Alice Cooper

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    • Alice Cooper: We put a stake through the heart of the love generation.

    • Cooper: On stage, I'm this figure, this actor, who does things that people aren't used to seeing and I relish in that reaction. In real life, though, I play golf, I shop and I walk around with no makeup on and my hair in a ponytail. I may not be the typical middle-aged Joe, but I'm closer to normal than you think.

    • Cooper: I have never made fun of religion. Religion is something I don't even want to mess with, because I am really afraid of the clouds opening up and my being struck by lightning. Satanism is something else I don't mess with. I think that the heavy metal bands that do are playing with fire. I have never influenced people in a negative way, and I'm not about to start now.

    • Cooper [On Frank Zappa]: Throughout my life, there are four people I've met who were truly original people. The other three were Groucho Marx, Jim Morrison, and Pablo Picasso.

    • Cooper (About the song "Elected") Total political satire. We hated politics, but the idea of Alice, the scourge of the entire world, being president was just too good. Bob Ezrin helped turn it into this huge masterpiece. While we were working on this, John Lennon would come to the studio alot and listen to this song and tell me, "Its great, but Paul would of sung it better". He was right!

    • Cooper: The two most joyous times of the year are Christmas morning and the end of school.

    • Cooper: I didn't go to my senior prom, but I played it.

    • Cooper: I don't kill chickens, Colonel Sanders does.

    • Cooper: I'm on in 80 cities. Madison was the first place we went No. 1 in the ratings.

    • Cooper: To me, that's treason.

    • Cooper: It (playing fair) is a little more challenging and at the same time a little easier.

    • Cooper: That's the fun audience, ... Everybody is there to have fun.

    • Cooper: The new songs fit right in. They are so close to that style. That is what you want. I wanted them to sound like that era.

    • Cooper: I promise every time I walk down this street I will polish that little star.

    • Cooper: We would walk over the names of Vincent Price, Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi, never, ever thinking that our names would ever be on the Walk of Fame, ... That is really quite a privilege to be here.

    • Cooper: He's Lou Rawls, one of the legends in the business.

    • Cooper: The age of the audience has dropped 10-15 years, maybe more. All of the audiences through Spain, Italy through Germany, the Netherlands and Scandinavia are like 15-16 through 25. It's like 1972 again.

    • Cooper: Look at the bands from 1968 who are still around. What we have in common is a lot of hit records that still get played, and a different work ethic. You used to make an album, do a world tour, and then do it again. Sometimes you made two albums a year. To me, that still goes. I'm always thinking about the next album. That's old school, but that's me. That's show business.

    • Cooper: There is so much great rock from the '60s, '70s, a little thinner in the '80s. I can't believe that there are only 40 songs that get played. There is such a variety of music from that era. There are just so many bands that never get played.

    • Cooper: I've already played with Tiger! He mentioned me in a golf magazine as one of the best celebrity golfers.

    • Cooper: What you have to do is attack them on a level where they can't take their eyes off of you, ... Maybe they came but are kind of indifferent. They want to hear a couple of songs, and then they're going to leave. What you have to do is make sure they're glued to you so they can't leave because they don't want to miss anything.

    • Cooper: I'm in your corner all the way.

    • Cooper: All I really wanted to do was make an album that was going to be just back to what I like to do, ... And it was a coincidence that these new bands, this new wave of bands, were doing Alice and Iggy rock.

    • Cooper: On the last day of school, it's the national anthem. On that day, it's the most popular song on the planet. I become Francis Scott Key for one day.

    • Cooper: This community cannot afford to go backwards we need to be moving ahead and moving together regardless of the color of skin one has.

    • Cooper: If you blink your eyes or go get a Coke, you've missed 10 things.

    • Cooper:It's not an anti-sex trip. Like, we're taking sex, which is probably another half of American entertainment, sex and violence, and we're projecting it, and we're saying this is the way everything is right now.

    • Cooper: That's where their heart is from the sex and violence of TV and the movies, and that was our influence. We weren't brought up under a blues influence.

    • Cooper: We understood that there was someone thinking the same way and so when we got together with him it worked perfectly.

    • Cooper: Well, all of it is a freak thing, because it doesn't coincide with what the normal person thinks of the normal city

    • Cooper: We take that subconscious power and put it on stage because you play what you're influenced by. I'm sure that blues-influenced people live the blues - real blues people.

    • Cooper: They're reacting and that's wonderful. It's better than them sitting there doing nothing. I say make them react - do whatever's in your power to move the audience, and if that's where it is, and there where it is with America, sex and violence, then I say project it.

    • Cooper: We wanted it more live and raw. We didn`t want a studio sound.

    • Cooper: If you're listening to a rock star in order to get your information on who to vote for, you're a bigger moron than they are.

    • Cooper: We can only take it so far, because man can only take it so far, lower self can only take it so far, and you have to realize that the public is only at a certain place.

    • Cooper: So what this is is us, our personalities refined down on to a stage performance. In other words, the way we play is the end product of the way we live - we live in the cities, you see.

    • Cooper: We don't mind that, that's making them accept more, making fun that we accept that. The thing is this is the way we are. We think it's a gas.

