David Warner

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David Warner

Born

7/29/1941, Manchester, England, UK

Birth Name

David Warner

Gender

Male
8.7
out of 10
User Rating
13 votes

Biography

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David Warner was born on July 29, 1941 in Manchester, England. David was born out of wedlock and spent much of his youth alternating between living with his father and his mother. He eventually settled in with his father and stepmother, and began his acting career in his…more

Credits

Trivia and Quotes

  • Trivia

    • In 1981, David won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or a Special playing Falco on  Masada.

    • David suffered from stage freight.

    • David's performances in the movies "We Joined the Navy", "The Deadly Affair" and "Straw Dogs" were all uncredited.

    • David has been a member of CART (California Radio Artists Theatre).

    • David became the first actor to portray Batman's long time nemesis Ra's Al Ghul on the screen in the Batman: The Animated Series:. He has since reprised the role in 3 different animated series: Batman Beyond, Batman Gotham Knights and Superman.

    • David has twice portrayed Reinhard Heydrich, one of the architects of the Holocaust, in "Holocaust" and "Hitler's S.S.: Portrait in Evil", even thought he is Jewish.

    • David has lent his voice to the following video games: "Privateer 2: The Darkening", "Fallout: A Post-Nuclear Role-Playing Game", "Descent 3", "Star Wars: Force Commander", "Star Trek: Klingon Academy" and "Forgotten Realms: Baldur's Gate II - Shadows of Amn".

    • Before taking up acting David was a book salesman.

    • In 1980 David was nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actor for "Time After Time"

    • David attended the Feldon School and the Royal Leamington Spa in Warwickshire England.

    • In 1978, David was nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Drama Series playing Reinhard Heydrich on Holocaust.

    • In 1998, David was nominated for a SAG award for his movie Titanic. The category was Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Theatrical Motion Picture.

    • David is good friends with director Nicholas Meyer, who he worked with in Time After Time (1979) and Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991).

    • David's character name, Gorkon, in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991), was invented by combining the last names of Mikhail Gorbachev and Abraham Lincoln.

    • David was considered for the part of Uncle Joe in Charlie And The Chocolate Factory (2005).

    • David was a classmate of fellow British actor Patrick Stewart.

    • After RADA, David became a member of the Royal Shakespeare Company and got the part of "Blifil" in Tom Jones (1963). With the title role in Morgan: A Suitable Case for Treatment (1966) and a two-year stint as "Hamlet" with the RSC, David became a star at 24

    • After a series of odd jobs, David was accepted at the Royal Academy Of Dramatic Arts (RADA) where he was very unhappy.

    • David's parents, Herbert Simon Warner and Doreen (Hattersley) Warner, separated when he was a teenager and he only saw his mother again seven years later - on her deathbed.

    • David once described his childhood as "messy". His father changed jobs often and moved from town to town. David ended up having to attend eight different schools and "failed his exams at all of them."

    • David is a close friend of Malcolm McDowell, whom he met on the set of "Time After Time" (1979).

    • David has played at least three different species in the Star Trek universe: a human in Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989), a Klingon in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991), and a Cardassian on the Star Trek: The Next Generation episodes, "Chain Of Command, Parts I & II."

    • David has been in 3 movies featuring the Titanic: S.O.S. Titanic (1979) (TV Film), Time Bandits (1981) and Titanic (1997).

    • David's limp in Straw Dogs (1971) was real. He had smashed both his heels in a fall sometime before filming began and it was a long time before he could walk normally again. Warner's name is not in the credits because, for his career's sake, he didn't want people to know about his problem. It was not for insurance reasons as it has been often written.

    • David has narrated the following audiobooks:
      "The Haunting of Hill House" (1999)
      "The Club Dumas" (1999)
      "Ivanhoe" (1997)
      "Murder for Love, Murder for Men: The Loving You Get" (1996)
      "The Six Messiahs" (1995)
      "The Poetry of Edgar Allan Poe Vol. 2" (1996)
      "The Poetry of Edgar Allan Poe" (1995)
      "Great Cat Mysteries" (1996)
      "The Complete Spoken Word Bible; Ruth, Samuel 1 & 2" (1997)
      "A Classic Mystery Sampler" (1986)

    • In 2003, David played "The Doctor" in the Doctor Who audio production Doctor Who Unbound: Sympathy for the Devil, it was produced by Big Finish.

    • After nearly 20 years away from the live theatre, David returned to the stage as Andrew Undershaft in the 2001 Broadway revival of Shaw's Major Barbara.

    • David supplied the voiceover for the TV commercial for the "Metroid" the video game in 1991 and the Ford Explorer in 2001.

    • David made his film debut as Albert Finney's younger brother in Tom Jones (1963).

    • David was chosen by Tony Richardson for his role in Tom Jones (1963) after the director enjoyed his performance in the play Afore the night (1962).

    • David is an Associate Member of RADA.

    • David is 6' 2" (1.88 m) tall.

    • David provided the voice for "Jon Irenicus" the the main villain in the Bioware 2000 RPG Baldur's Gate II: Shadows of Amn.

    • David was married to Harriet Lidgren from 1969 to 1972. He married to Sheila Kent in 1981. They have one daughter, Melissa, born in 1982.

    • David suffers from severe vertigo. A double had to be used in Time Bandits (1981) during the scene where the Evil Genius walks up the steps after caging the bandits, because he could not handle the drop below him.

  • Quotes

    • David Warner: The more movies I do, the less dialogue I get. I had more lines in 2 minutes of "Scream 2" than 3 hours and a half of "Titanic".

    • David Warner: (advice to young actors) My standard joke answer when people ask me this is "Don't run with scissors!" but I guess if there was one thing I'd say it would be "If you want to be a middle aged and very successful film star, do 40 years of theatre!" Numerous examples include Judi Dench, Ian McKellen, Patrick Stewart, Helen Mirren – I could go on!

    • David Warner: (about doing audio work) As an actor whose done stage, movies and television, to do audio work solely means you don't have to shave, you can wear what you want. You can walk around in your underpants. It's really great! It really is great fun. And also the thing about audio that I think people forget is that it gives people a chance to use their imaginations. To create their own world, rather than having it given to them like on film or on television. And I think that's very exciting: to keep the mind active. Because people can just take off, especially to this.

    • David Warner: It doesn't bother me a bit. I'm an actor and I play all sorts of things. And I haven't always played the bad guy. The trouble is, when I play a good guy, nobody recognizes me.

    • David Warner: (following a long hospitalization in the early 70's) Obviously, I've had a lot of time to sit and think and while I don't say I'll never be scared again this experience has taught me some things. For one, I've been too serious for 30 years. I've taken an over-serious attitude to me. I want my approach to life to be lighter. It's difficult to explain without going into clichés.

    • David Warner: It's all out of one's hands. One goes and does one's best. That's what Albert Finney says -- one main hit, that's all you can hope for.

    • David Warner: (about the movie "The Omen") I never saw it as a horror movie.

    • David Warner: If people are given quality stuff to watch, they'll watch it.

    • David Warner: I don't think I could be happy as an actor if there was a tyrant on the set.

    • David Warner: On film sets, people get put down in public a lot.

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