Arnold Vosloo

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Born

6/16/1962 , Pretoria, South Africa

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Biography:

Arnold Vosloo quickly established a fine reputation as an actor in his native South Africa, winning several awards there for his theatre work, including More Is In Lang Dag, Don Juan and Torch Song Trilogy. A regular performer with South Africa's State Theatre, he also played leading roles in Savages, Twelfth Night and Hamlet. His film career in the RSA brought him The Dalro Award (FYI: these awards are no longer given out in South Africa) as Best Actor for both Boetie Gaan Border Toe and Circles In A Forest, and the Dalro Best Actor Nomination for the film version of More Is 'n Lang Dag. After moving to the United States, he appeared in Born In The R.S.A. at Chicago's Northlight Theatre and starred with Al Pacino and Sheryl Lee in a Circle In The Square Uptown production of Salome (his character's name was "Jokanaan"). The latter running for a total of 18 performances only between June 28, 1992 and July 2, 1992. Vosloo's film credits include Ridley Scott's 1492 Conquest of Paradise, John Woo's Hard Target (produced by James Jacks and Sean Daniel), Darkman II and Darkman III, both directed by Bradford May and George Miller's Zeus And Roxanne. Equally at home on the television screen, Vosloo appeared in American Gothic for Fox and Nash Bridges for CBS.


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IMDb mini-biography by
Universal Studios
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Spouse
'Sylvia Ahi' (16 October 1998 - present)
'Nancy Mulford' (1988 - 1991?) (divorced)

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Trivia

American citizenship since 1988


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Personal quotes

(On his costume in The Mummy) "I'm no Mr. Fitness, but I had done some exercise. When I finally got to London, they showed me my costume, and it was like the size of a postage stamp."
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