    • Cooper: That's like making fun of a maniac because his brain isn't completely right, because he isn't in the norm.

    • Cooper: So what this is is us, our personalities refined down on to a stage performance. In other words, the way we play is the end product of the way we live - we live in the cities, you see.

    • Cooper: Reaction's applauding, passing out or throwing up, and all of that is a reaction, and as much of that we can get, the better. I don't care how they react, as long as they react.

    • Cooper: I'm 18 and I like it!

    • Cooper: When we get together and rehearse, which is always living with each other, we always talk about what would make it better, what would mean more, what would say more. So we're always improving and growing.

    • Cooper: Well, we were all in high school and we got together, and in college - we were in art college together.

    • Cooper: We're tired of that and we won't accept that, we won't accept the blues except certain blues people that are real blues people.

    • Cooper: We identified with Frank. We were of course influenced - when everybody hears Zappa, they're influenced by him, just like The Beatles.

    • Cooper: We got on his label, and the Bizarre organization is just going up and up. So we have faith.

    • Cooper: It's like this - these five members have been influenced of course by other groups, because that's where this generation's groups came from - an environment like the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, the Yardbirds, and The Who. People like that.

    • Cooper: It's Frank's painting on the cover. We were originally going to use a Salvador Dali painting that we got permission from Salvador Dali to use, and Frank found this one, and it really did fit the music much.

    • Cooper: It's a big flash of all these things and whatever you take out of that statement's one statement, one mind, one statement, one act, one show, and all the songs are one.

    • Cooper: He (Marilyn Manson) has a woman's name and wears makeup. How original.

    • Cooper: You can't get the visual thing on the record as much as you'd like to. We produced this album, and we'd never done that before, except when we produced singles for ourselves.

    • Cooper: Yet I was Marilyn Manson - times 10.

    • Cooper: When we get together and rehearse, which is always living with each other, we always talk about what would make it better, what would mean more, what would say more. So we're always improving and growing.

    • Cooper: We started combining the use of light and the use of theatrics and the use of as many art forms as possible, and it's still growing - that's the whole idea of it.

    • Cooper: We like reactions - a reaction is walking out on us, a reaction is throwing tomatoes at the stage, that's a healthy psychological reaction.

    • Cooper: We just set it up and recorded it the way we played it. But that was the way we played it then.

    • Cooper: They pick all of us out, and then they decide, they computerize, decide if they like it or don't like it, and then they go home, and then they come back again because they're not sure what they saw.

    • Cooper: They coincide with each other but they don't at the same time. So what it is, is when people come to see us the first time, they see this.

    • Cooper: The hippies wanted peace and love. We wanted Ferraris, blondes and switchblades.

    • Cooper: That was very close to getting killed. Usually at pop festivals we have people jumping on stage.

    • Cooper: People that haven't seen us yet are shocked because they think that Alice Cooper must be a female folksinger. They don't expect the whole thing.

    • Cooper: You just let your lower self go, and then it takes on all these aspects of the society - the city with horns blowing, the people yelling things at each other, and the all-in-all violence and chaos of the city. Put that on stage with music, and that's what this is.

    • Cooper: If you confine it, you're confining a whole thing. If you make it spontaneous, so that anything can happen, like we don't want to confine or restrict anything. What we can do, whatever we can let happen, you just let it happen.

    • Cooper: If it's total freedom, I guess the ultimate thing you can go into is total silence between the audience and performer, with the performer projecting something he doesn't even have to play.

    • Cooper: I think he was trying to produce more of a... sort of a cheaper image.

    • Cooper: I appreciate an audience that reacts to the music, even if they jump on stage and try to beat us up, I think that's a fantastic reaction. I think that they're really hearing something then.

    • Cooper: He started to, but we said we weren't happy with the feelings we got off the cut... the album now is more us than the other production that Frank did.

    • Cooper: He didn't get the feeling that we wanted - nothing on him, but he wasn't on the same trip.

    • Cooper: Is everybody that depressed? It's a depressing feeling to me. You know: "I lost my baby." I don't care if you lost your baby, I care if you're feeling OK. Don't tell me your problem - tell me what good's been happening to you.

    • Cooper: If you get murdered - what a great thing. What a great publicity thing.

    • Cooper: If it's total freedom, I guess the ultimate thing you can go into is total silence between the audience and performer, with the performer projecting something he doesn't even have to play.

    • Cooper: I appreciate an audience that reacts to the music, even if they jump on stage and try to beat us up, I think that's a fantastic reaction. I think that they're really hearing something then.

    • Cooper: He started to, but we said we weren't happy with the feelings we got off the cut... the album now is more us than the other production that Frank did.

    • Cooper: He didn't get the feeling that we wanted - nothing on him, but he wasn't on the same trip.

    • Cooper: City people live the city. We live in L.A., New York, we live in places where it's chaotic and you never know what's gonna happen. And that's the music - you never know what's gonna happen.

    • Cooper: Rumor's about how the band got it's name were running ramped when they first got started. It had been said that they got the name from a Ouija board or they got the band name from a woman who was burned at the stake for practicing witchcraft.

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