Gerald Ford

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Gerald Ford

Born

7/14/1913, Omaha, Nebraska, USA

Died

12/26/2006

Birth Name

Leslie Lynch King, Jr.

Gender

Male

Also Known As

Leslie Lynch King, Jr., Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr.
9.7
out of 10
User Rating
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Biography

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Gerald Ford (July 14 1913- December 26 2006) was the 38th President of the United States. He is the only ever person to become both President and Vice-President of the United States with out being elected. He succeeded Richard Nixon in 1974, after the "Watergate" scandal and served…more

Credits

Trivia and Quotes

  • Trivia

  • Quotes

    • Gerald Ford: (State of the Union Address, January 19, 1975) We must introduce a new balance in the relationship between the individual and the government - a balance that favors greater individual freedom and self-reliance.

    • Gerald Ford: (Address at Jacksonville University, Jacksonville, Florida, December 16, 1971) In a political sense, there is one problem that currently underlies all of the others. That problem is making Government sufficiently responsive to the people. If we don't make government responsive to the people, we don't make it believable. And we must make government believable if we are to have a functioning democracy.

    • Gerald Ford: The length of one's days matters less than the love of one's family and friends.

    • Gerald Ford: (Memorial Day Address, Arlington National Cemetery, May 31, 1976) The founding of our Nation was more than a political event; it was an act of faith, a promise to Americans and to the entire world. The Declaration of Independence declared that people can govern themselves, that they can live in freedom with equal rights, that they can respect the rights of others.
      In the two centuries that have passed since 1776, millions upon millions of Americans have worked and taken up arms when necessary to make that dream a reality. We can be extremely proud of what they have accomplished. Today, we are the world's oldest republic. We are at peace. Our Nation and our way of life endure. We are free.

    • Gerald Ford: All my children have spoken for themselves since they first learned to speak, and not always with my advance approval, and I expect that to continue in the future.

    • Gerald Ford: (First Presidential Address, 1974) The oath that I have taken is the same oath that was taken by George Washington and by every President under the Constitution. But I assume the Presidency under extraordinary circumstances never before experienced by Americans. This is an hour of history that troubles our minds and hurts our hearts. Therefore, I feel it is my first duty to make an unprecedented compact with my countrymen. Not an inaugural address, not a fireside chat, not a campaign speech - just a little straight talk among friends. And I intend it to be the first of many.

    • Gerald Ford: I believe in friendly compromise. I said over in the Senate hearings that truth is the glue that holds government together. Compromise is the oil that makes governments go.

    • Gerald Ford: America now is stumbling through the darkness of hatred and divisiveness. Our values, our principles, and our determination to succeed as a free and democratic people will give us a torch to light the way. And we will survive and become the stronger - not only because of a patriotism that stands for love of country, but a patriotism that stands for love of people.

    • Gerald: Truth is the glue that holds government together. Compromise is the oil that makes governments go.

    • Gerald: In all my public and private acts as your president, I expect to follow my instincts of openness and candor with full confidence that honesty is always the best policy in the end.

    • Gerald: I'll know I'm getting better at golf because I'm hitting fewer spectators.

    • Gerald: A government big enough to give you everything you want is a government big enough to take from you everything you have.

    • Gerald: The Constitution is the bedrock of all our freedoms; guard and cherish it; keep honor and order in your own house; and the republic will endure.

    • Gerald: I am acutely aware that you have not elected me as your president by your ballots, so I ask you to confirm me with your prayers.

    • Gerald: The political lesson of Watergate is this: Never again must America allow an arrogant, elite guard of political adolescents to by-pass the regular party organization and dictate the terms of a national election.

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