and that time is “the last calendar year” and the place is “the internet”—because my laughter did not have much to do with the show itself.

No, the laughter was reserved for the misguided—and, frankly, ridiculous—game the various forces in the television industry like to play now. Every single time a show with a moderate profile gets canceled, the rumors and reports start flying. This show is going to Netflix. That show is going to Hulu. And DirecTV might be interested in both. This year alone, we’ve had to go through this silly dance with Terra Nova (because any of those outlets can support that stupid-high budget), The River, and The Secret Circle, among others that I probably lost due to rage blackouts. The Killing is the latest in a long line of shows to get buzz about a possible second life despite not really deserving it.

To Netflix, DirecTV, Hulu and anyone else who might be compelled by the idea of resurrecting a barely cold television body like they’re Pushing Daisies' Ned: Knock it off. I’m pleading with you. Not only is reheating nasty leftovers a bad idea for creative reasons, but it also doesn’t make a whole lot of business sense, either.

Setting aside the very real possibility that most of these “stories” we see about shows possibly finding a new home post-cancellation are likely concocted by a crack team of savvy agents, publicists, and studio people (and therefore barely true, so “in early talks” could mean as little as Fox TV texted someone at Netflix “Rosie Larsen” and Netflix responded with a “:/” emoticon), the constant barrage of possible last-second pickups is unsettling. I think we’re all well aware that Hollywood can, at times, be creativity bankrupt and think that keeping a “known” property going is a better idea than trying something new (or in the case of most of these shows, something better). Television is risk-averse. The devil you know is better than the one you do not.

But we’ve long-known that industrial powers are creatively bankrupt or risk-averse, however you want to characterize it. The issue here is that recently, that typical operating procedure has coalesced with more contemporary industry trends, resulting in a lot of unnecessary discussion and poor decision-making.


Original Programming, Everywhere

Over the last few years, more and more cable networks and content providers have tried to get involved in the original scripted programming game. What was once a realm for just the broadcast networks—and then a realm for just the broadcast networks and HBO, Showtime, and FX—has been blown open by AMC and its successes with Mad Men, Breaking Bad, and The Walking Dead. And it’s not just previously middling, unscripted-focused networks like A & E or History that are making a run at finding their version of Mad Men, it’s also providers like DirecTV, Netflix, and Hulu as well.

Make no question, DirecTV, Netflix, Hulu and other digital content providers should make a concerted effort to bring new content to their stables. As a generally well-regarded satellite provider, DirecTV has the capital to make the Audience Network work. And clearly, people are continuing to flock to Netflix and Hulu on a regular basis, so it makes absolute sense that those entities would like to intermix “new” programming with old favorites and episodes that just aired last night. It’s a win on all fronts of those three providers (along with any others, really) to produce and distribute new shows: We win, because more original programming is nice, and theoretically, they win, because they can provide a little extra incentive to drive eyes to their network or web service.

And of course, all three have already successfully helped develop and distribute programming, both brand-new and “new-to-you,” if you will. DirecTV made big waves by coming in and saving Friday Night Lights at the end of Season 2, helping the series last three more glorious seasons. Netflix already brought us Lillyhammer, which wasn’t great but served as an okay start, and House of Cards is coming soon. Hulu gave us Battleground, one of the more overlooked shows of 2012.

The issue isn’t that these content providers should stick to showing us things we could have already watched elsewhere, because they absolutely can and should keep trying to develop original programming. But the key word there is "original."* Resurrecting shows that were discarded by another network isn’t exactly in-line with a strategy based on brand-new or original content. DirecTV’s decision to keep Damages alive hasn’t necessarily backfired, but it hasn’t necessarily paid off, either, and DirecTV has given indications at times that it might be out of the reviving business. Netflix and Hulu are always part of these media rumors (no matter how valid they may be), but neither has actually gone past the flirting stage with a recently canceled show—and that’s because both companies know it won’t work.

* A key point here: I think both Netflix and Hulu have done a great job with bringing international content to the U.S. Hulu in particular has thrived with the likes of Misfits, Rev., and Prisoners of War, among many, many others. These content providers are filling an influential void with that programming and I would argue that doing so creates better brand equity than reviving dead shows. At least now Hulu is known for something other than just last night’s episodes.


