TV.com will be making changes to the Private Message system the week of Jan 26, 2015. For more information click here

Eric Fleming

Follow

Eric Fleming Trivia

FILTER BY TYPE

  • Trivia

    • One of Eric Fleming's hobbies was sculpture.

    • Eric Fleming starred with Andy Griffith, Don Knotts, and Roddy McDowall in the Broadway hit No Time For Sergeants from 1955 to 1957.

    • Eric Fleming served as Stage Manager during the 1952 run of Stalag 17 at the Forty-Eighth Street Theatre.

    • Eric Fleming could speak Spanish fluently

    • Since Eric Fleming was tall and looked much older than kids his age, he found it easier to survive on the streets than those his own age during the Great Depression.

    • Eric Fleming tried to kill his abusive father with a revolver at 8 years old. Fleming recalls, "the reason I tried to kill him is because it was either him or me."

    • Eric Fleming wore a brace on his right leg as a child to correct a club foot.

    • Eric Fleming had a life-long love for the sea. He served with the Merchant Marines, the Seabees and the U.S. Navy. His desire was to retire and live in Hawaii but ironically his untimely death took place in a tropical river doing what he loved--acting.

    • Eric Fleming was on the cover of TV Guide February 4, 1961.

    • Eric Fleming always claimed that he pretty much led a hand to mouth existence before being cast in Rawhide.

    • Eric Fleming's father was listed as an oilfield worker on his birth certificate.

    • Eric Fleming resided in the Hollywood Hills section of Los Angeles.

    • Eric Fleming was survived at his death by his 69 year old mother.

    • Eric Fleming attained the rank of Master Carpenter in the Seabees.

    • In an interview years after Rawhide ended, Clint Eastwood described Eric Fleming as being a prickly character to work with.

    • Eric Fleming's most famous movie role was the classic 1959 B-movie horror film Curse of the Undead in which he appeared with future Untouchables actor Bruce Gordon.

    • Eric Fleming's catchphrase on Rawhide was "Head 'em up and move 'em out!"

    • Eric Fleming was a member of the original Broadway cast of Stalag 17.

    • Eric Fleming neither married nor fathered any children. He was planning to marry longtime girlfriend Lynn Garber at the time of his death.

    • Eric Fleming co-starred with Doris Day in the 1965 film The Glass Bottom Boat.

    • Eric Fleming wrote two episodes of Rawhide: A Woman's Place and Incident of the Night on the Town.

    • Eric Fleming was a member of a street gang during his youth.

    • Eric Fleming had a testy relationship with Rawhide co-star Clint Eastwood.

    • CBS executives fired Eric Fleming from Rawhide at the end of the show's seventh season.

    • Eric Fleming was contemplating retiring from acting at the time of his death. He had recently purchased a ranch in Hawaii.

    • Eric Fleming is buried on the grounds of the University of Peru in Lima.

    • Eric Fleming underwent several facial reconstruction surgeries to his face because of injuries suffered in the Seabees.

    • According to Hollywood lore, Eric Fleming hopped a freight train to Chicago at the age of 8 in order to escape an abusive home life in California.

    • After leaving Rawhide, Eric Fleming guest starred in two episodes of Bonanza. Both episodes aired after his untimely death.

  • Quotes

    • Eric Fleming: (When he confronted his father as an adult) [My father] was so miserable that I realized nobody could hurt him as much as he had hurt himself so I just left.

    • Eric Fleming: (Describing himself as a child) [I was] an ugly child with a tremendously large nose.

    • Eric Fleming: (Sharing about his childhood in a 1956 interview) The beginning wasn't so hot. I was born in Santa Paula, California. My father was an oil rigger and the best I can remember of him were the beatings he gave me.

    • Eric Fleming: (Referring to a $100 bet he lost at an acting audition) I was terrible. I lost a lot of pride too - which hurt - but the $100 hurt worse. I decided I would do something about it; acting cost me that hundred and I made up my mind it was going to pay me back.

    • Eric Fleming: (Referring to his plastic surgery after a Navy accident) I look altogether different; I had no idea I'd end up looking like this. I've learned that it's give and take all the way and I have the "before and after" advantage which gives a wonderful balance of values.

    • Eric Fleming: (Commenting on his role in Rawhide) I figured nothing would come of it. The first script was aimed at the guest stars and I was only one of eight regulars. I was astounded to see the final version and find Clint Eastwood and I were the stars.

    • Eric Fleming: (When asked if he tired of being asked for his autograph) A little, but it's better than not being asked.

    • Eric Fleming: (Reflecting on his acting career after Rawhide) I'm learning to live again. You can't imagine how pleasant it is to work with a washed face and have a rug under your feet. There is something deadly about working for seven years with a male cast.

    • Eric Fleming: (Referring to The Glass Bottom Boat and his love for Hawaii) I'm getting back to the things that interest me - art, writing, oceanography, fishing. This picture came along and I might do one in Europe where Rawhide was even more popular. But most of all, I want to get back to those islands... when I go this time, I will go to stay.

    • Eric Fleming: (Commenting on how an accident changed his view of life at age 17) By then I was disciplined to things just happening to me. And I'd learned never to turn my back on life.

    • Eric Fleming: Most cattle today are like one large filet. They are too pampered to appear on Rawhide.