Maggie Kirkpatrick

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Maggie Kirkpatrick

Born

1/29/1941, Albury, NSW, Australia

Birth Name

Margaret Ann Downs

Gender

Female
10
out of 10
User Rating
9 votes

Biography

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Margaret Ann Downs was born on 29th January 1941 in Albury, a small town on the border between New South Wales and Victoria, Australia. Only six months later her father, James Downs, was killed whilst on active service as a soldier in North Africa. This tragedy meant that…more

Credits

Trivia and Quotes

  • Trivia

  • Quotes

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on reruns of 'Prisoner' and the musical)
      To be honest, I'd really rather have put the whole thing to bed in 1986 when the show ended, but the powers that be don't let that happen. The just keep replaying it, and because I don't get any replay fees, or any residuals for those sales all over the world, I just think, well, this is my turn to make a quid out of it. So I'm perfectly happy to go and do the musical which is absolute shlock but great fun. I mean, who can knock an hour and a half on stage every night with people screaming with laughter? It's great fun.

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on fans)
      I like to be able to leave the theatre and then go to whatever club or wherever and have a drink with my mates and not be pestered. Fortunately that doesn't matter in Australia because, as you well know, if ever I go to any places along Oxford Street it's just 'oh, that's her'. Which is fine because I am as known to the gay community for doing other things than 'Prisoner'.

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on performing with UK crossover drag legend, Lily Savage in the high camp, tribute piss-take of 'Prisoner')
      It was heaven. He's so wicked, and clever and I kind of learned to be a straight feed to a comic in that show, because I never quite knew what he was going to do next. He's the master of ad lib. Off he would go on a tangent and I would just deal with that, never trying to compete with that sort of rare comedy, but perhaps just adding to it just by the look. Then he'd veer right back to a cue that was necessary, so I was quite happy to go along with that, and knowing I could get a laugh with just a look was quite gratifying. It was a lot of laughs on and off the stage. We were like a pair of naughty kids together. I had to come home and give my liver a rest!

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on her one woman show 'The Screw is Loose')
      Actually, at this moment I don't really feel desperately afraid about it, because doing this show is sort of out there somehow in the future. But the days are slipping by and it's going to be here before I know it and there's no turning back now. I've just got to keep on with it!

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on bodily functions)
      I recently [Agust 2006] underwent a four hour operation to remove a rather nasty little polyp/tumour from my colon.It was a bit of a shock but thankfully it was discovered during a routine colonoscopy and after 20cms of colon was removed, the all clear was given....no malignancy. So, I am recovering extremely well and thankful for my vigilence in matters of health. I share this news with you because I realise that so many people are shy, embarrassed or whatever about discussing bodily functions, particularly matters of the bowel. DON'T BE COY. Bowel cancer is highly prevalent....but can be avoided and indeed cured if caught early enough. Be aware of your bodies....and take apropriate steps with your G.P.if you have any doubts !

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on her accomplishments for 2006)
      Agood part of the last 12 months has been taken up with playing Yente in a wonderful production of 'iddler on the Roof'where I had the great pleasure of playing opposite the legendary Topol. What a superb performer....watching him every night was like a master class in acting. He is also a remarkable human being who devotes an enormous amount of time and money to helping the less fortunate, particularly children and the aged. Sadly in most affluent societies, these are the most neglected.

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on her role in 'The Shoehorn Sonata')
      My character, Bridie was an Australian Army nurse who rescued Sheila, a young English schoolgirl when their ships were sunk in the South China Seas. Together they see each other through the horrors of one of the most infamous camps of the period. Not much was ever told about this period in our history because the British and Australian authorities of the time felt that it would reflect badly on them (the men) if word got out about the horrors that 'their women of the Empire' were subjected to. This is possibly my favourite role of all that I've played ... as an actress. I also feel honoured to tell the story of remarkable women enduring some of the darkest times in our history.

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on New Year's Resolutions)
      I decided to think positive about the next year. If you think positive then you gain positive things, whereas negative thoughts just generate negative things. I'm a survivor and those down times help you to apprciate the good times.

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on powerful women and gender)
      It's the old fashioned double standards again. If a man goes around with lots of women, he's called a stud, if a woman goes around with lots of men, she's called a tart or a slut. In business men are called ambitious, whereas women are referred to as bitches. The equalising of men and women had to happen, certainly in politics, so that there is fair representation.

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on war)
      [War] is a totally evil thing created by old men who wish to inflict their opinion on the young, and let's face it, most wars are created because of greed.