The Big Bluth Elephant in the Room

I know what you’re thinking, and it’s the big Bluth elephant in the room: Arrested Development. That show is being resurrected by Netflix with new episodes coming early next year, and well, many people love Arrested Development, so it stands to reason that this deal will work out for the show’s producers, the studio, Netflix, and viewers. Although it may seem like it contradicts everything that I've said thus far, I totally agree with that. Bringing back Arrested Development is a major get for Netflix—albeit one it paid a great deal of money for—and it’s hard to imagine that it won’t bring lots of money and cultural clout to the company's struggling image.

But there are a number of reasons why to Netflix doesn’t actually contradict what I’m getting at. First of all, it’s Arrested Development. No matter your opinion on The Killing, Terra Nova or Pan Am, you can at least admit that AD is a more well-known entity. Second, I would argue that AD’s longer time away from airwaves and the weird circumstances surrounding the constant revival talks since its departure from said airwaves makes it a particularly unique experience that goes above and beyond “well, ABC didn’t have room for The River after eight episodes, so let’s do more.”

Finally, though, and perhaps most importantly, is the fact that a lot of people likely first watched Arrested Development on Netflix, so they already, in some way, associate the show with the content provider (sorry, Fox). Chances are, you or someone you know finally gave in to all the after-the-fact buzz and watched the comedy on Netflix Instant sometime in the past few years, burned through all 53 episodes in 10 days, then complained that there weren’t more and railed against Fox (and maybe even pretended to have seen it years ago).

The point is, Arrested Development has been on Netflix Instant for a long time and more people probably found the show there than on Fox. There’s a brand synergy there that directly stems from the Netflix user experience, which, when combined with the general positive rub that comes from bringing back a beloved cult comedy, makes total sense for Netflix.

Most of the shows that get brought up in the "swoop in for the save" conversations these days are ones that were just canceled and therefore weren’t given much or any time to actually cultivate an audience on the possible saviors' platforms. Maybe a lot of people watched season one of The Killing on Netflix once it was put up for streaming, and maybe a boatload of people watched Terra Nova on Hulu because they couldn’t catch it Monday nights in the fall. But I find it hard to believe those things, and even if those lines of reasoning are true, the amount of people who watched those two shows online still likely pales in comparison to the number of Arrested Development streams on Netflix.


Don't Be a Dumping Ground

Therefore, in considering shows like The River or Terra Nova or The Killing, these growing content providers are not only picking up shows that weren’t particularly beloved in the first place, they also aren’t thinking about how the shows will fit alongside their "regular" content (i.e. just-aired episodes from last night or full runs of much older programming). Granted, this is a problem the providers will have to face with brand-new, entirely original programming as well, as anyone who watched Battleground on Hulu can attest to. Whether the programming is new or “new,” Hulu, Netflix, and their kin have to figure out how to blend it with everything else in the back catalogs.

In any event, much like the struggles AMC has encountered outside of its “big three” programs, Netflix, Hulu, DirecTV, Amazon and whoever else is going to discover that building up a stable of original programming and a real, palpable brand is extremely difficult. AMC has the two best shows on television and the most popular show in basic cable history and the network is still a mess. You can’t just say you’re going to start bringing in original programming and then everything works out.

The choices have to be strategic, and while I think Netflix, Hulu, and DirecTV have been pretty wise to stay away from some of the shows that, frankly, don’t deserve a second life, getting wrapped up in the conversation each time isn’t good for business either.** They shouldn’t want to be the dumping ground for presumed-better networks’ trash.

** Again, I think that industry forces are probably at work with some of these stories, as are fans, who, through the power of social media, can make it appear as if there is a large, or at least loud and active, base who wants to see more of a show. Still though, just as there is no value in letting publicity people or studios sway decision-making, there certainly isn’t value in letting what’s trending on Twitter play any role in what airs where.

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I don't think you give enough credit to "failed" shows, or their fan-bases. Case in point...Star Trek. Here's a show that lasted barely 3 years, had pretty terrible effects and questionable acting, and was gone completely for 10. Suddenly a movie pops up, BECAUSE of the fans, and it's popular again. Enough so that it spawned 9 more movies and 5 TV series ( a collective 31 years of new episodes), not to mention the new series of movies that's just started. All of that from a show that originally aired 45 years ago. Granted, that's not going to happen with every cancelled show, but think of the profits to be made if Netflix, DirecTV, or Hulu (among others) actually listened to the fans and took a chance (again, not to mention the joy it would bring to those fans, and future ones).
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why I think they should resurect "just canceled shows"

-First and foremost is the publicity.

-Second they already have a show put together (semi proven) and ready to run

-Third it would help anchor thier stable of shows.

Having said that, i don't think they should revive more than one a year or two, but give thier custumers a vote, of the shows that have just been cannceled which would you like to see another season of. Then if they get it, barage campain saying "see the next season of xyz(secret circle or tera nova) ONLY on netflix" talk about great marketing... and include the new shows they are trying to bring up
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the only way to proof it, if netflix makes a deal with a company to air a brand new show with new every episode every week. To check where the rating goes. just like waht they did with directv airing new episode of Friday Night Lights which gave the 3 new season. hulu is really hurting these shows and dropping rating down the drains. hulu should not have free access we should pay to watch. amazon is smart if u want better titles then netflix then pay 80 a month. shows should dererves a better service that pay for the contact to get show running. not free access to them. Netflix has a chance to help any series to get better rating more season to it. i like how fox , usa, cwtv, other that you pay to get that show next day air. if hulu plus has no free access u have to pay to watch it will better. We should pay for the contact not watch them for free. I love netflix/ amazon we pay for the contact to get more in the future. Hulu plus is the only company that is hurting networks and our shows from free access.
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Well you're right in the sense that for a network to pick-up a previously cancelled show it obviously has to be finically viable (or at least they have to think it is) for them to continue the show. The major problem is that cancelled shows aren't (especially only after one season), and therefore, why would anyone bother?



If cable networks are going to continue discussing the revival of certain shows they should focus more on shows that have at least shown some sense of longevity on free-to-air television, or shows of which fans have vocally demonstrated that they are desperate to see a satisfying conclusion to. I think networks would make a lot more money doing a one episode or mini-series send off for a long running show that never got a fitting conclusion because of cancellation, over a one season show that got cancelled because it never found an audience.



This would work because nowadays networks are very unceremonious with the television they produce, and not even staple shows like CSI: Miami (which was cancelled without warning by CBS after ten seasons) demonstrates that no show is safe. Some of the long running shows that have loyal fan bases and have had unfitting conclusions over the last couple of years that I think would fit this scheme are: Lie To Me, Heroes, Law & Order, Kyle XY, My Name Is Earl, Life & Pushing Diasies.
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I disagree with the article based on 2 huge points, one being showtime lost interest in Stargate SG-1 at the end of season 5 and that show was revived and lived on on SciFi for another 5 SEASONS and 2 direct to dvd movies and 2 spin-off series, then look at Futurama (even though I don't watch the new stuff myself) It was cancelled but then found new life in the form of direct to dvd movies that proved so popular that the series was picked up again.



Then if you want a third example the British show Primeval was pretty much cancelled when a cost sharing deal was worked out between Sky and Watch 2 produce 2 new seasons, and while hopes for more of it seem to be dwindling we now have a Canadian spinoff called Primeval: New World, all of this has come from shows the parent network lost faith in early on and we ALL know how little faith FOX has in shows, seriously just look at the number of shows fox has canned before even 6 episodes have aired.
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Netflix should really revive Good Vibes though. That show deserves a damn fighting chance.
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PLEASE BRING BACK THE SECRET CIRCLE & VERONICA MARS!!!
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As soon as I saw TSC on the pic, I started getting excited for some reason until I became sad once I realized that it's never coming back.
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I disagree with this article that admits to contradicting itself.



It's simple and not so damn complicated.



You have beloved series that have been canceled with fans clamoring for their return.



The reason those series were canceled is because their viewership was measured with an inaccurate out of date tool while also being prisoner on a television station at a designated time that not many fans can tend to at that moment.



With Netflix and Hulu, you have a flawless system that measures with precise accuracy how many viewers it has while also being free to be watched at any time the viewer wishes.



My love is Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles. After it was wrongfully canceled by Fux, it was shown on Netflix where it obtained millions of new and existing viewers; gaining those millions of newbies as fans of a superb series that was cut off in the middle of its planned grand story.



Obtain Josh Friedman (showrunner) and the cast with most of the writers back and make a (10 episode) Season 3. Watch the love from fans/viewers pour in and make lots of money while also getting someone like me (who doesn't currently subscribe to Netflix) to subscribe to Netflix.