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on her role in 'The Shoe Horn Sonata')
      One of the reasons I love playing women of this generation is because I really feel the need to pay homage to people who survived both the Great Depression and then World War II.

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on doing theatre)
      I love rehearsals. I'm terrified of performing. But only for a minute or two!

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on working on 'Prisoner Cell Block H)
      It's exploited me for years but I in turn have exploited it. It gave me four and a half years' steady employment, but out of 36 years (that's) not a big bite, is it? I'm not ashamed of the character, but there are other things that are dearer to me.

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on a lack of roles for older actors)
      It makes me frustrated that I'm not constantly honing my skills When I was 20 I expected at [this age] to still be working and constantly learning and embracing all sorts of ideas and emotions that go with interesting people's work. When the opportunity presents itself then it's a double-edged sword because I'm scared. I wonder if those skills are rusty.

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on passion)
      I'm passionate about things. As I get older there are probably fewer friends, but I am passionate about the closeness of those precious few. I'm passionate about excellence in work, and I strive for excellence. I'm passionate about my grandchildren, and what the future might hold for them. I'm passionate about the survival of the species, the planet... One acquires a greater sense of mortality when you've got grandchildren. It makes death just a little more real.

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick : (on aging as an actor) I get a little more pessimistic as I get older with this business called acting. You spend X amount of years honing a skill and when you reach an age where you think you've really git something to offer, invariably that's the time nobody wants you. It's hard to maintain the self-esteem, it's hard to maintain the joy for the skills that you've acquired and, frankly, if I knew how to do something else, I would.

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick : (on playing Joan "the Freak" Ferguson in 'Prisoner') It was the most liberating thing I've ever done.

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on aging) I'm seeing everything in a very light-hearted way these days. Things that, you know, 20 to 30 years ago or even 10 to 15 years ago I might have seen as painful, I'm now looking at with older eyes and I think 'oh, Christ did I really, how could I have been so f**ing stupid?' and have a laugh about it. Which is quite wonderful, not to have any sort of bitter regrets about things, to be able to say what a silly bastard I was. But it's all kind of growing up, I suppose. Some of us are late developers, and it's taken me till now to realise that this is who I am. As an actor one is always terrified of what people think of one, but I think I've been growing towards this piece of mind for a long time. This is it. I don't have to pretend to be anything other than Maggie.

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on 'Prisoner Cell Block H: The Musical') To be honest, I'd really rather have put the whole thing to bed in 1986 when the show ended, but the powers that be don't let that happen. The just keep replaying it, and because I don't get any replay fees, or any residuals for those sales all over the world, I just think, well, this is my turn to make a quid out of it. So I'm perfectly happy to go and do the musical which is absolute shlock but great fun. I mean, who can knock an hour and a half on stage every night with people screaming with laughter? It's great fun.

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on Australia) It's the freedoms that we enjoy here in Australia which are the most important to me - freedoms that in these past few months I've seen slipping away, and they are in danger of slipping away if we don't do something about it. We don't really understand how little it takes to compromise that stuff. The racial and political and sexual freedoms that we enjoy, for which we are known throughout the world, are looking very tenuous to me at the moment and that saddens me. It's all very well for people to joke about Pauline Hanson, but right from the outset there is no joking there, oh no. If ever I have seen a woman being used by the forces of evil it's her and it terrifies me.

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on working on 'Prisoner Cell Block H: The Musical' in England) I [had] a terrific time doing 'Prisoner Cell Block H: The Musical' (a Mike Walsh co-production) and we had a terrific run on the West End. It was a bit of a surprise to everyone. I mean, we were really bold with it. Unlike a lot of musicals that open on the West End, we didn't have weeks of try outs. We, in fact, had only four previews and there we were with our bare faces hanging out and we opened to a standing ovation. Even Andrew Lloyd-Webber got up on his feet!

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on doing her one woman show 'The Screw Is Loose') I don't really feel desperately afraid about it, because doing this show is sort of out there somehow in the future. But the days are slipping by and it's going to be here before I know it and there's no turning back now. I've just got to keep on with it.

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on turning 50) There's this awful let-down of suddenly feeling you're on the garbage heap, emotionally and professionally.

    • Maggie Kirkpatrick: (on growing up in the 1950s)
      Young girls in 1955 were a carbon copy of their Hollywood idols and (on the subject of marriage) the wedding was seen as the most important day in a girl's life - the importance placed on everything going according to plan, with no consideration given to the rest of their lives.

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