These things can happen. You just need people that want to make it happen. I don't care if so-and-so are busy making or starring in a television series because all those television series are immediately canceled. Also, to make a short season for Netflix would be able to happen between television seasons.
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I laughed because I was thinking about Arrested Development the whole time until the "bluth elephant"
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I too think that they NEED to look at quality shows such as Firefly and Jericho. Arrested Development was nothing more than programming to the lowest IQ level.
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I'd say the highest. It was a smart comedy. Very funny. Clearly not for everyone though. ;)
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I may be one of the few in this opinion, but netflix bringing back Arrested Development is NOT a good way of convincing me that they in any way recognize good canceled shows when they go looking for them. I HATED that show and danced with unrestrained glee when Fox canceled it. I did like Terra Nova and wish that Fox had not canceled that one but do understand it cost too much to make for the viewership it had
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i did like terra nova . was a fan of types of shows like that .it was very cost alot of money
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THE SECRET CIRCLE, it really grew into me. I like the show a lot. And it ended with an gut wrenching thrilling Cliffhanger!



I hope one of these networks resurrects TSC! It was sadly underestimated.
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It's a long shot that these networks would consider bringing it back seeing as it was on The CW and it was expensive to produce. :(
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I think resurrecting some shows is a good idea. Now I must beg and plead PLEASE BRING BACK VERONICA MARS!!!!! Or at least let them make the d*mn movie already. I can't even look at Kristen Bell without getting angry this show was canceled too soon.
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Yes, please. A VM movie is way overdue and I miss the sassy teen detective.
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Revolutionary new company taking Cable TV to the internet!



When will be that headline? To go along with our magically resurrected shows. When it happens and it has HBO and Showtime, sign me up.
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Think OVA as the concept Hulu and Netflix should follow for EXISTING and previous series. Please don't take me too literally, though. While I use the term OVA, I'm not suggesting anime. What I'm recommending is programming that back fills or extends (though original work that matches and/or complements the series existing format).



This programming could be from the original source (production company), fan produced (with copyright permission given, so profit can exist), by the broadcaster (e.g. Hulu, Direct, Netflxi, etc), or others. The key is it extends for the fans the story either by providing background material or new context (maybe from a different "dimension," the future, a time line, or whatever the writer and producers (and fans) accept.



Fans love new material and in many cases will accept lower production in exchange for more material to digest. Just look at Dr. Who lasting so many decades (and I suspect seeing its 100th Anniversary year in 2063), fans producing their own Star Trek series, graphic novels, etc. Fans want content and they LOVE moving pictures and stories that make them think! (Yeah I said it, they want stuff that makes them think, and it is true (especially for those looking for additional content).
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Didn't NetFlix or Hulu also say they were in talks to bring back the mostly horrible post-apocolyptic Jerico?



Anyway, agree with most points. One big problem, given where I am, with Hulu and NetFlix and the lot is that while they may indeed "bring International content to the US", they don't allow ANY content from their sites to be played internationally.
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I agree with most points, but then I don't think money should be spent on saving shows like The River when they could bring back FIREFLY.



FIREFLY

FIREFLY

FIREFLY

FIREFLY

FIREFLY

FIREFLY

FIREFLY

FIREFLY
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You realize, of course, that with several main characters dead and Mr. Fillion already employed on Castle, you're asking for a show that has A) hardly any of the same characters, B) none of the original sets, and C) extremely low-budget special effects, right?
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It was a joke sugar plum
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I wonder how much it will cost them to actually redo AC since Michael Cera went out there and made a name for himself and I can't imagine Will Arnett or Jason Bateman will be cheap to get back either. Also Jeffrey Tambor and Tony Hale have had pretty decent bit part roles.



Here's the thing. A lot of shows don't deserve to be brought back. Ringers, eh. Terra Nova might have been good, but they kind of screwed the pooch on that one with writing and acting. The River was never going to work as a show. However, a lot of shows have gotten a second wind because of the fan base. Chuck survived because of the fans, and a lot of shows that got cancelled way too soon might have benefited from being picked up by the net (FIREFLY, enough said. Though we wouldn't have Castle). Pushing Daisies was another show that should have survived but in all honestly was too smart for TV.



The problem with Cory's conclusion is that a lot of good shows will fall by the wayside. Appealing to the masses might be profitable in the short run, but in the long run you end up cancelling and not even considering bring back actually good shows. There hasn't been a person yet that I have shown Firefly that hasn't loved it and yet it was cancelled because the network put it up against Enterprise (lolz) and didn't support at all and wondered why it didn't do well.
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I am that person... Firefly was "meh". The confusing storyline was confusing-er when the network aired the episodes out of order, but even in the right order there's a lot of "I don't think they've quite figured out what they're trying to do here" moments. By they time Serenity was made, they'd figured out the story they wanted to tell and trimmed away everything else.
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I agree with the premise of Cory's article, but not the conclusion. He leaves out what some have mentioned here - that niche shows gain notoriety postmortem and that a market that caters to those fan-groups could be very lucrative for a company that makes its money from new subscribers. I already watch nearly all of my TV shows via Netflix, but resurrecting shows like Jericho, Rubicon, and Arrested Development - maybe even Caprica - would be worth the price of admission. High concept shows that succeed are few and far between and in some cases (Terra Nova, The River) suffer well-deserved cancellations for one reason or another (writing, acting respectively in the case of my previous two examples) and I was rooting for those two...until I watched them. All that to say that often shows get cancelled because they stink, but other times they suffer a less cut-and-dry demise...and those shows can find life-after-death online...and I hope they do.
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If most of these shows had had enough fans to keep them going they would not need to be brought back. On the other hand there are shows like Firefly I wouldlike to see back. There $. If it works they have new members and some thankful fans. If not we look for another option to watch out TV.
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I would subscribe to Netflix if they brought Pushing Daisies back.
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Resurrecting somewhat old (Firefly, Reaper, Veronica Mars) shows is a great way to get respect from the fanbases that still blame the original network. As well as showing that they are serious about original programming. So.. Do that.
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I didn't even realize The Killing got cancelled. What a waste of time.
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I liked "The Killing". Of course, I can see where it would be quite disconcerting if you're used to your police detectives solving each case in 42 minutes or less.
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Some rare shows actually gain notoriety over the years, only after they've been canceled. Arrested Development and Firefly are two that come to mind. They have much bigger followings now than they ever did while they were on the air. And like with AD, I think if ANYONE were to revive firefly, they'd have a win on their hands. It's a safer play for companies like Netflix to wait a few years after a show has been canceled to see if the buzz dies down or builds up before reviving it; although it's also trickier, because actors move on to other projects, sets are destroyed and would have to be rebuilt (making it more expensive), and no matter how hard you try, I think it's difficult to recapture the magic of a long dead show. That said, I do think certain shows deserve a second life in a new home. If the rumors of reviving Jericho came true, I'd watch it. But just because a show is canceled, doesn't mean it needs to be automatically considered for revival. It's few and far between that revival actually works, and works well.
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Bring back Human Target or no deal...
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Firefly

Pushing Daisies

Better Off Ted

Human Target

Studio 60

Awake

Kings

Special Unit 2

Angel
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Good call. And great example as to adding too much to try to appeal to too broad an audience.



Fox also did this with Breaking In. And ruined it.
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I liked Rubicon
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I agree for the most part. The majority of these were given there chance and didn't do well.



However Rubicon was fantastic and so very much better than The Killing which is what it was dropped for.
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Amen! Rubicon was a gem.
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Your argument holds water, and I agree with it in a larger sense, but you REALLY should have opened with your point about Arrested Development because it separates the concept of something really special and hunted down via Netflix from just random semi-popular canceled shows.



That said, I do agree that the idea of just any old thing being revived via an online entity is an unwise one, there have to be exceptions for significant quality dying prematurely - especially if it had been on Fox. One can only imagine the possibilities if Netflix had been there to rescue Firefly from the clutches of its evil network - who killed the series just as it was finding its legs. But by that same token, rescuing a series like Awake would probably fall right into the trap you're describing, a dumping ground for something moderately followed where it can stagnate for a few episodes and fade away.
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Perhaps I should stop waiting and just produce the second season of Rubicon myself...
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The best shows to consider are those that are more popular as streaming downloads than they are on TV broadcasts. And the shows have to be cheap to make, so sci-fi and fantasy generally are poor choices.
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interesting article but I'm very disappointed....
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Oooh, you guys opened back old wounds. I miss The Secret Circle soooo much. It's one thing I'm still bitter about that we won't have a season 2 this fall. ): I <3 that show so much and PRICE!!!



But I love how much recognition you guys still give it along with other sadly cancelled shows like Awake and Firefly and others. .
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Jericho is also another show that is rumored to be revived by Netflix.









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Jericho was already resurrected once, and... didn't do any better the second time around.
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Jericho is resurrected in the form of Revolution...
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I wouldn't mind, if there would be second season of The Secret Circle...i loved that show...!!
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I agree, there are certain shows that get mentioned that don't need a new home (Terra Nova, The Killing), just let them die in peace. I think the saviour only works for shows that have aired in the wrong place on the wrong network and I'm not sure who's fault that is (Friday Night Lights and Southland never belonged on NBC, Damages shouldn't of been on FX) or, network shows that feel a little too "cable-esque" deserve to be saved by another network or Netflix etc, i.e. Pushing Daisies (a show I only just watched this year due to the wonderful things I heard about it) should of been saved by USA or even Showtime. Maybe after the success of AD, Netflix will maybe bring back Pushing Daisies... Please Netflix, please!
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Yay! Arrested Development!



That is all.
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If a cancelled show has a fan base, and a network or online service thinks that they can make it work, more power to them. I watch a lot of scripted television and every season there are at least a half a dozen shows that I watch which are cancelled. Out of those half dozen, at least two of those I seriously mourn. If for some reason someone wants to renew any of them I'm happy to keep watching. Honestly, I thought Terra Nova sucked, but I watched every episode. If it got picked up again I would continue to watch each additional episode. Personally I'd rather see new episodes of Firefly, Veronica Mars, or even Kings(I can't be the only one) but I'll take whatever I can get to avoid reality programming.
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Firefly ! Hell yes! Best show ever!
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Can I just say that I heard that 'The Killing' might be getting renewed on TV.com itself! So here's one for spreading the rumors as you're saying! Anyways, what I mainly want to say is that I appreciated receiving news on the corporate / studio level. I wish TV.com would do more of that. Instead of just waiting for an episode to premiere. I'd like to know information on why this whole past year shows went off air for weeks on end, a whole month and then come back for a week and then go off again - what were the networks doing, what were their decision making talents that led them to that. Are they just trying to meet a deadline of finishing up in a certain time with lesser episodes - just to maintain what the timings were pre-writers strike? And what's going on with the production of the new fall shows about to premiere? Where are the sneak peaks, interviews, that TV.com is pushing for interviews - instead of something that's released by the networks to every channel? In a nutshell, I'd like to know more diverse information surrounding a show that extends beyond what the plotline of that episode was. What are the inner workings of that show and is TV.com going to take the initiative to go after this kind of info?
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I want The Secret Circle and GCB back :(
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Just wish Directv would have been into saving shows when Angel and Veronica Mars got canceled
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Are u serious? DirecTV saved 2 of the greatest shows ever, Friday Night Lights and Damages! They both got to end with more than 1 season on directv and the way they should end!
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absolutely...
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These rumors do *exactly* what Pushing Daisies' Ned would: revive the show for one minute. By the way, nice reminder of the show!
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Hulu also gave us The Booth at the End, which is even more overlooked than Battleground. Because it's overlooked here, too. :)



http://www.tv.com/shows/the-booth-at-the-end/
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I'm quite happy with DirecTV keeping Damages going, thank you very much!
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Two things: First, I'm fairly sure that Terra Nova had a much larger number of viewers during its run than did Arrested Development. Terra Nova wasn't killed by bad ratings, it was killed by high costs and medium ratings. (Admittedly, it was a mercy killing.)



Second, there are a couple more success stories in reviving canceled shows. Family Guy, for example, and Futurama, both have creative heft in their post-cancellation existence; neither is the pale shadow of itself (as when Scrubs was re-imagined). In other formats, Conan's show is still better than Leno's (though neither is as funny as Craig Ferguson).



Then again, I live in a city where Perry Mason reruns have never left the air. It's one of only three shows I ever saw that were originally black and white (I Love Lucy and Gilligan's Island are the others. Yes, most of the shows were in color, but the first season of Gilligan's Island was b&w).
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I forgot the most successful revived show of all, Star Trek.
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This article is basically saying that you shouldn't buy a foreclosed house because it didn't work out for the people who built it. Taking over a show with a pre-built head start on an audience where someone else paid for the development and the initial advertising is just a smart financial decision. Netflix and Hulu should look at EVERY show that gets canceled on every network to see if the numbers work out for them. If the numbers work out, they should pick it up. They should have financial analysts doing nothing but this all day long every day. By following the logic of this article UPN never buys Buffy because it is no longer "original programming" and that's just wrong.
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Well said! I think it's a good thing that Netflix, Hulu, and DirecTV are considering resurrecting these shows... I mean let's be honest, The Secret Circle, The River and Terra Nova may have not been the greatest of shows out there, but maybe one day future shows with the calibre & creativity of Firefly and Arrested Development (just to name a few) will get a fair shake if cancelled. A very awesome option that was never even available 10 years ago until now.
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Awake! I want Awake back!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Also, what benifits things like Hulu with its imports is that the season are rather short in epsiode lengths, so when another season is added it makes you more likely to come back because you are not drowing in 20+ episodes that covered nothing when you have three or eight or ten that gave the show a great quality depth. That is what makes British television great, is it is short and sweat and you want to come back for more.
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